(Closed) Keep the dog or let it go?

posted 6 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
9824 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

@oracle:  Have you attempted training at all even? Or was sending her back your first plan of action?

It just seems like a lot of “what ifs” to be sending her back so soon.

Post # 5
Member
2866 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

You CAN get homeowner’s insurance with that breed. Insurance lady popping in here 🙂 However it can be difficult so you will have to really dig and shop around. However only you know what is best for you. I know people are going to jump on you in 2 seconds flat for considering giving away your dog, but you do what you have to do. 

Post # 6
Member
5547 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2011

Any dog can be aggresive, and while yes, some breeds are more likely to be aggresive, training and spay/nuetering can do wonders. If you are willing to put in the effort, I am sure that there are people who specialize in training for more aggresive breeds to avoid those things. 

Post # 7
Member
9824 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

Can I ask why you selected that particular breed to adopt? Not to say there is anything wrong with the rottweiler as a breed, but were you aware of the potential housing problems or possible aggression in doing your research? If she’s skittish, training and socialization can probably work most of that out. I’d give her MUCH more time to settle in, it won’t happen overnight. You adopted her so unless she has outright bitten or shown vicious tendencies, it’s going to be your job to train, socialize and overcome any issues she may have with being confronted with a new living situation. It can be done!

Post # 8
Member
7293 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2011

I’m sorry your going through this!

I have a feeling that your nervousness and anxiety will only worsen the problem and you will never fully be able to trust her/give her what she nees if you keep her. Is she from the pound or a rescue? Re-homing to a family/person who works with “dangerous” breeds ( those deemed by insurance as no bueno) . If she is pure Rotty, is their a local rotty rescue you could contact?

I also reccomend a muzzle on walks if your really think its that bad, for you assurance ( to help bring down the anxiety) and what not.

Personally I think she needs a lot of work and dedicaiton. Someone who won’t freak or give up on her , to help her reach phsycial and mental balance. If you could give that to her and work on it, that would be tremendous and life changing. If you can’t then it may be best to work to get her in a place where she can flourish.

Thinking of you and the pup!

Post # 8
Member
907 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

I think u should see how the training goes. My recommendation is to seek out a rescue organization and ask them to recommend trainers they have worked with. Also I Google searched tortweiler liability insurance and found a couple companies that offer it. Good luck with ure dog!

Post # 9
Member
491 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

I would try to put her in a good obedience school before you give up. Did you look into Rottweilers’ temperament before you got her? They are more aggressive breeds, but can also be trained to be very loving! There was a thread last week about aggressive dogs, you could look at it to get some good tips?

I’m not trying to be mean at all, but didn’t you think about all these possibilities before getting her? I know most places require you to answer a lot of questions and look into your home/apartment insurance policy before getting the dog to make sure this type of thing doesn’t happen. I say give it some time, try some good obedience schools, and if she’s still too much of a liability then you can think about your other options. Good luck!

Post # 10
Member
7293 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2011

Also more breeds than you think are in bad dog policies! Even the little guys. If your only qualm is being insured, you can find some company to do it!

Post # 11
Member
3773 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: December 1999

Sorry OP I can see this thread going up in flames very fast. There was a poster who’s dog bit her husband’s face and she got flamed for even thinking about giving the dog back.

ETA: I hope this isn’t the case because sometimes it is more responsible to admit that you can’t provide what a dog needs and give it a chance to find a family that can.

We have a dog that we had to dedicate a lot of time to retraining some pretty serious behavioral issues. It takes a lot of time and patience and sometimes quit a bit of money. But I ifrmly believe that you should give this dog a chance. you have a responsibilty to it to give it a home, and it is not discardable. Keep searching for an insurance policy and enroll in a training class ASAP. Exercise is also super important so make sure it is getting enough energy out.

Post # 12
Member
9824 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

I want to add as well, while I think you should put effort in rather than immediately sending the dog back, that in no way means you’re a bad person if the dog isn’t working in the family (dog isn’t happy, you guys aren’t happy). Just that it doesn’t really seem like the dog has done anything yet to warrant giving her up. I think if you’re willing to put the work in there’s no red flags going up in this post that indicate that the “right” home can’t be yours!

Post # 13
Member
7587 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2010

You need to do what makes you feel comfortable. If you have even the slightest worry, then give the dog back. Waiting any longer in my opinion can have a negative effect on the animal. 

Post # 14
Member
1183 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2012

I would keep looking for insurance….we have a pittie chow and we found the right insurance for us. We pay a little extra for it but it’s worth it!

I would also suggest getting a canine good citizen certification if you can. That helps with the rate and behavior problems. We used training and the anti anxiety med clomicalm on my beagle/lab who was snappish. 

Find a positive reinforcement based training center and work on teaching her appropriate stress coping techniques. Dont correct her growling!! My dogs all have stress cues they give when nervous and we taught people to recognize them (hackles up, whimpers, tail carriage, licking a lot, pawing).

Btw….I love Rotties!! They are incredible dogs, especially with training that builds their confidence! It really calms them down….more than many other breeds. It’s all about the owner handler bond with that breed!!

Post # 15
Member
907 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

Ooh also I recommend a gentle leader or halte they r a head leader. Dogs can still eat and drink with it on bit it hora around their mouth which helps settle them like their mothers do when they r pups. It also gives u more control of the dog which will make u less nervous and the dog will be less nervous. If u r nervous the dog will read ure energy and see what is different ie dog or new human and react to protect u. I know someone commented on another post that they used a collar like this and hurt thirty dogs neck but I’ve had my dog lunge before with it on and he is fine. Just make sure its on properly. I adopted a dog that had been mostly living in a crate for 5 months as a pup. And he was the same skidish with strangers and fearful/agressive with other dogs. We now walk right next to strangers with no problem. And most dogs with little reaction. Also adjust ure expectations, I can kbt take him to the dog park but I’m okay with that.

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