(Closed) Is a .20 ct round diamond flawless better then a .50 ct flawed diamond

posted 6 years ago in Rings
  • poll: Would you pick a smaller flawless stone over a larger flawed stone
    Smaller flawless stone : (79 votes)
    52 %
    Larger flawed stone : (72 votes)
    48 %
  • Post # 46
    Member
    2091 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: September 2014

    You have a good enough budget to get a middle-of-the-road, eye clean .50 carat and still get the setting and wedding band. He needs to show you other diamonds or you have to look elsewhere. You can find some amazing steals at pawn shops or antique stores. Online (places like ebay) often have sellers that are individuals who could also really use the money. Some of them own pawn shops or other small stores. You just have to make sure they say in writing that if you are not happy that they will issue you a refund when you return the stone or ring. Either way you could get an amazing wedding set with either option I gave within your budget. Good luck!

    Post # 49
    Member
    2976 posts
    Sugar bee

    I would look for a third stone.  

    Excellent/ideal cut – nothing less.  A wonderful cut means a beautiful sparkly stone.  You could pay huge amounts of money for a D colour internally flawless stone but if it is badly cut it will be dark and dull.  Even a low colour and clarity but a better cut will be prettier.  Also go for certification.  AGS and GIA are the best certification.  

    Most people can’t tell the difference between a D colour and an I colour once a diamond is set in a ring so why pay for something you cannot see.

    Internally flawless means that an experienced jeweller cannot see any flaws or marks when using x 10 magnification.  They can only just see something in VVS and VS stones under this magnification..  They can’t see anything when they look at them normally.  This is what is known as eye clean.  Again why pay for something you can’t see.  Some S1 stones are eye clean too or they possess a single tiny black spot can be hidden under prongs.  S2, I2 and I2 have flaws that are progressively more visible under normal viewing.  You would be very lucky indeed to get a good stone that is any of these.

    You’ll get more diamond for your budget if you shop online: Whiteflash, Good Old Gold, Brian Gavin and James Allen are all reputable.

    Good luck.

    Post # 50
    Member
    2976 posts
    Sugar bee

    I would look for a third stone.  

    Excellent/ideal cut – nothing less.  A wonderful cut means a beautiful sparkly stone.  You could pay huge amounts of money for a D colour internally flawless stone but if it is badly cut it will be dark and dull.  Even a low colour and clarity but a better cut will be prettier.  Also go for certification.  AGS and GIA are the best certification.  

    Most people can’t tell the difference between a D colour and an I colour once a diamond is set in a ring so why pay for something you cannot see.

    Internally flawless means that an experienced jeweller cannot see any flaws or marks when using x 10 magnification.  They can only just see something in VVS and VS stones under this magnification..  They can’t see anything when they look at them normally.  This is what is known as eye clean.  Again why pay for something you can’t see.  Some S1 stones are eye clean too or they possess a single tiny black spot can be hidden under prongs.  S2, I2 and I2 have flaws that are progressively more visible under normal viewing.  You would be very lucky indeed to get a good stone that is any of these.

    You’ll get more diamond for your budget if you shop online: Whiteflash, Good Old Gold, Brian Gavin and James Allen are all reputable.

    Good luck.

    Post # 51
    Member
    2976 posts
    Sugar bee

    @mrstattoo10816:  Sorry I managed to post twice but I think you get my drift.

    Get the very best cut you can (with GIA or AGS certification).

    Choose down to colour I if setting in white metal. 

    You can actually go down to K if setting in yellow gold.

    Choose VS1 or VS2 and you won’t see any flaws.  You can probably get S1 but make sure its eye clean or any (only just visible  under normal conditions) flaws an be hidden by prongs.

    Then buy the biggest stone your budget will allow.

    The online sellers also sell good quality rings in which to put your diamond.

    VOILA!

    Post # 52
    Member
    327 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: August 2013

    While I realize that I am going to get flack for this, I simply cannot read OP’s last comment.  The lack of sentence structure makes it confusing and dizzying to read/follow.  I know I am coming off as a snob, but we are adults here, and that is simply unintelligible.

     

    Post # 53
    Member
    491 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: April 2015

    I wouldn’t go for anything before SI grade. I had I2-I3 grade diamond stud earrings, and they were just terrible. Milky and did not have a lot of sparkle. 

     

    Post # 54
    Member
    4258 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: February 2009

    The smaller, is actually graded by the GIA or AGS as FL?  Because most stones that size are not cert’d, and I would not be interested in a non cert’d stone, especially if a jeweler is trying to charge you a premium for it by calling it FL.  I would not buy an I2 either.  If it is indeed a D FL, I may be tempted to get that one, as even small, the stats are rare.  But I also agree you should shop online.  And ideal cut F VS stone would be what I would go for.

     

     

     

    Post # 55
    Member
    965 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: October 2013

    Dont believe the hype…. Unless you have the type of diamond that has absolutely NO flaws at all, they never hold their value.  it’s just like buying a car, you buy what you like, but you will never get what you paid for them becaue the market is so saturated.  Now having said that, I probably wouldnt go any lower than I2 or SI2 on a stone becuase the integrity of the stone could be compromised, having said that,  the smaller the stone is, the harder it is to see the flaws.  I do agree that you can probably find a happy medium between the two stones.  

    Post # 56
    Member
    2976 posts
    Sugar bee

    I spent ages researching diamonds before buying a diamond. My advice is good advice from a non professional.

    My diamond is very beautiful. I bought a great diamond online for the same price as a bad diamond at the jewellers. I had my ring valued recently by a gemologist for insurance purposes and it is worth 30% more than we paid for it (and this includes shipping costs to the UK). Even if it hasn’t been worth more I would still have considered it a good deal because of the pleasure the diamond gives me..

     

    Post # 57
    Member
    2976 posts
    Sugar bee

    @imabridesmaid:  Did you enjoy my use of  punctuation?

    Here’s some more.

    ……!!!  

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