(Closed) Kosher Dinner

posted 8 years ago in Jewish
Post # 3
Member
2006 posts
Buzzing bee

General Rules:

No dairy or meat can be mixed at all. Don’t even plan on having a dairy desert if you are having a meat meal (food would mix in stomach).

No shellfish. Fish like salmon are perfectly okay.

No pork products, obviously :p

My family has a ton of crazy old Jewish cookbooks we use to cook out of. This site is recommended by Hillel (a well known Jewish organization run on many college campuses)

http://www.myjewishlearning.com/culture/2/Food.shtml

Post # 5
Member
2006 posts
Buzzing bee

PS. Technically you can’t cook a truly Kosher meal because your kitchen is not kosher (hasn’t been blessed by a rabbi). No worries, most Jewish kitchens aren’t though :p

Post # 7
Member
2006 posts
Buzzing bee

The REALLY strict Jews who keep Kosher will have two of everything: two sinks, two dishwashers, two fridges, two sets of all dishes.

Moderately kosher kitchens tend to just keep their dishes separate. Two sets of dishes. Meat dishes/silverware would be washed on one side of the sink and dairy dishes on the other side. No food from one category would ever touch the dish of the other category.

Lax kosher kitchens just follow the food rules and skip keeping the dishes/appliances separate. 

I honestly don’t know if a kosher kitchen would have two fridges, but my guess is it would if you were keeping strict kosher?

Post # 8
Member
745 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2010

most kosher kitchens don’t necessarily have two fridges..I have friends who are VERY orthodox but only have room for one fridge.  They just split the shelves up so meat and dairy are separated within the fridge.

Post # 9
Member
1079 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

How strict are you trying to be? Kosher dishes? You can kasher everything without a rabbi. You can boil silverware at least. Ceramic is harder. I would just cook an all vegetarian meal (plus fish if you want it). Be careful with cheese – you will have to get it without animal rennet, which is very common.

Post # 10
Member
1184 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

this recipe is great and pretty easy, every time i’ve made it someone asks for the recipe. does your friend keep strictly kosher? if so you may want to consider serving dinner on paper plates as i’m sure you’ve had meat and non-kosher food on your plates and the kashering process of plates involves a lot more than running them through the dishwasher. but if she eats out at mainstream restaurants then she probably doesn’t mind.

http://www.chabad.org/theJewishWoman/article_cdo/aid/888306/jewish/Parmesan-and-Sun-Dried-Tomato-Crusted-Tilapia.htm

Post # 12
Member
1079 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

You just need to buy cheese with vegetarian rennet – it will say on the label. Or cheese labeled kosher.

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-rennet.htm

I would boil your silverware and use paper plates.

You don’t have to worry about what you serve so long as it’s vegetarian. Also, look for the OU symbol on everything you buy for your meal.

Post # 14
Member
1184 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

there are no restrictions on when you need to cook the meal. you might have read that some orthodox jews don’t do their cooking on shabbat because they don’t use electricity, but as a non-jew you are not bound to follow that, even if you are preparing a kosher meal for a jewish person. in fact, jews often turn to what we refer to as “sabbath goys”–non-jews who aren’t bound by the rules of shabbat–to do tasks that require electricity.

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