Just for fun: (Not so) Common Knowledge

posted 6 years ago in The Lounge
Post # 107
Member
547 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

@charmedbee:  Lol, I think it’s the fault of the media! A lot of times they’re used interchangeably, but they’re definitely two different things. A heart attack can LEAD to cardiac arrest, but they aren’t the same thing.

 

@KatiePi:  The whole “they’re not dead until they’re warm and dead” thing doesn’t apply to every patient. This refers more so to patient’s who are in a hypothermic environment, so for example a patient who was in a cold body of water, or when they’re trying to determine brain death in a patient who was purposefully cooled. But your average code brought into the ER, this isn’t really a factor. Same with patients who have been dead for a few hours (or even longer of course). They’ll start to get cold, but you don’t have to warm them again in order to pronounce them dead.

 

@Redroc_13:  Actually, the point of defibrillation IS to restart the heart. The whole point of defibrillation/AEDs is to stop the chaotic electrical activity, or “stun” the heart, and hope that it restarts and does what it’s supposed to. I get what you’re saying about regulating a heartbeat, but that’s not exactly correct. Restarting it IS correct however.

Post # 108
Member
3773 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

I’m an esthetician. Dry skin lacks oil. Dehydrated skin lacks water (moisture). Dry skin can be perfectly hydrated. Oily skin can be dehydrated.

Overuse of oil-control products can cause excess oil production. Similarly, overuse of moisturizing products can overdry already dry skin.  

Post # 109
Member
4424 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: December 2013

@PaisleyMedic:  Yeah, you’re right. That’s what I was thinking about. There was an episode of Grey’s Anatomy where a patient was hypothermic and they pronounced him “dead”. My mom was annoyed lol.

Post # 110
Member
116 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: August 2014

@Regina Phalange:  I could never figure out that “work cut out for you” phrase! Thank you for explaining it.

 

This thread is making me feel like I need to read some books! I don’t think I have any random knowledge.

Post # 111
Member
645 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@HeartsandSparkles:  YES! I knew about this a long time ago, but the Smithsonian magazine did something on this last year!

Post # 112
Member
294 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 2014

@PaisleyMedic I think what @Redroc_13 was referring to was asystole – when flatline occurs. It drives me crazy in movies/television when they shock asystole. That is not possible – it is not a shockable rhythm! ACLS algorithms would indictate use of meds (ex: epinephrine, vasopressin) and compressions with pulse checks. If the patient was in a disorganized rhythm like ventricular fibrillation, then yes, shock away! With asystole, there’s nothing to defibrillate.

I saw Lone Survivor recently with my former Marine husband (AMAZING movie) – they were so careful to get the details correct and maintain accuracy (slight spoiler alert) – and then final scene… again with shocking the asystole.

Post # 113
Member
547 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

@sweetpea3363:  Yeah, that’s what I meant when I said I get what you’re saying about regulating a heartbeat, but that’s not exactly correct. I figured that was probably what she was referring to. I agree it’s still obnoxious when they shock asystole. Medical shows show grossly incorrect procedures all the time, and I usually just let them go and try to not get annoyed.

I was just correcting that the point of an AED/defibrillation IS to restart the heart, because Redroc said that it wasn’t. 

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