(Closed) life after teaching- how to switch careers?

posted 5 years ago in Career
Post # 2
Member
560 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

Not sure about the USA but in Canada your past employers are not allowed to give a bad reference. 

Post # 3
Member
47389 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

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justagirlfirst:  That’s not true. There is no law that says they can’t give a bad reference.

Most employers however, don’t want to get involved in any legal disputes with former employees.  They limit their responses to confirming the length of employment, position held and stating whether or not they would rehire the person.

Post # 4
Member
47389 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

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giovanni19:  First start by making a list of your employment skills and transferable skills. Every job comes with a skill set that will be of value in another job.

Employment skills are those that are job specific. List them and give examples.

Transferable skills can be used everywhere. Things like:

communication skills

teamwork skills

listening skills

computer skills

time management skills

problem solving skills

learning skills

creative skills

leadership skills

List them and give examples of how you have used those skills.

Job search using those skills as your search term.

Post # 7
Member
212 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2015 - Bellagio, Las Vegas

You can definitely file a complaint for that.

 

I’m also following this thread because I want to do the opposite. I’m a nurse that wants to leave nursing for teaching. I am heavily thinking about it. 

Post # 9
Member
47389 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

 

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justagirlfirst:  There’s nothing in that link that says employers can’t provide an honest poor reference. Rather they need to be able to justify their information if they provide a poor reference. An employee is not going to win a suit against an employer for limiting their ability to find another job, if the information the employer provides is true.

That is why, as I said, most employers limit themselves to providing the basics when asked for a reference.

Post # 11
Member
47389 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

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justagirlfirst:  I didn’t realize you had posted twice. Initially I responded to your last post which did not link to the specific article. I have since responded to the first post.

I deal with labour law in my union position so I’m pretty sure my interpretation is correct.

Post # 12
Member
560 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

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julies1949:  No problem, I believe there is a lot of grey area, and you can get into trouble if someone wanted to push the envolope. My husband does the hiring and firing in the company he works at. I know he has been instructed never to give a bad reference (written or orel) His company laywer advised this.

I guess the days of referances are over. Maybe it’s not a bad thing, now employers need to hire on purely education, skill, and your ability to sell yourself 🙂

Post # 13
Member
47389 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

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justagirlfirst:  The trouble with that is that there actually are bad employees and some of them are very skilled at selling themselves to a new employer.

No employer is going to lose a lawsuit if they respond to a reference request with a simple statement. “John___ was employed  as an outside sales agent here from ___ to ___ . We would not rehire this employee.” That tells a new employer everything they need to know.

Post # 14
Member
299 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2016

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giovanni19:  get on Linked In!!

 

the absolute best resource for job seekers!

 

best of luck to you! xo

Post # 15
Member
2239 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2015

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giovanni19:  I taught for a couple of years at another poorly-run school and had to get out. I worked at a non-profit that worked with young people (and I also had some admin experience) and loved it. I’m actually back in grad school right now (about to finish) for teaching – but in a different content area than I was before, but I really enjoyed my time in the non-profit sector. You still feel like you’re doing good, and there are TONS of education/youth-related non-profits out there.

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