Leave stressful state job for less money/worst benefits?

posted 6 months ago in Career
Post # 2
Member
1027 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2015

I would look for what it would take to obtain another state job. I know you said your position is unique, but you must have transferrable skills.

Studies show that women tend to think they need to be a perfect match for a job description, whereas men apply confidently for whatever. Look for what you can get with the skills you have, and then also look at what extra experience/training/etc. would be helpful for getting the jobs you want. In the long run you shouldn’t have to choose between a good working environment and good benefits.

Post # 3
Member
2652 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2018

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blueberrywave :  I’m currently looking to transfer to a state job (I have an interview Friday!).  My husband and I both have master’s degrees and good jobs, but still, if you have “regular” health insurance, it’s terrible.  We have a family max out-of-pocket of $15,800 and have hit it this year. We also hit it last year. That number will likely go up next year (it went up $1,200 between 2018 and 2019).  We also have to pay several hundred dollars per person per month for part of our premiums.

All this to say, if there’s any way you can hold out until you can get into a different state job, if might be worth it for you.  We have spent about $50,000 in the past two years on medical expenses.  We don’t have any crazy health issues, but we had a child, he has a medical condition that requires testing and some intervention, and then I had appendicitis.  Those costs are just barbaric and unsustainable.  

Post # 4
Member
377 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 2025 - City, State

Definitely submit applications and accept interviews.  You can’t properly compare your options if you don’t know what they are.

Post # 5
Member
7523 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2013

View original reply
blueberrywave :  There are jobs in the private sector that also have excellent insurance benefits. Can you hold out until you find one of those? Or at least a job with decent benefits and not a large deductible like PP posted about?

Post # 6
Member
9397 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

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MrsBeck :  this was my thought too. 

What field are you in, OP? Most private sector jobs in fields I’m familiar with offer higher pay and better benefits than state equivalents. 🤷‍♀️

Post # 7
Member
8750 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

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Grid :  my husband is a state employee and he’s had a bunch of friends go private. The salary is a lot better but the benefits always are worse – it ends up being a wash. My private employer offers the same exact health plan as we have through my husband’s state job except the premium is more than double and the deductible is exactly double. We always say we have the perfect combo – my private salary and his state benefits. 

Post # 8
Member
9397 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

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LilliV :  interesting that’s def not the case for us! Dh’s in tech and his benefits are incredible. Of course it’s all so industry and employer-specific.

Post # 9
Member
247 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2017

Not a state job and my company offers excellent benefits – I have my husband and I on a $0 deductible plan with an annual max out of pocket of $1650. It’s free for me and I pay about $50/month to have him on my plan. I also am paid well above what I would make at my job if I worked for the state.

It never hurts to look. Just because you look, apply, or even interview for a job doesn’t mean you have to take it if they offer it to you. Start with looking for a job you like, then if you get an interview you can ask about pay and benefits.

Post # 10
Member
15001 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

I would take a look around and see what other offers look like.  I find having less money stressful also so I’d have to have hard numbers to consider if it was really worth it.  I can’t say without comparision if I would take ‘lower pay’.  Like would I drop from 100k to 50k?  That’d be a hard no for me no matter how stressful the job I think, but 100k to 80k, probably if we can easily afford it. And definitely look at the entire compensation package, not just look at them individually. 

Post # 11
Member
2652 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: July 2018

I’m not saying every job has my shitty benefits. I live in the least populated state in the country and we work together at a small company, so those are two factors working against us in terms of shitty insurance. But I’m just saying, beware that some places have realllllly bad insurance even if it’s a great job. 

Post # 12
Member
2389 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: March 2017

I’d definitely look around to see what your options are. What does your husband think? I once worked at a state job and left that job when we moved to another state. My coworkers thought I was nuts, but I have no regrets. 

I get pretty decent benefits in the private sector. 

Post # 13
Member
391 posts
Helper bee

I have a state job and have moved from one agency to another a couple of times.  There are always exams to take for different titled positions.  Once you’re on a list for a specific title, you’ll start getting canvass letters from any agency in your state that has openings for that title.  You should already know that, though.  Take as many tests as you’re eligible for/interested in and get on those lists!  You can also do lateral transfers (same title, different agency/location).  Call your local Civil Service office for information and postings.

Post # 14
Member
119 posts
Blushing bee

I also work for the state… the benefits are ok, what I’m really after is the pension. It can be stressful and management is strict. I have to work most weekends and holidays, can only bid for vacation once a year. All other days off are not approved. This bugs me. My days off are Tuesday/Wednesday.

I could deal with it, but my biggest problem is the place where I work is in a high cost of living area and if I want to move closer in a house it would cost at least 150-200K more then the value of our house. I commute 50 miles to work one way. If I could just afford to move closer I would deal with the drawbacks of my workplace. 

It’s all up to your priorities. You could probably find another workplace with decent benefits. Maybe a county job? 

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