(Closed) Is it ok to have wine while pregnant ?

posted 7 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 32
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148 posts
Blushing bee

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@AlliRae:  Right on. 

Post # 33
Member
868 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

I used to have 2-3 sips of sangria at almost every family dinner which was 1-2x a month.  Didn’t hurt me or the baby

Post # 34
Member
2490 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2018

I personally don’t see anything wrong with having the odd glass of wine here and there while pregnant and if I ever get pregnant I won’t totally abstain from wine. Hard liquor and getting drunk, absolutely I won’t even consider those, but wine is fine. I’m also European though. 

Post # 35
Member
50 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: May 2014

I know your date night has passed at this point, but something that is conspiciously absent from this whole thread is any mention of your OB. Presumably you picked this doctor because you trust him/her to help you make informed decisions about your body and your baby. What does your OB think? And yes, you will get different opinions depending who you talk to, but your OB is best poised to talk through the real, scientifically validated evidence (as opposed to anecdotal evidence from people on the internet) and help you make the best choice for you and your baby.

That’s not to say that I don’t love people on the internet. <3 you, hive.

Post # 36
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3696 posts
Sugar bee

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@phoebephoebo:  Research on caffeine shows that it can cause MCs …

Not true, actually. (Not trying to pick on you, phoebephoebo, just trying to clarify something.) This gets at the difference between correlation and causation.

Research shows that caffeine is correlated with miscarriages. It does not show that it causes it. (It’s actually really, really difficult to clearly demonstrate cause-effect relationships in medical research.) Emily Block’s recent book Expecting Better does a good job of explaining this, but, in a nutshell: across the board, older women have higher average caffeine consumption than younger women. Older women are also more likely to experience miscarriages. Therefore, we have a correlation because high caffeine consumption and higher miscarriage rates both affect the same population – but it’s not at all clear that the caffeine causes the miscarriages – it’s far more likely, in fact, that they are simply due to older women being older.

SO, this is a bit of a tangent from the OP, but it’s relevant because with lots of things in pregnancy, what we know from research is a) muddy at best, and b) poorly reported by the media and often not understood all that well by the public, so we end up with these blanket prohibitions on alcohol, etc. Since we don’t know if there’s a safe cutoff level or what it is, and since there’s a good chance that if you give people an inch they might take a mile, the party line is “no alcohol at all” but the reality is a lot murkier. If you drink a small amount, slowly, with food, and the later in your pregnancy the better, there’s very little chance it will cause harm. But some people prefer the all-or-nothing approach and opt for nothing. (Emily Block’s book does a good job of explaining the research around this, too, By The Way.)

Post # 37
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2653 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 2013

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@KCKnd2:  Thank you for clarifying that!  I suppose the same could be said for (lots of) research on alcohol. The population that is taking alcohol is often taking large quantities and some are also taking drugs so very hard to get a real idea of the effecTs. I suppose my point was that people are so hard line and judgemental on alcohol and yet they are doing other things that could affect their unborn child. I don’t know! 

Post # 38
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2653 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 2013

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@KCKnd2:  By The Way, is that book worth getting?

I really want to be well informed and my my own choice the next time I get pregnant.

 

 

Post # 39
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7899 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: March 2012 - Pelican Grand Beach Resort

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@Rachel631:  Not just Brits, but almost everyone in the history of human civilization since alcohol has been added to water for the entire history of humanity since the discovery of fermentation in order to make water safe for drinking. 

Post # 40
Member
9129 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2013 - St. Augustine Beach, FL

@Tutti80:  Pretty much all of the research says a glass or two here and there won’t hurt.  Getting drunk is definitely not a good idea so take it easy.

Post # 41
Member
794 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2014

@Tutti80:  Most of the women I know who have had babies or are pregnant will say one glass of wine every once in a while is fine.  I’ve seen very responsible mothers have a small glass while pregnant.  I also have total wino friends who won’t do it because they feel guilty and can’t enjoy it while pregnant.  Aannnd, I know a girl who was a total drunk prior to being pregnant who had multiple glasses of wine on multiple occassions (way too risky and irresponsible IMOYell) and had a beautiful, healthy baby.  Do what you and your doctor are comfortable with.

Post # 42
Member
3770 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: December 1999

I didn’t have any at all in 3 pregnancies, I went with what many doctor recommended.  Quit honestly indulging in things they recommend against having wasnt worth the  worry or guilt I might have felt if something did happen. 9 months isn’t that that long,  so I avoided it.

