(Closed) Laser Drilled Diamonds

posted 6 years ago in Rings
Post # 2
Member
1949 posts
Buzzing bee

is this the same as clarity enhanced diamonds?

Post # 3
Member
107 posts
Blushing bee

I remember Robbins Diamonds trying to sell me one and told me until the last minute.

If you do try them, make sure you get that discount. Dont let them quote you a price that is similar to non drilled. 

Post # 4
Member
2366 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: March 2015

Don’t buy one. They are essentially worthless. buy a cz 

The fracture-filling of diamonds is a very controversial treatment within the industry — and increasingly among the public as well — due to its radical and impermanent nature. In fact, diamonds which are fracture-filled are being called “Clarity Enhanced Diamonds” which is designed to give you, the consumer, the illusion that this type of diamond is actually better than diamonds which are not clarity enhanced. This is a total sham!
The process involves filling open fractures in a diamond (e.g., large and multiple feathers) with a glass-like substance which will camouflage the visibility of these large feathers. This results in the diamond having an “apparent” clarity grade which is better than it would actually merit without the treatment. In fact, most diamonds which are suitable for the fracture filling process are so imperfect that they run the danger of breaking under stress due to the significant fractures present in the diamond.
Because the filling glass melts at such a low temperature, it easily “sweats” out of a diamond under the heat of a jeweler’s torch; thus routine jewelry repair can lead to a complete degradation of clarity or in some cases shattering, especially if the jeweler is not aware of the treatment. Similarly, a fracture-filled diamond placed in an ultrasonic cleaner may not survive intact.

The glass present in fracture-filled diamonds can usually be detected by a trained gemologist under the microscope: the most obvious signs are air bubbles and flow lines within the glass, which are features never seen in untreated diamond. More dramatic is the so-called “flash effect”, which refers to the bright flashes of color seen when a fracture-filled diamond is rotated; the color of these flashes ranges from an electric blue or purple to an orange or yellow, depending on lighting conditions. One last but important feature of fracture-filled diamonds is the color of the glass itself: it is often a yellowish to brownish, and along with being highly visible in transmitted light, it can significantly impact the overall color of the diamond. Indeed, it is not unusual for a diamond to fall an entire color grade after fracture-filling. For this reason fracture-filling is normally only applied to stones whose size is large enough to justify the treatment: however, stones as small as 0.02 carats have been fracture-filled. This is an important factor in the very low price of some diamond jewelry products too, for example, tennis bracelets.

It is notable that most major gemological laboratories, including that of the influential GIA Diamond Trading Lab, refuse to issue certificates for fracture-filled diamonds. However, there are other Labs that do certify these diamonds so it is important to know what Lab is issuing the certificate on a particular diamond.

Fracture-filled diamonds with a specific “apparent” clarity grade sell at a very significant discount compared to what I like to describe as a “real” diamond of the same clarity grade will sell at. For a buyer who is uninformed, it may appear to be a bargain. It is not!

  • This reply was modified 6 years, 1 month ago by jily.
Post # 5
Member
5560 posts
Bee Keeper

This is just another term for CE diamonds yes?  I would suggest getting an actual photo of the stone first before you commit. They are a bargain for sure, but I’ve purchased 2+ carat CE diamonds before and you can [without any loop] very visibly see the crack lines on multiple sides.  I was horrified, and the stone went right back.  And it was an ebay seller no less, [this was 12+ years ago as well] thankfully he exchanged it because he knew the jig was up.  He presented something in photos that was not the stone I received.

Post # 6
Member
206 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

View original reply
jily:  I’m having a hard time believing that you wrote that word for word, if you’re going to copy and paste, cite your source, don’t present a google result as your own words.

Especially since the poster asked about laser drilling and you posted about fracture filling, which isn’t the same thing.

 

OP, BestBrilliance.com carries clarity enhanced with photos and videos of the stone you’re buying, if that’s your thing, laser drilling is definitely the preferable of the two enhancement types.

Post # 7
Member
10041 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2013

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kpfromcanada:  I’ve heard that goodoldgold.com can source these for you. Also look into Yehuda, they were the first to sell clarity enhanced diamonds and may also have laser drilled. GIA will certify laser drilled diamonds, so if you must get one I’d make sure it’s GIA certified.

Post # 8
Member
443 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2016 - Long Island, NY

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Soloudinhere15:  She copy/pasted straight from here: 

 

http://www.afishman.com/diamond-clarity.html

 

What’s odd, is that she skipped right over the writing about Laser Drilled Diamonds (which was clearly the question) and gave the information below! *lol*

If this were my classroom, she’d be getting a referral to the assistant principal! 

Post # 9
Member
2366 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: March 2015

View original reply
Soloudinhere15:  It’s obviously cut and pasted, either way I can’t imagine why anything other than the accuracy of the statement matters. This isn’t an original work of literature…lol As to the section on laser drilledmy phone didn’t load the whole page, that’s why I hate cut and paste. Either way, while laser drilled is superior tofracture filled and the GIA may certify, getting insurance it more complicated if not impossible with high quality carriers and the resale value at least in NYC is zero…. 

Additionally, clarity enhanced jewellery is rife with scams and outright garbage very few reputable jewellers will deal in these stones. There is one bee on here that appears to have a lovely stone, but I’ve seen several IRL that don’t hold up,well and their owners are stuck with something that makes them unhappy.

View original reply
jellybellie:  

  • This reply was modified 6 years, 1 month ago by jily.
Post # 13
Member
206 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

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jily:  Lol is right…you can’t even copy and paste the right information when you’re posting other people’s thoughts as your own?

At least put quotations around things that aren’t your own words. 

When you copy verbatim from somebody else, the source does matter, as posting a fact in someone else’s words, is still posting someone else’s words as your own. In your case, though, you posted a vendor’s information about CE stones that is obviously tainted with that vendor’s own opinion, and that doesn’t make it a fact.

Many reputable dealers will sell a clarity enhanced stone to a client who requests it. If you go out there looking for one, you won’t get scammed buying one, because that’s exactly what you were looking for. There are very reputable makers/dealers of clarity enhanced stones. The internet has made it much easier to know exactly what you’re buying.

I know someone who has a lovely clarity enhanced stone from Yehuda and it’s been going strong for at least 10 years now. Buying junk is buying junk, whether you bought that H-I/SI3 cluster ring from Kay’s or you bought a fracture filled hunk of spit on ebay. That doesn’t mean there’s no reputable sources for a better quality version of the same thing.

Post # 14
Member
2366 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: March 2015

View original reply
Soloudinhere15:  Im going to assume you meant to be funny not rude. As I said in my post the page didn’t load which would have included the referenced jeweler. Either way, this is a website forum not a scientific journal so perhaps you should consider taking a deep breath….

With that in mind lets stop hijacking the OPs thread. She has made her mind up regarding what she chooses to purchase. 

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