(Closed) Landlord/Tenant Power Bill Responsibility Question

posted 6 years ago in Home
Post # 3
Member
3886 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I don’t think you have any grounds to ask for compensation unfortunately. As the tenant, it’s up to you to look after the property. Things do and will break. If you’d noticed and reported it but the landlord didn’t fix it, that would be another story. But the burden of ensuring problems are spot tend quickly is on you unfortunately.

Post # 4
Member
2463 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

I’m with fishbone…plus, our power bills always go up during the summer, I think the power company actually charges higher rates during the summer if I’m not mistaken…

Post # 5
Member
1856 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: March 2013

Yeah, unfortunately, it’s up to the tenant to notice these kinds of maintenance issues and report them to the landlord. If you had noticed and told him and he did nothing, you might have grounds to ask for compensation, but it’s on you guys to keep an eye on the property and tell him if there’s anything broken. He can’t be responsible for something he didn’t know about.

Post # 7
Member
1137 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

Does your landlord live on property of have a maintenance person full-time looking after the property? If not, it is 100% your responsibility to look after the property and report and issues to him to fix. You said he fixed it immediatly upon hearing of the problem, so he did his job.

My tenants had a running toilet in their house for 2+ months. I only found out about it because I pay the water bill directly and they reimburse me for it, and I saw their water bill was high so I asked them if there were any issues. They were still responsible for paying the full amount, as I would have no way of knowing there was a problem that needed fixing if I hadn’t seen the bill. If they would have told me when the problem first occurred, it would have saved them $200 in water bills!

Post # 8
Member
3886 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

Most power companies have a free service where they’ll come out and inspect your home for energy efficiency, so if you’d called them after that first high bill, it might have been spotted sooner.nit sounds like your company goes above and beyond in taking care of its tenants, which is great customer service but unfortunately not the norm in rentals.

Post # 10
Member
1137 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

@sweetdee522:  Yeah, I’ve had tenants tell me that the power bill was high and when I came over to investigate, they had the A/C set at 60 degrees! Basically, unless they tell me something is specifically wrong (i.e. the duct work is not connected), I usually just send them a form letter list of things they can do to lower their utility bills.

I still think you just have to chalk this one up to “lesson learned”. 

Post # 11
Member
3618 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

I don’t think you have any grounds to ask for compensation. The landlord didn’t know that there was that problem and he promptly fixed the situation once he was notified of it. He isn’t going around crawling under his rental proproties checking for these problems either.

Post # 12
Member
3772 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

I would see if you could get some money out of it. We had issues with a water pipe being broken. Fiance called it in multiple times because he knew his water bill couldn’t be THAT high. Landlord ended up fixing it and paying the difference between the high bills and our highest average bill. or something like that. 

Post # 13
Member
3886 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

I’ve got a friend who owns a small (8-units) apartment building and he does a monthly inspection of each apartment, spending about an hour per unit checking the plumbing, electric, insulation and so forth.  He does it because the utilities are included in the rent so if someone has a wonky window, it costs him money via increased utilities.  As a homeowner, we do a similar inspection every 2 months or so: crawl under the sinks looking for dampness, check the windows and doors for gaps, etc etc.  Perhaps you could arrange something with your landlord where he would give you a little discount in exchange for you making these inspections, or where he would send someone to do the inspections for you?  In the long run it will save both of you money, as it will help spot problems while they are still small.

Post # 15
Member
11752 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

It’s your responsibility as the tenant to notify the landlord of any problems. He is not responsible since he had no idea about it.  You can check your lease terms to see if anything was violated on his end and check state laws, but right off the bat it doesn’t sound like you have any grounds to ask for money from him. He repaired it promptly when notified. 

You could/should have notified him when the bill skyrocketed the first month – as it was a clue into something being wrong. 

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