(Closed) Just curious… if money was not a problem, would you still consider moissanite?

posted 7 years ago in Rings
Post # 106
Member
1513 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

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pinkkkbunny:  I’ve just seen previous post about possible worries with the Amora Gem or moissy (e.g., funky color or oil stain). I encourage you do a little more research than that poster did. I too originally discounted moissy because of the color issues reported, then I found out that these issues are nonexistent in new moissanite because they’ve improved the way they grow the crystals. So I almost ended up back to diamonds before I gathered more info and got the full story. Same for the oil stain issue, if you dig a bit you’ll see this is very rare and an easy fix. Even if it wasn’t an easy fix, moissanites come with a lifetime guarantee.

There’s a lot of misinformation out there about moissy and it would’ve been sad for me personally if I hadn’t given it a second chance! Also natural diamonds aren’t exempt from problems either, if anything you have a greater risk of problems with natural diamonds because there’s a wider variety of quality and you can have issues with inclusions causing breaks in the stone, etc. On balance I think moissy or the Gem are safer bets in terms of avoiding hassle. Obviously if you prefer diamond for whatever reason, go with that, but don’t discount moissy or the Gem because of misinformation!

Post # 108
Member
1883 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

I have no desire to wear a moissy, they just do not interest me. I would wear a ruby, sapphire, emerald, morganite, or some other natural gem rather than a moissy, amora, or other man made stone. It all comes down to your personal preference, and that of your Fiance as he is the one who is making the purchase… 

Post # 109
Member
1354 posts
Bumble bee

If money were no problem, I’d have much different priorities than the stone in my wedding ring. But, I have a diamond, and the size is perfectly fine with me

Post # 111
Member
446 posts
Helper bee

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valintine:  thank you for the reply, though to be honest, your passive aggressive tone in the first paragraph was not recieved well. Forgive me if I have misinterpreted you, or if my original query to you seemed aggressive/attacking. It was not meant to be.

Though I respect your opinion, I’m going to have to politefully disagree that wearing a diamond simulant does not necessarily promote the diamond industry. If even one person buys a diamond in reaction to having seen your (“your” is used here as a general “you”, not directly referring to yourself) ring, you have inadvertently advertised for the diamond industry and essentially you will have contributed monetarily, albeit indirectly, to said industry. 

Post # 112
Member
959 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

  • This reply was modified 6 years, 10 months ago by Syzygy88.
  • This reply was modified 6 years, 10 months ago by Syzygy88.
  • This reply was modified 6 years, 10 months ago by Syzygy88.
Post # 113
Member
1746 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2017

Syzygy88:  there are human rights violations with the lab stones as well diamonds. Moissanite is cut faceted in China (no issues there right! ha ha) and many moissanite pieces are assembled in other poor countries too. In addition, lab and factory made products make environmental waste . The metal our jewelry is made of also has issues. Having a lab stone is much cheaper but not necessarily a more ethcal choice and as someone else pointed out, it encourages the look of the stone it is imitating.  I’ll have a moissanite initally but I’m not under any illusions that I’m making a more ethical choice than someone with a diamond or any thing else

Regarding the moissanite stain, many people have issues with that. Noone wants to have to use special cloths, metal cleaner and elbow grease to try to get a stain off their beautiful stone. I’vse seen complaints on this forum and on other forums. The stain IS a problem. Have read recently that someone with the Amora Gem got a similar stain as well.

 

 

Post # 115
Member
7936 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 1997

There are ethical issues with the clothing you wear, the food and animals you eat (if you are not vegan), the vehicles you drive, the shoes you wear, the bags you carry, and the metal that holds your stone (whatever it might be). There are ethical issues every time you flip a light switch, and everytime you check your phone for messages. So please tell me you are perfect and grow your own cotton, make your own yarn, make your own clothing, walk everywhere you go, eat only local and organic and live with only the electricity generated from your own windmill.

I am not perfect, nor do I pretend to be. But it seems I have a very long way to go to reach the ethical heights of some others here…

Post # 116
Member
1513 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

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girlseeksring:  I see what you’re saying, but this argument only works if you don’t believe in personal responsibility. If a single person buys a non-fairtrade banana because they saw me eating my fairtrade banana, am I indirectly supporting unethical food production? No. I bought a fairtrade banana, my money went to support what I think is the better choice. If somebody eschews fairtrade after seeing my banana, that’s on them. Am I contributing to blood diamonds because I wear a gem that looks like a diamond, or a diamond that’s ethically produced? No. If somebody else wants a diamond, it’s that person’s responsibility to research the ethics of their stone or if there’s a better alternative.

I also just want to add that I do not think my gemstone choice makes me an exceptionally moral person, bwahaha! The mined diamond thing is simply one of my own moral lines. And I’ve drawn this line not only because of human rights violations, I have personal reasons for having a really big problem with blood diamonds and believing them to be worse than other questionably ethical products/services/etc. But I also do plenty of things other people consider immoral — I wear leather, I buy tons of stuff made in China, hell I work on the Sabbath! I do all these things and more with a clear conscience, because I think they’re acceptable choices for me personally. Other people have different moral limits and that’s ok. I’m also ok with my friends having diamonds, even though I wish they weren’t bloody. I certainly don’t think I’m better or more ethical than my friends because I no longer buy mined diamonds.

Oh and didn’t mean to come off passive aggressive in pp, I honestly was surprised and laughing out loud. 

Eta: I also just have to add that you’re like the most polite, well-spoken Bee ever! Welcome and congrats on your engagement. 

  • This reply was modified 6 years, 10 months ago by .
Post # 117
Member
1513 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

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echomomm:  I actually think that someone who grows their own food, etc., is less perfect — ethically speaking — than somebody who lives in a city and buys food grown in another country. But that’s a different conversation…

Post # 118
Member
461 posts
Helper bee

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pinkshoes:  I hear what you’re saying… but what I was trying to say that even if I had all the money in the world, and had all that money to donate, I would _still_ probably feel weird about having really expensive things. It would still be money tied into an object. That’s just my personality… I like nice things but I get self conscious if it’s “too nice” lol. I’m weird. Who knows, if I’m ever uber rich I’ll have a more educated answer!

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