(Closed) Just for fun…would you want to live in a really old house? (150+ years old)

posted 6 years ago in Home
  • poll: Would you want to live in a really old house? (150+ years old)

    Yes, I would love to!

    I would want to if it wasn't creepy or in really bad shape.

    No thanks.

  • Post # 16
    Member
    466 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: October 2015

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    mkat37:  I probably would have liked it more if my SO at the time (ex FI) was half as knowledgeable as he THOUGHT he was about renovations. We ended up having to knock out some of that overhang because we couldn’t exchange the box spring we already bought for a two-piece one (questionable tactic on ex’s part….I hope it caused problems after I left….thats terrible….i shouldn’t say that….oh well). We had an ancient claw-foot tub which was beautiful but was a giant pain when we replaced the bathroom flooring with tile…..ugh….

    Post # 17
    Member
    569 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: November 2013

    My DH and I live in a house built in 1814, and I love it! It has its challenges, but it also has so much charm and an interesting history (built originally by a big mill family in the town, and then was a church rectory for many decades)!

    Post # 18
    Member
    88 posts
    Worker bee
    • Wedding: December 2000

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    Magpie86:  That sounds so beautiful!!!!!!!

    I would love to see pictures if you feel comfortable sharing! Totally understand if you don’t. We were going to look at an old church that was converted into a house, but our realtor scared us with re-sale worries. 

    I still think about it 

    Post # 19
    Member
    312 posts
    Helper bee

    I would never live in one, but that is because I grew up in a haunted house (built in the 1910’s) and it was pretty creepy. My mother always made us look at old farm houses and there was one in particular that she almost bought that was almost as creepy as our house at the time. Fortunately we ended up in a 1960’s ranch haha.

    That having been said, I currently live in a house that was built in 1927 by my SO’s great grandparents that he completely redid. I know for a fact his grandfather died in it, but I have no creepy feelings what so ever!

    Post # 20
    Member
    569 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: November 2013

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    privatequestions:  Ah!! That sounds awesome! DH was also not thrilled about resale isues given the age of our home, but I pointed out that I want to live in it forever 🙂 haha.

    Our house isn’t as unique/cool looking as some rectories, probably because it wasn’t originally built to be a rectory. I don’t have many pictures on my computer (we just moved in a couple months ago), but here is one of the outside:

     

    I also really love the ceiling in the dining room…this is a picture from the listing that doesn’t do it justice, but it’s really ornate. It was tin, originally, and I’d love to restore that, but am afraid to totally ruin it.

    There’s also fun things like old pocket doors, hidden cabinets, some stained glass, etc. The attic isn’t finished, but is huge with a really cool layout and an eyebrow window. I’m dying to finish it and turn it into a library/family room–someday! 🙂

    Post # 21
    Member
    360 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: June 2015

    Nope. Too many hidden costs and updating with old homes, IMO.  I like my house modern and clean! And ghost free, lol.

    Post # 22
    Member
    1846 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: July 2016

    OMG I love old brick farmhouses like these!

     

    I love looking at them when I’m driving in the middle of nowhere.

    Post # 23
    Member
    1451 posts
    Bumble bee

    That second one is gorgeous! Most of the houses in my neighborhood are early 1900’s.  The one my dh and I bought is from 1901 and I love it!  Surprisingly, he and my younger brother got our CA king mattress up to the finished attic (our bedroom) with not much trouble.

    Post # 24
    Member
    4061 posts
    Honey bee

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    rel318:  I grew up in a 100 year old house, and my parents also have a farm house in new england that dates back to 1767. I absolutely love the charm, architecture, and history that comes with an old house and I would live in one in a heartbeat over something new.

    Post # 25
    Member
    7976 posts
    Bumble Beekeeper
    • Wedding: July 2013 - UK

    The house I grew up in was built in 1903, and the one I currently live in was built in 1890. I also lived in a very old house for a time which was built in the very early 1800s.

    The most recently built house I ever lived in was a flat built in the late 1970s. I also lived in a shared house dating from about 1930.

    I didn’t find differences in maintainance/repair at all. A well maintained house is a well maintained house… we have had to do a lot of work on our house, but that’s because a DIY nut tried to do it up in the early 2000s, so we are basically having to rip out everything he did and redo it properly.

    The quality of the build is definitely better in older houses, IME. No sticking problems to deal with, either.

    Post # 26
    Member
    233 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: Banquet hall

    I would buy either of those in a flash! Aside from foundations, anything else can be dealt with. I grew up in a 1890s Victorian farm house and I’m slowly mourning the dream of buying a historical home. Fiance and I are being relocated to a newer Southern city where “new new new” is preferred and many of the older homes have been torn down for new construction. Anything old enough to survive the “purge” is two to three times anything we’ll every be able to afford. “Old” houses in are price range are Korean War-era base housing…sorry but no lol.

    What I love about older east coast houses is the emphasis on the kitchen as a great room. You don’t find that in the South because they don’t want to keep the extra heat like northern households, and newer construction often has kitchens that are open to a great room, but a living room rather than a dining area.

    Fiance and I will probably build to mimic an older northern house to suit our tastes and needs. I do wish I could give TLC to an older home like the ones you posted though! What a dream! At my parents, I always washed the wood floors by hand and repainted all the crown moulding myself. New woods floors don’t have nothin’ on original hardwoods. I have laminate and it’s just not the same. Plaster work, resashing windows, etc. all take dedication, but in my experience the maintenance on an older home can be very cost effective. For instance, if a window pane breaks, you only replace a small pane, not the whole thing. Storm windows and screens are replaced in the same manner. Bathroom fixtures are usually indestructible piping, not the PVC piping that’s prone to cracking or leaking in harshly cold weather. Same thing with replacing patches of plaster instead of entire sheets of dry wall.

    As to your concerns about spirits and such, you will know the second you walk into a house whether the energy is good or bad. If you’re concerned, ask to read the abstract for the house. For an eastern state, the abstract should include land titles back to the original colonial land patent. With a little digging, and perhaps some help from a historian, you should be able to trace the families that lived there and check for any deaths on the property, strange incidents, etc. I actually traced the house I grew up in. The first boy who lived there was born precisely 100 years before me!

    Good luck with your house hunt! 1900 is a perfect year between modernization and older construction!

    Post # 27
    Member
    2702 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: September 2012

    I love old houses! The are I live in has a bunch built in the 1700 and 1800’s and maybe some even earlier.  I don’t believe in ghosts or anything so I wouldn’t worry about it being haunted. However I would worry about the repairs and updates that would eventually need to be taken care of. So I would only buy an old house if I could comfortably afford tomproperly care for it.

    Post # 28
    Member
    233 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: Banquet hall

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    Magpie86:  What a gorgeous house! Don’t forget, tin ceilings were originally installed to be painted so they looked like hand-sculpted plaster work! So, technically, it’s original if you never do more than a new coat of paint 

    Post # 29
    Member
    1341 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: April 2015

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    rel318:  My current place was built in 1880, so I clearly like older places. They can be a lot of work to maintain and keep up, but they have so much charm. Some people might think it’s creepy, but I think of the stories that the walls hold.

    Post # 30
    Member
    226 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: July 2015 - Industrial/Modern

    The house we just purchased was built in 1910. We lucked out in that the former owners painstakingly restored (original moldings, floors, fire places, vents etc) and upgraded the house (windows, insulation, wiring, a/c… The basement is bone dry.) Any work we have to do is purely cosmetic and fun.. My house prior to this was a new build and that one couldn’t hold a candle to the solidness and character of my current home. 

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