(Closed) 'Juicing' for breakfast and lunch and healthy eating for dinner?

posted 6 years ago in Wellness
Post # 17
Member
11231 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

@stefanielovesjamie:  You can have more than that, but yes, a cup a day is fine.

@SnoopDog:  A liquid diet will fuck up your digestion pretty badly, if sustained long-term. If you do it long enough, you’ll end up with diarrhea and no solid bowel movements. That’s why children/babies can’t sustain breastfeeding only and need to have solids introduced. You can absolutely have smoothies (like what the OP posted, where you actually blend the food itself, not just squeeze the juice out), but NOT all the time.

I’ve had to argue about that before–someone tried to tell me that prepackaged “nutrition” shakes (like Ensure) are good for you, and that a liquid diet CAN be sustained, because how do you explain coma patients? If you read the label on a bottle of Ensure, the first four ingredients are water and different sugars, not actual nutrition. And coma patients need a minimum amount of nutrients (because they’re only exerting a minimum amount of calories, so you don’t want weight gain), but I’ve never seen a healthy-looking coma patient.

Post # 18
Member
746 posts
Busy bee

@juliana192:  Oooh, that salad sounds delish.  I regularly make a side salad of spinach, strawbs, teaspoon of balsamic vinagrette, red bell pepper and toasted walnuts.  Never thought of adding chicken to it!  

Post # 19
Member
1252 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

@vorpalette:  Gotcha! I only use it as a supplement to my diet! I would never rely on juice alone to sustain my body, that’s for sure. I agree with you, Ensure is such bs. It will just give you another sugar spike and no nutritional value! 

Post # 20
Member
9818 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

There’s absolutely no way I could live on that diet.

I think juicing should be used to supplement whole foods, personally.  Some people might use juicing as a diet jump-start but that should be short-term.  Not a lifestyle.

I don’t juice but I’ve done plenty of green/fruit smoothies.  I like those because I get all the fiber along with the nutrients.  Fiber keeps you FULL!

Some people seem to be fine on more paleo type diets but I’m not one of those people.  I really need carbs to be satisfied and workout (I run, bike, etc).  I just try to pick the healthy ones (brown rice, beans, whole grains, etc).

And I’d be terribly bored with your dinner.  It just sounds sad and boring to me.  There is nothing wrong with spices.  Plenty of spices are really good for you!  I understand watching the pre-made marinades that are full of preservatives and sugar…but you can make your own that would be very healthy! 

I would add some nuts/nut butters and olive oil to your diet as well.  I love pb banana smoothies!

You want to make sure you’re getting enough calories too…you might not be.  That can slow down your metabolism and put you into starvation-mode, where your body clings on to your fat.

Post # 21
Member
11231 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

@kes18:  OMG pb chocolate banana smoothie. We make ours with half a banana, a couple handfuls of baby spinach, plain Greek yogurt (or just plain yogurt), dark chocolate almond milk, and chocolate protein powder. YUM. We love the PB&C shake at Coldstone (with a banana added), but that’s several thousand calories. Our version isn’t quite the same, but it’s really tasty.

Post # 22
Member
327 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2014 - Excalibur

I  do this. I  use a Bullet though as I’ve read a lot of nutrition is in the skin.  Here is what I make:  one cup of water, 1 tbsp  flax seed, 1 tbs  almond butter or natural peanut butter, 1/2  cup spinach, 1 banana,  and whatever  kind of berries I  have.

Post # 23
Member
9818 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

@vorpalette:  I’ve bought regular almond milk before but never though of getting the chocolate to make pb banana chocolate smoothies.  That is such a good idea!  I’m going to have to pick some up next time I go grocery shopping!

Post # 24
Member
1998 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

@stefanielovesjamie:  Since the other ladies have already given you so much useful advice, I’ll limit myself to one thing. 

I don’t know about you but I’m wired in a way that goes “oh, if I drink it, it’s not food” – so I would be perfectly capable of downing a drink or a smoothie with loads of calories and still be hungry! My brain simply would not process that as “food” and would file it under “drink” instead and send a growling signal to my stomach. Not cool! I would much rather chew on carrot sticks – the chewing part makes me feel like I’ve actually eaten something! 🙂 

Again, maybe it’s just how I’m wired but I thought I’d share if it helps at all.

Good luck with your healthy lifestyle 🙂 

Post # 25
Member
645 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

I’m a firm believer in juicing based on my own life. I’m currently pregnant and having a very difficult time with MS so juicing isn’t currently as large a part of my diet as I’d like but for the past maybe 4 years(???) I’ve been really into juicing, but I don’t/didn’t only juice, prior to pregnancy it was basically a tea in the morning when I woke up, green juice for breakfast which would tide me over until I had my healthy lunch, then I’d have another juice for afternoon snack, and then a healthy dinner. I would also do a juice “fast” once every week, usually on Mondays since I would tend to get a suger overload on the weekends. It worked for me because I felt so much better, Darling Husband tried it with me for about a month and said he wanted to die so yeah I think it has to be what personally works for you and your body.

