(Closed) is it normal for my puppies?

posted 5 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
837 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@Akbridezilla:  How badly are they fighting? What kind of fighting (noise, or physical throwdowns)? Do they ever get along? When they’re not fighting, do they play, or do they just exist together, pretty much ignoring each other?

 

I’ve never had dogs who acted this way. I’ve had dogs who ignore each other, but never dogs who fight (even just growling and tormenting each other without physical fights) all the time. My family has always had dogs, so in 28 years, I’ve never experienced dogs like that. But I don’t know what’s normal. Especially for litter mates. 

 

How old are they?

Post # 5
Member
837 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@Akbridezilla:  Are they spayed / neutered? My parents have one dog who wasn’t neutered until he was 7 and he was a royal jerk sometimes. Thankfully not al the time. But a fair amount. Growling at people would never have been acceptable to my parents, and he never did, but he’d growl at the other dogs. When he was neutered, his jackassery was so engrained that it didn’t stop. But he more ignores the other dogs, rather than go out of his way to growl.

Post # 6
Member
917 posts
Busy bee

What breed are they? By the sounds of it they’re fighting for dominance, which is normal. If you’re worried about it go to your vet and ask for some suggestions. Mine would be spaying or neutering them. I’ve also just started using a holistic medication on my male cat who has been showing signs of aggression, perhaps look into this too?

 

Post # 8
Member
3170 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

Are they playing or really fighting, wanting to hurt each other?

My dogs fight all the time but they are playing. They look like they are seriously fighting but we know they are just having fun. It’s completely normal. They have energy and need to get it out.

Post # 10
Member
3170 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

@Akbridezilla:  Yikes, that’s scary! Puppies have a lot more energy than you would think. Unless you really see them fighting I wouldn’t worry about it. My dogs have two completely different growl types, one for fun and one if they are serious. Unless you see them really trying to hurt each other don’t worry about it.

Do you let them run out of the house? I really hope not because that is such a scary situation for puppies. If you take them on a run every morning then their energy will drastically change.

Post # 11
Member
2607 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2009

Sounds like they might lack physical and mental stimulation, so they are making up their own games to help make up for that.  All of our dogs/foster dogs have enjoyed play fighting from time to time, and playing what I call “Eat Your Face” but if they are doing it to the point that you’re being annoyed by it, you probably need to do some work.  

Just because they are small dogs doesn’t mean they don’t need training and exercise.  Door dashing is incredibly dangerous, and could wind up with them getting hurt or killed.  So the very first thing they need to be taught is the ‘sit’ command, (if they don’t already know it), followed by the ‘wait’ command.  Wait is similiar to stay, but while stay means “stay put until I return to heel position and release you” wait means just that “wait, because something more is coming” and doesn’t require the heel position for release.  

The easiest way to teach your dog wait (and therefore, impulse control), is to do it at meal times and when giving them treats.  When it’s meal time, make them sit, and tell them to wait.  They need to hold the sit position until you give them the release word (can be whatever you want it to be, usually okay, or alright, thought many trainers advise against using these, since they are such common words in daily language and suggest using a random release word like “hotdog” or whatever word you choose).  So basically, you hold on to their bowl.  Make them sit.  Put down the bowl.  If they move before you give them their release word, correct them with a sharp “Ah!” noise and pick the bowl back up, then make them sit again.  It will take a few tries and you may not even get the bowl all the way to the ground at first.  Just keep moving the bowl back up out of their reach if their butt leaves the ground before you tell them it’s acceptable.  Don’t make them wait long at first, just a couple seconds until they have a good grasp on “wait” and the release word.  Gradually increase the length of time that you make them wait, (I am not talking hours, of course!).  

Once they have wait down, translate that to the door.  Make them sit at the door and give them the wait command.  Start to open the door.  If they budge, the door gets closed again, they get put back in the sit position.  Keep at it…you should be able to have a wide open door and dogs that won’t go through it unless you release them to do so.  If they are struggling with this, it may be easier to work with them individually first, and then together once they get it on their own.

As to the annoying levels of wrestling, more physical excersise could help.  Take them for more walks or longer walks, (or just walks in general, if you don’t already do so).  Visit a dog park if there is one near you.  Play fetch.  Introduce them to the laser pointer, (some dogs love it…we’ve had foster dogs that went nuts for it, but our dog has figured out that the red dot comes from that apparatus in our hand and is not amused).  Also, invest in some puzzle toys that make your dog use their brain to get food or treats.  

You can also try redirection…when the wrestling starts getting annoying, drag out a few toys and engage them with those instead.  Rotating your dogs’ toys can also help, (like, have a couple toys that are out for one day, a couple more for the next day, a couple more for the next…you don’t have to go crazy in the Petsmart toy aisle, but stretching out the length of time between times they get to see/play with certain toys can help them seem more exciting).  

Good luck with your pups!  

 

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