(Closed) Is it Really Worth it?

posted 10 years ago in Paper
Post # 3
Member
132 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: November 2008

I was not daring enough to tackle invitations myself but did calligraphy on my envelopes myself as well as I am going to do rehearsal dinner invites, programs, menus and place cards.  I feel as though if you are going to use the printer for more things its definitely worth it but can’t really give you the advice on if its better to take them to an outside printer or DIY.  I am lucky enough to use the printer at work!

Post # 4
Member
282 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2008

I made 50 invitations myself for around $60. It is very labor intensive, but it was a really fun project and I was very proud of myself when all was said and done.

Post # 5
Member
296 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: March 2008

Ok, here’s my two cents…  I’m sure I could have gotten invitations cheeper than what I paid for my DIY ones. *However* I could not have gotten the pocket fold/multi-insert invitations that we had if I’d paid someone else to do them. If you think you’ll enjoy designing them and assembling them and you’re organized enough to get them done in a timely manner so that you’re not up all night for a week straight trying to get them finished up, then I say absolutely go for it! DIY’ing our invites was one of the most fun projects I did for our wedding. An additional advantage to doing them yourself is that it’s a lot easier to make the programs and other printed material match/complement.

As far as printing vs. having them printed, I’m a little bias because I printed them myself on a approx. $120 HP photo printer and wouldn’t have done it any other way. I’m very picky and redesigned a couple of times after I saw it printed out. Also I was able to control the color better with my own printer. But then again, I use my printer on a very regular basis and wouldn’t trade it for the world! Good luck and have fun!

Post # 6
Member
38 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: July 2008

 

I decided to make my own invites so I could get exactly what I wanted.  I am very happy with the results and received many compliments. The design process took the most time, but was also the most fun.  

Here is my cost breakdown. I was able to use a friends printer for the invite and envelope printing.

Cards n’ Pockets-Pocket folds, blank invites, invite mat and envenlopes-$121.54

Kinkos-Printing and cutting of inserts (direction card, RSVP post card, Hotel info) $61

Ribbon and glue I think about $30

Total, $212 for about 60 invites, we needed 52 but I had enough supplies for 60 (Thank goodness as two people lost their original)

 

One bit of advice, if you use Cards n’ pockets, order a sample. Their colors are a little different and you need to check your printers ability to print on off sizes. I could not use my friends printer for the inserts since they come pre-cut in unusual sizes. Hence the Kinos trip, and Kinkos won’t print on anything less than standard 8.5 x 11.  

It only took one weekend to assemble our invites. We really enjoyed the process, but it has to worth your time.

 

 

Post # 8
Member
38 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: July 2008

 

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Hi,

I did not  use the pre cut inserts. I just went to Kinkos and tried to match the card stock they had in stock. I think it was pretty close, I also just figured that as long as all of the inserts matched I didn’t really care if it perfectly matched the invite. Or you could go with a contrast on purpose, which I also thought about.

The pocketfold I used was persian, invite mat was hydrangea and the invite was white. I then used a dark blue ink for the invite printing that matched the pocketfold. I think it really brought it all together. my inserts were white cardstock and black ink. (For as many inserts as I needed, the color printing was too expensive at Kinkos)

I really liked the hydrangea and persian combo, but it’s a lot different from teal. The samples are pretty cheap. I ordered a bunch of blues and just played with the combos until i got one I liked. Maybe you could try  that. Oh and I also thought their customer service was great!

Please let me know if you have any other questions.

Post # 9
Member
60 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: October 2008 - Ceremony in a historic church, tented lawn reception at a golf and country club

it can be cheaper, but that’s assuming that everything goes perfectly and you don’t have unexpected costs. I would only DIY mine again because I prefer my style, otherwise, the headache and $ that went into them was SO not worth it! 😛

Post # 10
Member
310 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2008

I am in the midst of DIYing 80 pocketfold invites with 3 inserts. I liked the DIY option because I able to get the exact paper I wanted (I used 2 different companies), I was also able to customize the size and design of the pockefold, and added in my own personal touches in terms of design add-ons (cut-outs and outer ribbon). I also personalized all the RSVP cards for each individual guest.

That being said it was (and continues to be) VERY labour intensive – all the cutting, printing and gluing, also it was not exactally cheap. It was definitly cheaper than having someone else make the exact same invitation, but because I was making it myself and "saving" money I probably ended up adding in things that I wouldn’t have otherwise.

If you like to DIY and design then I say go for it! Just make sure you have lots of time alloted! Good luck!

Post # 11
Member
262 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2008

My Darling Husband and I made our own pocketfolds because there wasn’t really any premade ones in the orientation that we needed.  I needed a pocket and two sides for the invitation since I needed both English and Chinese and most things you can buy online only have one side for the invite.  The only invitation place that I found that did pocketfolds like the ones we wanted, wanted to charge an arm and a leg for them.  That’s why we decided to make them ourselves. 

There is no doubt that it was really really labor intensive.  However, I loved it because it did allow me to get the exact color I wanted as well as the exact design/fonts that I wanted.  I definitely saved a bundle by making them myself and I got tons of compliments on them.  I even had some people refusing to return the RSVP cards because they didn’t want to mess up the set and wanted to keep the invite. 

I agree w/the girl above.  If you have the time and won’t procrastinate and enjoy craft projects, I say go for it!

Post # 12
Member
42 posts
Newbee

I totally second bonnie on saying that if it’s a project you think you can enjoy and pull off – go for it.

I’m doing my own invites – they will be cheaper than having them made, but depending on how complex your invites are it will probably cost you a lot in labor to do it yourself. Mainly I’m doing them myself because I love handmaking something and I’m proud of the one-of-a-kind design that I’ve created.

Post # 14
Member
262 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2008

Mine had a strip of nice japanese paper on the outside and then a small diamond piece of paper with the Chinese double happiness character glued to it.  So there wasn’t anything that really held the invite closed.  I can send you a pic if you want to see it. 

If possible, I would make the ribbon slide off instead of tie as tying would create a bump and it may not make it through the post office machines without it being all mangled.  And I know there have been many stories on this board about post offices making a bride pay more because they had some bump or something that didn’t allow the invite to go through the machines. 

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