(Closed) Is putting a "newsletter" in a Christmas card a stupid idea?

posted 7 years ago in Holidays
  • poll: Is it silly, braggy or annoying?

    No-- I like to read what's been going on with people

    Yes-it seems narcissistic and no one really cares

    I

  • Post # 32
    Member
    1589 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: March 2014

    I don’t have fb and I can think of a handul of families I’d enjoy getting these letters from.

    Post # 34
    Member
    10635 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: January 2011

    I love getting them, but I have never sent one out, and I probably never will.

    Post # 35
    Member
    9680 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper

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    @Mrs_Amanda:  You Americans and your crazy ideas 😀 

    My hypothetical newsletter would be full of dog pictures. I’m sure that is only exciting to me, lol. 

    Post # 36
    Member
    5658 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: August 2012

    I don’t think there’s anything narcissistic about it. It’s just that some pepole enjoy it and some don’t. I swear when I was younger this was the normal thing to do for EVERYone, and now barely anyone does it. If most of your family lives far from you and you rarely see them I see nothing wrong with a little letter letting them know what’s been going on in your lives!

    Post # 37
    Member
    2066 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: February 2014

    I kinda think it’s odd but maybe it’s a regional thing? I just feel like if you’re only going to send it to 8 people, why wouldn’t you just write that info in the body of the Christmas card? Much more personal and less… braggy I guess?

    Post # 39
    Member
    13653 posts
    Honey Beekeeper

    IMO there is no letter that can possibly be appropriate to send to each and every person on your list. I always find myself distracted by thinking wow, that vacation sounded like a blast, and I’m so happy for you that your children are amazing, but did you really send this letter to everyone on your list, including no doubt people going through their own  financial and personal challenges?   Wouldn’t it be a lot more  appropriate to send a note saying you are thinking about them and then connecting during the year in a way that is more personal? 

    Etiquette frowns on mass mailed newsletters for those reasons. 

    Post # 40
    Member
    10450 posts
    Sugar Beekeeper
    • Wedding: February 2014

    View original reply
    @Mrs_Amanda:  Yah I have seen quite a few bees sending out Christmas cards, but it’s just not like that here so it must be all about where you are! For what it’s worth, I always read the letters my parents get (if it’s someone I know, or know their adult kids) when I’m at their house. Bonus points if there are pictures. 

    Post # 42
    Member
    8683 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: September 2013

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    @MrsPanda99:  I’ve also never heard of this. I will be honest….if I did receive one I would probably stop reading after the first paragraph. If you don’t speak to me all year then no need for a long update.

    Post # 44
    Member
    8683 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: September 2013

    View original reply
    @Mrs_Amanda:  I think people like a grandma or an older aunt would love it

    Post # 45
    Member
    2478 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: May 2013

    I’d still always opt for something that is clearly personal to the recipient – even if this does involve a modest amount of copy and paste. Only it is incredibly difficult to send Round Robins that don’t come across as somewhat self-obsessed.

    Having said that, they can make absolutely hilarious reading. Every year I am required to read aloud (in an Australian accent) the circular letter my cousin sends out on behalf of her family in New South Wales.

    We are treated to a list of all the random, consumer items they have purchased across the year – presumably she assumes we are all too deprived and impoverished to invest in a Dyson vacuum cleaner – as well as an excruciating report of the doings of her three grown up daughters. This latter bragfest making rather sad reading since one of her daughters has clearly failed to live up to expectations and my cousin makes no bones about revealing her disappointment.

    So we learn that while *Anastasia has become Employee of the Year and had her penthouse apartment featured in a magazine, Hermione has single-handedly discovered the Higgs bosun particle and will almost certain win a Nobel Prize for brains and beauty, poor Sharon is still “just working at the bakery and living in a bedsit room downtown”.

    It makes entertaining reading but heck, it is no way to embarass your family.

    *Names have been changed to protect the innocent and the disappointing.

     

    Post # 46
    Member
    13653 posts
    Honey Beekeeper

    View original reply
    @Mrs_Amanda:  The “new” Emily Post Institute is considered very liberal in the etiquette world. More traditional sources, such as Miss Manners feel that anyone who is close enough to warrant such a detailed and intimate  account of your life  generally deserve more than a once a year group newsletter. And anyone who is not that close rarely requires a “full account” to “satisfy curiosity they may not have.”

    That all said, some of these letters are worse than others.  You graduated, had a baby, you moved and here is your new address, not bragging. Being so “proud” of little Ava, , who got all As, your H’s promotion, your expensive renovations,  or your 10 trips around the world this year, maybe not so much. 

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