(Closed) Landscaping at a rental house

posted 4 years ago in Home
Post # 2
Member
2591 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2017 - Valleybrook Country Club

I would assume maintaining weeds, cutting the lawn, and trimming any hesges/bushes as routine maintenence. I would definitely hire someone in your case to avoid and potential issues!

Post # 3
Member
5940 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2014

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acesandeights:  I rented a house like that. It really depends how much work you want to do and what you have. We mowed the lawn and trimmed the shrubs. We didn’t do anything extra: no edging, weed pulling, trimming grass along a fence. No adding seed or fertilizer to the lawn, no extra plantings etc etc. I guess we did the bare minimum.

Post # 4
Member
5082 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2014

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acesandeights:  We rented our last house and we were responsible for lawn maintenance. We mowed and edged/weedwacked the lawn, weeded the mulch planters, fertilized, trimmed hedges and low hanging branches. There was an HOA, so we tried to maintain their standards. Our landlord did some of the bigger stuff or stuff that required special tools that he had and we didn’t, like pressure washing walkways, trimming tall trees, adding new mulch, and laying down new sod in patchy areas. Basically, if the HOA complained about it, we addressed it if we were able and the landlord did the rest.

 

Honestly, if you are moving out, I’d do the bare minimum to still get your deposit back. Mow the lawn, trim the hedges. 

Post # 5
Member
922 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2017 - Vineyard on Long Island

you could probably ask your landlord….. in my lease, yard maintenance is defined as moving the lawn, watering plants in cases of sparse rain, and maintaining the garden (weeding, etc.) but we dont have hedges to trim and such. 

Post # 6
Member
2695 posts
Sugar bee

I’d say lawn and weeds. I rented a home to tenants for several years where that was part of the agreement but I didn’t expect them to do anything other than cutting the grass and pulling weeds. I maintained the bushes once a year and kept the lawn fertilized and aerated/seeded. The key was if it was an “annual” type chore, as the landlord, it was my responsibility. 

Cutting bushes required a trip to the dump to dispose of the debris. I wouldn’t expect a tenant to handle something of that nature. 

Post # 7
Member
1132 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2010

I own rental houses and my tenants are responsible for yard maintenance. I expect them to cut the grass, weed the beds, and trim the hedges. If it’s too much responsibility for them, I will give them phone numbers of some local landscaping companies to do the maintenance for them. If they leave the house overgrown and full of weeds, I would take the cost of a services to do that work out of their security deposit when they move out.

Post # 9
Member
5082 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: December 2014

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acesandeights:  I’d probably just let the landlord know about the poison ivy and see what they say, that seems like something that a landlord should be the one to take care of. I would say that dealing with a large tree is also a job for a landlord.

Post # 10
Member
774 posts
Busy bee

View original reply
acesandeights:  If you have been routinely mowing and are moving out in a month, it seems like you have done enough. I probably wouldn’t invest any more $ into this rental property at this point, except maybe cut the grass 2 or 3 more times before moving out.

We just had a tenant move out of one of our rentals where she was responsible for yard maintenance, and never did any of it. Not a thing. Grass (if you can call it that) was 3 ft. high in the front and back. We paid a service $120 for about 5 hours of work to make it presentable, and took that amount out of her security deposit. But we did not penalize her for the weeding along the fencing and things of that nature (we just went it and did that stuff ourselves after the lawn service took care of the worst of it). It really depends on how much of a stickler your landlord is. If you were my tenant and had been regularly mowing, that is good enough.

Post # 11
Member
1124 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

I would ask your landlord what they really expect of you.  Don’t mention things like the poison ivy, you’ll put ideas in their head of what they can charge you for.  I’ve been a landlord for almost 10 years and know the tricks. 

Post # 12
Member
1132 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: January 2010

Absolutely tell your landlord about the poison ivy. That is their responsibility to make sure the property is free of hazards. 

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