(Closed) Lessons learned from a young professional failing hard at negotiating

posted 4 years ago in Career
Post # 2
Member
2168 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception/The Gallery

Sorry you had a bad experience, but don’t give up!

Also, I totally second the “getting a second job in your field is harder than the first out of school”. I’m in a field that can be public or private also and it’s so frustrating. Now that I want more than entry-level salary, it’s been very hard to move on and up. Had a few interviews but no luck. Gah. 

 

Post # 3
Member
426 posts
Helper bee

I asked for $7k once thinking they might meet me halfway and the company pulled the offer. They thought my expectations were too high.

 

I am happy it worked out that way and I’m glad I negoatiated for what I’m worth.   I have since moved on and make almost double what I was starting at so screw that first place!

Post # 4
Member
5044 posts
Bee Keeper

Sorry that happened.  Industry research and company research is really key.  I’ve seen a few “governement job” negotiations fall flat because people don’t understand that government agencies have set budgets and are beholden to the public.  Additionally, many are union whose wages are set through collective bargaining and the payscale is what it is without negotiation.  The most that can be done is an occasional bump up a payscale step for experience, but that usually doesn’t happen at entry level, only with internal promotional opportunities.  So a few fresh out of college people have come in for entry level positions and tried to negotiate what the equivalent private sector is paying and have ended up pretty embarrassed and disappointed.  So, don’t worry – you’re not the only one.

Post # 5
Member
337 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: November 2016

When in a government job it’s a bit different. As you said, they usually have set salaries. However, in many industries, asking for 2000 is nothing. You should negotiate.  Not just women; anyone. Fight for your worth. If the offer is fair, leave it. If you feel you are worth 2000 more, ask. To most reputable companies, 2000 is a drop in the bucket. 20k is a different story. 

Sorry that your experience turned out the way it did. I’m sure you’ll be able to make it work. We are always capable of more than we think 🙂

Post # 6
Member
6241 posts
Bee Keeper

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akshali2000 :  so they said no. Maybe they have fixed ‘bands’ within the company. But I can’t see how asking would have done you any harm. Did they mention targets/future opportunities for a rise?

Post # 7
Member
3436 posts
Sugar bee

 So you asked, they said no. I wouldn’t consider that “failing hard.” Give yourself a break. 

Post # 8
Member
986 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 1984

View original reply
SLOBee :  +1000!!

 

View original reply
akshali2000 :  Sorry negotiating didn’t work out this time but it never hurts to try! Great advice for most peole in most industries.

Post # 9
Member
3436 posts
Sugar bee

Also, this situation has nothing to do with being a millenial:) It happens to everyone.

Post # 10
Member
9065 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

When I was a hiring manager I had people ask and I said no sometimes. I didn’t think less of them for trying though! Don’t be so hard on yourself. 

Correction: the one woman who expected $70k for an entry level position we listed in the mid-$40k I thought less of – she clearly didn’t read the posting well and wasted my time! But that’s not what you did lol

Post # 11
Member
429 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2017

Don’t feel like an idiot. You didn’t ask for something unreasonable. For example if you asked for 52K instead of 50K it’s only a 4% difference. If you asked for 102K vs. 100K that is 2%. This isn’t a generational or gender mistake. You just received a poor response. I hope things still go your way, but if they don’t, please realize your professional worth is not tied up in one organization and one job. You have many more places and things to do in your career. 

Post # 12
Member
13889 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

I don’t think you failed.  At least you tried.  Sometimes it just doesn’t work.

FWIW, I’ve spent my entire career in government and government contracting.  There usually is room for negotiation.  In my most recent job, they asked my prior salary to ensure that the switch was worth it for me financially. 

Post # 13
Member
297 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2015

You didn’t fail. I tried and tried and did not recieve the requested salary but a guy after me hired only 2 weeks got 10K higher bc of surplus. He left after 7 months and I continue to have same salary.

And none of this women don’t negotiate bs google recent studies and data women DO negotiate DO articulate and they get denied – for all candidates asking for higher pay, women get their request denied more in a statistically significant way. 

I learned to value my skills and that the places I work for that value my skills will pay – moved jobs and got promoted after trial period, got a bonus, and salary increase with recognition award. 

I have no advice but I’m angry as hell still at how the market treats us, value your skills and that will transfer to your employer, and remeber these experiences when it’s our turn to hire as millenials (bc boomers clearly don’t give a s and live in mad men mentality). 

Post # 14
Member
11385 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2015

You should be proud of being so prepared, doing your homework, and treating yourself like you’re worth driving a hard bargain. 

Yes, you learned that it doesn’t always work- but you should also learn that it didn’t hurt to try:-) 

Post # 15
Member
5423 posts
Bee Keeper

View original reply
akshali2000 :  Great advice! However it’s great to also not lowball yourself. I did that and I’m still paying for it.

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