(Closed) Is it okay to put name twice on invitation?

posted 5 years ago in Paper
Post # 3
Hostess
14005 posts
Honey Beekeeper

What is your reason for not wanting to list your parents by name? I’m not saying it’s wrong, just curious! I don’t think it’s “wrong” to put your name twice, but I’m not sure if it’s necessary. Of course, that depends entirely upon your reasons. 🙂

 

Post # 4
Member
7656 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2012

Hmm, we did

Bride’s parents request the honor of your presence in the marriage of their daughter,

brides first, middle, last

to

groom’s first, middle last,

 son of parent’s names

 

Not quite in that format, but the wording anyway. I think it would work the way you have it, but the other way will be less redundant. Just a suggestion 🙂

Post # 6
Member
3697 posts
Sugar bee

I don’t think that looks weird … or, at least, I think doubling up your name looks weirdER. I think people are savvy enough to figure out the divorced-and-remarried thing on a wedding invitation.

Post # 9
Member
2216 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

My parents are still married, so on the invite it said Mr. and Mrs. John Smith.  Since your parents are divorced, could you put Mr. John Smith and Mrs. Jane Smith to distinguish Mrs. Smith #1 from Mrs. Smith #2 (your dad’s second wife)?  Just a thought…

 

Post # 10
Member
159 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

I don’t think there’s anything WRONG with it, per se, but as pp said, it’s a bit redundant. I get your point with all the Mrs & Ms Smiths on your invite, but I think most people will put two and two together. Emily Post says that if parents are divorced but sharing expenses, the mother’s name should go first:

Ms. Jane Smith

and

Mr. and Mrs. John Smith

request the honor of your presence…

 

Your guests will figure it out quickly if they don’t already know your parents are not together. If you really wanted to spell it out, you could always say “Together, Ms. Jane Smith and Mr. and Mrs. John Smith, request the honor of your presence as their daughter…”

You could also skip naming anyone if you really wanted to (and if your parents were OK with it): “The honour of your presence is requested at the marriage of Bride to Groom”

I’m straight up plagiarizing Emily Post right now, but thought it might be helpful to you 🙂

 

Post # 11
Member
4466 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: February 2012

Both mine and my husband’s parents are divorced and their names were on the invitation. This is an edited version (with names blurred and details cropped out) of our proof. 

On the left side are my mom’s name on top of my dad’s name. On the right side are his mom’s name on top of his dad’s name. I chose to have our names next to each other with an “and” in the middle as opposed to Bride TO Groom, but that works just the same. 

Post # 12
Member
1918 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

@coffeegal85:  The “and” implies that they are still married.  They would need to be listed on a separate line.

Why can’t you just say “Together with their parents”?  Or just list their names?  I think it’s just a courtesy to list your mother’s name.  No one is looking at invitation wondering what percentage each parent is paying for the wedding, but people will definitely notice if you leave her name off the invite.

Post # 13
Hostess
14005 posts
Honey Beekeeper

@LillyLover:  I think that is awesome advice! I was typing out a response but you said it so much better. 🙂

Post # 14
Member
3697 posts
Sugar bee

Not sure if this will be helpful in your situation or not, but our invitations are worded:

We joyously request

the honor of your presence at

and your participation in

the Nuptial Mass uniting …

And then we have our names in a script font, and just below each name in the other font we have “daughter/son of Mr. & Mrs. Relevant Name”

That would not be especially symmetrical in your case, but it would include both parents. FI and I like the obliqueness of the “We joyously request” wording, since (in our minds, at least) the invitation comes from all of us and emphasizes that it’s a family affair, not that certain people are hosting/paying/etc.

Post # 15
Member
2216 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

@louisianablue:  Oops.  Didn’t format.  Thanks for pointing that out.

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