Post # 26
Member
1352 posts
Bumble bee

@SnoopDog:  Adult women do not need this much protein. They need about 46g/day. An egg has 13g, so per your recommendation, you’d be getting above the required amount by breakfast. There is insufficient evidence for the effects of excess protein (it’s been associated with both negative and positive health outcomes), my point is that that’s not what you should be worrying about.

I agree with @DaisyBelle:  about the legumes. I’d be worried about your high ratio of animal to vegetable proteins, which correlates with bone loss, hip fracture and diabetes (look up Sellmeyer et al.: A high ratio of dietary animal to vegetable protein increase the rate of bone loss and the risk of fracture in postmenopausal women; Sluijs et al.: Dietary intake of total, animal, and vegetable protein and risk of type 2 diabetes)

Also SnoopDog is right about the carbs. I’m not sure those vegetables would be enough. Try using a macronutrient/micronutrient calculator to see if your diet is adequate. It’s hard to assess your diet this way. 

Maybe you could consider blending instead of juicing. You are losing a lot of fibre by juicing, and given your lack of grains, you may not be getting enough. Fibre is super important! 🙂

Good luck on your lifestyle change!

Post # 27
Member
263 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Anything that feels restrictive or too much like a diet won’t be sustainable. Juicing is fine here and there, but what you’re doing is stripping the fruit/veg of all the healthy plant-based fiber. When you juice, you’re taking in more sugar/carbs than you would be if you just ate the fruits and vegetables. If you’re looking for something that’s easy to maintain and doesn’t feel like a diet, go for healthy fats like full fat, grassfed dairy and meats and fresh fruits and vegetables that are in season. Just stay away from anything that contains refined white sugar and flour, corn syrup, or pretty much anything with more than 4-5 ingredients on the label.

Also, when you start feeling more comfortable with exercising, add some weights. Girls aren’t built to get bulky, if you’re worried about that, but women need to lift weights as it enhances our bone density (since we’re more likely to have Osteoporosis. Good luck!

Post # 28
Member
1252 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

@arathella:  I do hardcore weight training 5-6 days a week, so I can’t imagine getting just 46 g of protein a day. It is way too low to feed my muscles, not to mention grow more! I have also come across research ( bodybuilding.com is my favorite website when it comes to strength training and weightl loss tips) that stresses the importance of eating protein to promote weight loss. I remember when I wasn’t eating enough protein, I was always feeling hungry! Constantly! No matter how much veggies/fruits/carbs I ate, I was always starving without my meat! But it is very interesting that you said adult women don’t need much protein. I gotta read some more research then. I was always in the camp the more the better!

 

Post # 29
Member
1776 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

Previous posters gave a lot of good info.  I just wanted to add, no need to cut out spices on your chicken, just don’t add salt.  There are tons of other flavor options that you can have that will not be unhealthy for you.  Healthy does not need to equal flavorless or boring.  (Unless you just happen to really like completely plain chicken, then disregard LOL!).  It looks to me like you need some more protein in your diet.  Also, avocados have a lot of fat in them, yes most of it is good fat, but make sure it’s not too concentrated in each meal (this will also depend on the size, if you are having full California avocados or small Mexico/Fl ones).

Post # 31
Member
815 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@stefanielovesjamie:  I think it’s OK to do the juice or a fruit smoothie or something along those lines for breakfast.  That’s what I do, but I do add some protein with flax milk or almond butter to it which really helps.  I do tend to crave some protein a few hours later so I think it’s important to keep healthy snacks around & if you’re not adding protein to your breakfast, it’s good to have some fairly early in the day or you may get really tired or hungry.

I feel like as long as you’re varrying things and getting a ton of veggies & protein, you should be fine.  I would say that getting to the gym at least a few times a week will make a huge difference and will probably feel great!  I always tell people to set fairly low goals to start excercise if you have a hard time with motivation.  For example, if I tell myself I have to spend an hour or two at the gym, I may find some great excuses not to go.  But if I say I only have to do 20 or 30 minutes, it’s a little easier to feel motivated & I always end up staying a lot longer anyway.  That could also mean telling yourself you’re going to go on a short walk, etc.  And if you do end up doing only 20 minutes, you have acheived your goal & don’t have to feel bad and it’s 20 minutes more than you would have done if you didn’t go at all.

And lastly, I say listen to your body.  There is a point when we really need to use self control, but if you feel good, stick with it.  If you feel tired or weak after a while, make some adjustments.  Good luck!

 

The topic ‘'Juicing' for breakfast and lunch and healthy eating for dinner?’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors