(Closed) Job Searching… Tips of the trade?

posted 8 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
14496 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

Send thank you letters after interviews.  Very few people do this these days and it will set you apart.

Post # 5
Member
4385 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

Do your research about the company, and when they ask if you have any questions at the end, ask intelligent ones!! Don’t ask stuff like “What’s the pay? How much vacation do I get?”, etc. Ask questions that show you’re interested in the job, ie “I noticed on your website that you offer such and such a program, how easy is it to get involved in that?”.

Post # 6
Member
14496 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

Another tip I read recently (sorry just remembered).  Nails – manicured short with a suttle color.  It’s a subliminal thing as people usually talk with their hands.

Post # 7
Member
4385 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

I’m also a fan of asking the interviewer, “What would you say is your favorite part of working for this company?”. They should be trying to sell the job to you as much as you’re trying to sell yourself to them 🙂

Post # 8
Member
14186 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

I have found that mentioning what I want to do, in the future, that would benefit the company, shows that you are dedicated. For instance, part of my cover letter to my current company included my desire for an aerospace materials engineering masters degree. Did i get one? No. Did i really want one? Not really–i wasn’t sure WHAT i wanted my masters in. BUT, it aligned with the company’s needs. Did showing i was willing to go the extra mile help? Yes, definitely. It came up during my interview. “not being educated enough” is always something you can improve on. One of my calculus teachers used to hire people at a major company and said that is the #1 thing you should say is your “weakness”. He said things like “i’m a perfectionist” basically means “i’m an uptight bitch and nobody will want to work with me”. He’s right–I certainly wouldn’t want to work with someone like that =]

Also, when I did a phone interview, I’d ask for a few seconds to think about my answer (instead of going “ummmmm….welll….”) and set the phone down (no pressure, right? Out of sight, out of mind), think about what i wanted to say, pick the phone back up and THEN answer. I was later told by the person who hired me that the way I conducted my phone interview spoke a lot about me and he was really impressed.

For newer graduates, i’ve been told many times that if you omit your GPA from the education portion of your resume, it looks like you have something to hide. I’ve also heard that if you have an under 3.0, you should exclude it simply because it is a poor GPA, but I think it just bites you in the butt, no matter what. Then again, one of DH’s cousin is a social worker and was shocked to find out GPA is important, so this may be field dependent….for technical fields, GPA can set you apart. Maybe in social work, everybody comes out about the same and the emphasis is on volunteer work, so if volunteer work is important, do it! It wasn’t even a factor for my position. I guess what I’m saying is play to the strengths of the position. Leadership and social skills were biggies for me.

You should really invest in having your resume looked over by a professional. It costs money, but it is SO SO worth it. I’ve had my resume worked over a few times by people who are paid to do this by my company, and it always amazes me how much tweaking they can do and how much BETTER it sounds. I bolded it because I truly believe it is that important. I work career fairs for my company and it’s embarassing to see some of these self-written resumes.  I sent my husband’s resumes to like, 3 upper level executives at my company who do major hiring and had them tweak his a little, too. If you know anybody personally, ask them to take a look.

Post # 11
Member
7975 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

Add me to the list of those looking :/ and rather unsuccessfully! Jobs in the past for me have always been through word of mouth, which has been really tough when moving to a city I’ve never lived in before (J lives here).

Best thing I’ve found so far is to ask for help. Our church network sent out my resume to several people and J is sending it out to some of his better connected acquaintances too, and I’ve gotten more interest from one day of them sending it out than 2 months of applying everywhere I could think of!

Post # 13
Member
14186 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

Is there a position coming up at your new job that you could have your executive director look at your resume for? Double duty!

The old “you have to know somebody” thing doesn’t really work anymore. At my company of like, 150,000 people, i’ve tapped into every resource I can think of and can’t get Darling Husband a job at my company. I think the days of THAT are relatively behind us!!! Sucks.

Job fairs? Head hunter agencies? Most companies do online hiring and they use “key words” for resumes. Tailor your resume for the job your applying to. Hit all the main points in the post; they’re filtered by computer for the most part. The goal is to get a person to actually read your resume

Post # 15
Member
2703 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

agree with the PP above…

for the antiquated question of “what is your flaw, or weak point”… or “what you can you improve on”  BE HONEST. i mean don’t make yourself out to be a horrible person, but don’t do the “my biggest flaw is that i’m an overachiever and i take on a lot of work…” all the positive spin “flaws” have been played out through every HR department (believe me i know, i work for a HR Consulting firm).

make sure you are well informed, and ask questions when they ask you about what your interests/goals are… more than just ” i need a new job ” but show enthusiasm about the job, company, etc.

old statment, but still rings true: EYE CONTACT IS KEY

if you need help with resume reviewing; i can do it for ya 🙂 i’ve become a pro between my FI’s and my resumes… and my best friend is a recruiter; so she knows how to present in a way that catches their attn from the other side.

as far as job boards… in my 4 months of unemployment last summer; all of the top responses i got were from companies that i applied directly through their corporate sites. i also went to one job fair and passed out my resumes… (honestly, it was a lot of waiting and although i did get feedback and got business cards… i don’t know that i’d go to one again).

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