Post # 43
Member
7976 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

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@mrsSonthebeach:  Fun fact: alcohol was used only in the Western world. In Asia, they just boiled their water. In Arab countries, they used solar stills or desert wells, which naturally filtrate the water. This is part of the reason that some Asians cannot drink alcohol at all… they are literally intolerant or allergic, and for some of them then their alcohol tolerance is low. It’s simply because evolution has not designed them to be heavy drinkers… whereas it has designed Westerners to tolerate alcohol very well.

I use the example of the UK because the US has a history of prohibition which has led people to be very uptight about alcohol. I can’t help but wonder if this is WHY FAS seems to be such a big deal there, because statistically then people with alcohol problems tend to be either the children of alcoholics or the children of teetotallers in about a similar measure. Either way, alcohol is part of the emotional currency of the household, and they never learn moderation. Anyway, I had legitimately never heard of FAS until I started reading about how it was a problem in the US, apparently. I don’t know how common it is over there, but I looked up pictures of the FAS kids and their distinctive facial features, and I have honestly never, ever seen anyone who looks like that in my life.

Both of my Grandmothers drank small beer whilst pregnant with my parents, on medical advice, and both of them drank stout whilst breastfeeding to build up their iron reserves (again, medical advice… my Grandma hates stout). By the time DH and I were born, the water was chlorinated, but many women still drank in moderation during pregnancy. Breastfeeding women were still advised to drink stout in order to prevent anaemia until quite late, I think. I don’t know whether my parents’ generation would still have received that advice or not, but it is certainly possible.  Like I say… if one drink could cause FAS, then half of my parents’ generation would have had it!

Post # 44
Member
7899 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: March 2012 - Pelican Grand Beach Resort

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@Rachel631:  I could be wrong, but I think some traditional Asian populations used other methods of fermentation as well. Not all fermentation produces alcohol, but our point is well-taken and interesting.

In America, we have a serious problem with overstating risks. I wrote my dissertation on fear mongering and so studied America’s predisposition in the media to make epidemics out of extrememly isolated events. FAS would be a good example. The “crack baby” is another.

Post # 45
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3696 posts
Sugar bee

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@phoebephoebo:  It’s pretty good – worth reading. I also really highly recommend Henci Goer and Amy Romano’s Optimal Care in Pregnancy and Childbirth.

They focus on different things – Block’s book looks at more of the “lifestyle” recommendations around pregnancy (i.e. diet, alcohol, exercise, etc.) and is written in more of a popular press/general audiences style. Goer and Romano’s book focuses more on the health care and medical practices surrounding pregnancy, labor, and birth, and it’s more academic and scientific. Both books do an excellent job of analyzing and explaining the statistics behind research findings. I do think that, in the childbirth chapter, Block doesn’t have the same depth as Goer and Romano, but other than that I liked how she approached her material.

Post # 46
Member
7976 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

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@mrsSonthebeach:  Yes! Most Asian cultures ferment rice. However, this would usually traditionally have been used ritually, as opposed to on a daily basis. It wouldn’t have been an alternative to water, for example, and not everyone would have partaken (the exception is some of the Bornean cultures, who would have drunk rice wine on a fairly regular basis… however, the rice wine they would have drunk regularly would be a lot less strong than sake, for example).

I just remembered something else… DH works with a young woman who didn’t find out she was pregnant until she was about 6 months gone. She was on the pill, she kept having periods, and she was carrying high. She only went to the doctor because she thought there was someting wrong with her innards… turns out it was her feeling baby moving. Anyway, she then freaked out because she was quite a heavy drinker and she had actually been on a hen do in Vegas during her pregnancy where she got fall-down, pass-out drunk. She had also been on a heavy drinking sand, sea and booze girls’ holiday during that time, plus she had been going to the pub several times a week. She spent the next three months petrified that she had permanently damaged the baby, in a state of constant stress.

Baby was completely fine. Moral: you have to drink a LOT to get FAS. As in… really… a LOT.

Looked up the stats… you get FAS in about 1 in 5,000 UK pregnancies.

http://www.rcm.org.uk/EasySiteWeb/getresource.axd?AssetID=112535

Compare this to Down’s Syndrome… a 30 year old woman has a 1 in 1,000 chance of having a child with Down’s. 30 is the average age for first birth in the UK.

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/downs-syndrome/Pages/causes.aspx

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