(Closed) Letterpress question

posted 10 years ago in Paper
Post # 4
Member
115 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

Artisan Press, Red Oak Press and Painted Tongue Studios have clearer discussions on this, but here’s what I gleaned in my letterpress research:

The historical hallmark of a very good letterpress printer is one that will "kiss" the paper with the image, *without* leaving the debossed impression that you see in so many invitations. Things have changed over the last decade or so, with more people looking for a textured image, but I think that to many printers the flat printing is still a symbol of excellent work.  Maybe this shop doesn’t have as much experience with wedding invitations, etc. so they did not understand that you wanted a more contemporary look. 

It sounds like it’s a small company– I think you explained your reservations about the resulting STD well to us, maybe they’ll be able to work with you on it.  Regardless, at least now they know what you expect for your invites!

Post # 5
Member
91 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: September 2018

There are two techniques to letterpress, kissing and punching.  My company name is actually Kiss & Punch.  In any event, kissing the design is the traditional form of letterpress where the ink just "kisses" the paper. This is how they printed books back in the day.  You should be able to gloss your hand over the paper without feeling any impression. 

Today, and much against traditional letterpress designers, the "punch" is exactly how it sounds….the impression pressed into the paper.  You can feel the texture of the text and design.

Hope that helps. Did they send you a sample beforehand? 

 

Post # 8
Member
91 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: September 2018

Habibi,

No problem!  You may want to look into Crane Lettra paper for your invitations.  That is what many modern letterpress companies use to get a good impression and ink distribution.

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