Living with pets in the country

posted 1 year ago in Pets
Post # 2
Member
1151 posts
Bumble bee

Can you look into making your backyard coyote proof? Not sure if that’s a thing but it might be an option.

Post # 3
Member
2109 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2018

I would think if you put up an effective fence, like a privacy fence, a coyote wouldn’t come into it. They are fairly wary of people andit would be very unusual for one to purposely try to get into your fenced yard (I’m a wildlife biologist). Also be aware of raccoons at night – they like to forage in people’s yards if you have dumpsters or other food-smelly things and could be dangerous for little dogs. 

Post # 5
Member
276 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2016

I grew up in “the country” and the #1 threat to our pets and livestock was stray dogs and neighbors’ free roaming dogs. There’s no leash laws in a lot of rural areas and oftentimes people would dump their unwanted dogs in our area. These dogs actually formed packs sometimes and would massacre 20+ chickens in one shot. It only takes 20 minutes for something terrible like that to happen! One of these dogs killed a neighbors cat. If a dog can kill a cat it can easily kill a baby!

There are a few things you can do for protection. First, a tall privacy fence for you little dogs is great. If you ever want to adopt another dog get a big territorial dog. Certain dogs are bred to work farms, protect, patrol, etc. A big dog can keep lots of weird critters out of your yard and protect you and your other pets. One reason we never had to worry about our little dog was because she was always with her bodyguard friend!

If you’re WAY out in the middle of nowhere you should consider a shotgun… rabid animals and venemous snakes are deadly. 

For now get a good fence and poke your head out the door or keep an eye on your dogs from the window every so often. If a coyote finds its way into your fence I’m sure you’ll hear your dogs barking!

Post # 6
Member
1614 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2018

Not sure bee, I mean the fact that you already see wildlife means your pets would be subject to that danger. Also, a fence might keep out coyotes, who have been known to climb fences but it will have to be pretty tall to keep out bobcats and cougars….yes cougars and they can jump pretty darn high.  I would suggest no trees near the fencing if you can swing it.  My opinion is that you need to keep your pets inside and don’t let them out if they can’t be monitored.

 

Post # 8
Member
147 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2017

I am a wildlife biologist and my thoughts are the biggest concern with your little dogs are owls at night.  I have heard of owls preying on small dogs and cats and know people it has happened to.  Bigger hawks can do the same with very small dogs.  Though yours might be pushing the limit for a hawk, but definitely not a large owl.  Don’t let the out alone at night.  A good 5-6 foot fence should generally be OK for coyotes.  There honestly isn’t much you can do about lions, not sure if they are a concern in your area.  As far as raccoons, skunks, etc. I wouldn’t be concerned there, other than getting sprayed which just happens when you live in the country!  Be prepared some day to open the door and have your dog dash past you into the house reeking to holy hell!  Good times….

Post # 9
Member
147 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2017

And I think your dogs are fine outside in the day alone, just not after dark.

Post # 10
Member
1614 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2018

violet90 :   Nope, that’s not true.  There’s already stories with video of bobcats and and cougars jumping into yards and taking/attacking small pets in broad daylight.

Post # 11
Member
147 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2017

sablescorpion22 :  I understand that.  But there isn’t much she can do other than keep her pets inside all the time.  You can completely wìldlife proof a yard!  Bobcats are pretty shy and likely won’t pose a problem.  Lions are typically active early in the morning and at dusk and night.  We don’t even know if she lives in an area with lions.  I do, but I have three large dogs and don’t worry about them.   There is only so much one can do when you live in a rural area, it is part of the territory.  

Post # 12
Member
749 posts
Busy bee

I wouldn’t let a small dog stay outside by herself/himself even in the country side. Too many dangers, especially in areas with lots of coyote. I know there are coyote vests you can invest in, not sure how well they work but it’s worth a shot. My Future Mother-In-Law has a couple larger outside dogs though and they do just fine. 

Post # 14
Member
147 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2017

I have lived in the country all my life, with both small and large dogs that stay outside during the day and the worst experience I have ever had was skunk sprays.  Not to say one shouldn’t be cautious.  The best deterrent is a larger doggie companion!

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