(Closed) Just for fun…would you want to live in a really old house? (150+ years old)

posted 6 years ago in Home
  • poll: Would you want to live in a really old house? (150+ years old)

    Yes, I would love to!

    I would want to if it wasn't creepy or in really bad shape.

    No thanks.

  • Post # 46
    Member
    2356 posts
    Buzzing bee

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    bkrocks13:  Ugghh. that is a travesty. I hate it when I read things like this. It’s like why even bother getting an old home?

     

    Post # 47
    Member
    1606 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: October 2013

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    VictorianChick:  A travesty is that the current owner covered the entire house in 10 layers of (now sticky and gummy) circa 1978 chocolate brown paint.  Stripping the paint off of all of the original fixtures will be tens of thousands of dollars and weeks worth of time if it’s even possible.  If we end up with the property, we’ll try to save what we can but all of the architects I’ve spoken to advised me to plan to replace versus restore with the exception of the stairs, any interesting doors and the fireplaces (if there are any.) 

    Post # 48
    Member
    1606 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: October 2013

    Also we could do without the asbestos, leaky radiators, lack of appropriate voltage for a modern house, oil-burning furnace…

    Post # 49
    Member
    706 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: March 2013

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    rel318:  my house isn’t nearly that old but it is from 1930! I love the character it has. We put a lot of work into it. We had the original wood floors refinished, painted the entire house, re tiled the the ppm shower and floor. It was so worth it though!

    The noises can be creepy but it’s all part of the house lol. Although I could live without my front door (original solid oak) opening on it’s own when it’s unlocked. It’s like a ghost coming in and out haha. 

    Post # 50
    Member
    343 posts
    Helper bee
    • Wedding: May 2015

    omggg that first house is AMAZING. It’s my dream to live in an antique house. I love the ch arm and history. When my Fiance and I buy a house in the next few years, we are only looking at houses that are older. No new cookie cutters for us. 🙂

    Post # 51
    Member
    96 posts
    Worker bee
    • Wedding: June 2017

    wow nice houses! And what a great post! We bought a house that’s 350 years old. There are no foundations, the water pipes were lead, everything leaked and it was actually nearly falling down. After putting in steal beams to hold it up, damp proofing, re-wiring the whole place and re-plumbing, we are getting there after years and years… Id say we have at least another three years to go. But I wouldn’t have it any other way. I love it! We do nearly all the work ourselves, at weekends and in holidays (apart from the re-roofing and plastering!) The only downside is all my clothes are ruined and i nearly always have cement or brick dust in my hair haha.

    Post # 52
    Member
    2966 posts
    Sugar bee
    • Wedding: September 2012

    i would love it as long as i didn’t get a creepy vibe from it and it wasn’t falling apart. my aunt lives in a house that was built in the early 1900’s and it’s so cool. the only thing that i don’t love is that there are several (nine, i think) entrances to the house, which could be a little unnerving.

    old does not autmatically mean haunted. new houses can be creepy/haunted too. it’s not just about what happened in the house, but what happened on the land.

    Post # 54
    Member
    2091 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: September 2014

    It depends, are there ghosts?! I ain’t got no time for them… Also, is it a fixer upper? I rented a house that was older, and that piece of junk was all kinds of falling apart. It would have been dangerous to have a newborn crawling around on those beat-up floors with nails sticking out. It would likely be cheaper to knock it down and rebuild rather than gutting it and trying to fix the many issues that it had.

    I would like a house that I can move into right away. The first house needs quite a bit of work, hence the price I suppose… The second is to die for (hehe, creepy pun intended). The only creep factor is all of the wood paneling will make it pretty dark in the evenings. It is very beautfiul and a good price despite that. 

    Post # 55
    Member
    569 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: November 2013

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    pinkshoes:  Oh my gosh, totally drooling over both of the listings you posted!! I’m in MA too 🙂 now if only I was a millionaire…

    Post # 57
    Member
    507 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: May 2015 - Our church and then at The Garden Room for the reception

    I love old homes.   My FI’s family actually lives in one, and I’ve had to get used to one of the staircases with the teeny tiny steps (good grief, how small were feet back then?). What I find really cool is that a regiment of Civil War soldiers actually camped out in one of the fields on the property (I guess they probably stopped to water their horses because there is a stream there).  We’re trying to prove that the house may have been a stop along the Underground Railroad (the basement would have been perfect for a hiding place), but we haven’t yet found evidence to prove or disprove my theory.

    Post # 59
    Member
    507 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: May 2015 - Our church and then at The Garden Room for the reception

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    rel318:  That is extremely cool, the listing you posted. What a dream that would be, to live in a place that old. I wouldn’t mind, as long as it wasn’t falling apart and wasn’t haunted. If those walls could talk, what stories would they tell?

    Post # 60
    Member
    1516 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: City, State

    My home was built in the early 1880’s, making it 130+ years old.

    Honestly, I never really thought of it as “old” since all the houses in my neighborhood were built at the same time.

    With all the bad comes a lot of good.  We still have all the original windows (that open and close with a pulley and rope), the plaster is not easily fixed/replaced, and the home has yet to be fitted with AC.  But we do have gorgeous (and original) hardwood floors, fabulous leaded glass built-ins, 8″ base and crown moldings, and two clawfoot tubs that date back to the 1900’s.

    This home is definately a labor of love.

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