(Closed) Looking for ladies who work/have worked in Childcare

posted 5 years ago in Career
Post # 3
Member
6826 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

Take this with a grain of salt… since it has been over 10 years since I worked in a center.

Did you go to school before working in childcare? Which program/degree?

I did go to school yes. I have a degree in Family Life and Child Development. Minor in Early Childhood

How much do you currently make an hour? What did you start at?

We are talking 1997-2000 here. I believe start pay was below 10.00 an hour and end pay was just barely above 10.00 an hour

Do you think it is necessary for me to attend college before opening a home daycare?

I would yes take some classes. 

Do you still enjoy your career?

At the time I did enjoy but got burnt out fast. Daycare workers/providers tend to wear out pretty fast.

Post # 4
Member
8461 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2013

@siempresoulmates:  I used to work in early childhood education (ages 3-5).  I started around $8/hr, I had a 2 year degree (ECE emphasis school-age child), and I couldn’t make enough to pay for rent.  Granted this was a while ago (2005 ish), but I was living in Orange County, CA, my apartment was like $1000/mo (living with someone mind you) and somehow I’m supposed to live on $8/hr.  Do you need school to run a daycare?  I would say probably.  Most states have regulations on this, so you’ll have to check with your local government.  For me, I had to stop working because of the parents, not the children.  The stress of the job was definitely not worth the pay.  My mother actually owns a tutoring business that I also used to work at, which was equally infuriating.  I’m not saying this to you to discourage you, but just be prepared. 

Post # 5
Member
983 posts
Busy bee

If an at home daycare is really what you want, think about the future when you decide to start your own family, and putting that quality/quanity time in with your own child while taking care of 5+ other children at the same time.  Just something to think about if you are going to do it on your own.  I know in some counties (here in the states) you are only limited to a # of children you can have under your own care, and that is including your own children.

Post # 6
Member
2622 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

Not sure the difference between family and group family day care, but if fell into the group there are some very specific guidelines and certifications you need.

 

https://www.revisor.mn.gov/rules/?id=9502.0355

 

Subp. 3.

 

Group family day care.

 

A group family day care applicant shall meet all the requirements listed in subparts 1 and 2 for family day care. A group family day care applicant shall also meet the qualifications in item A, B, or C.

A.

 

A minimum of one years’ substantial compliance with parts 9502.0315 to 9502.0445 as a licensed family day care provider; or

B.

 

A minimum of six months’ substantial compliance with parts 9502.0315 to 9502.0445 as a licensed family day care provider; and

(1)

 

completion of an accredited competency based family day care training and assessment program offered by an accredited institute; or

(2)

 

thirty hours of child care, health, and nutrition training as specified in part 9502.0385, and a minimum of 520 hours of experience as an assistant teacher, student teacher, or intern in an elementary school or licensed child care center, or as an assistant adult caregiver in a licensed group family day care home; or

(3)

 

thirty hours of child development or early childhood education training, as specified in part 9502.0385, and a minimum of 520 hours of experience as a licensed practical or registered nurse; or

C.

 

Certification or licensure indicating:

(1)

 

completion of a two year child development or early childhood education associate or certificate program at an accredited college or university;

(2)

 

completion of a nine month child development assistant program at an accredited technical college;

(3)

 

a current Level I or Level II prekindergarten license from the Department of Education;

(4)

 

a kindergarten through sixth grade teaching degree from an accredited university or college that includes a minimum of 30 hours of child development training; or

(5)

 

documentation of a minimum of six months satisfactory experience as a full-time teacher at a state licensed group d

Post # 7
Member
2515 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

my mom had an in home montessori preschool/daycare from the time i was 2 up until i was 19. i grew up around 2-5 years olds and worked for her during high school and the first year of college. i got my BA in liberal studies with a minor in early childhood education. i worked for one of the daycare centers at stanford university also. i worked for my mom back in the 1990’s and she paid me well. i worked at Stanford in the early 2000’s and got paid $13/hr (i hadn’t graduated yet).so to answer one of your questions:

Do you think it is necessary for me to attend college before opening a home daycare? yes i think you should go to school for this or at least take a bunch of classes. it’s important to understand child development and the different learning theories (such as montessori, etc). also, the more ECE credits you have, the more money you will make. that’s why i got paid so well at stanford. even though i hadn’t graduated yet, i had a ton of ECE credits and they took my past work into consideration.

just saw a post from jmaze. she’s right that state regulations limit you to a certain # of kids. for my mom in the state of CA, it was a ratio of 6 kids per teacher. she started the daycare because my dad walked out on us and she didn’t want my sister and i to be in daycare all day or to be latch key kids. she was able to stay home with us and have a career at the same time. she was supposed to count us as part of the 12 kids she was licensed for (she had a 2nd teacher) but she never did and it was only a problem once. it really depended on who came to do the inspection. you will definitely need to look into the regulations for your state.
 

 

Post # 9
Member
2515 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

@siempresoulmates:  you won’t make much working for a center but you can make a decent living with an in home daycare. if that’s something you really want to do, i would say go for it. look into classes at a community college first since they’re cheaper. if you can work part time or even just a few hours a week in a childcare center or an in home daycare, that would also really help. when you open your own, parents are going to want to know what your experience is. i’m not sure what daycare costs are in MN but in CA, it’s crazy expensive. i have friends who are paying $1600/month for one child. MN is probably not as expensive but even if you take in 4 kids and charge $600-800/month, that’s $2400-3200/month. you can raise your rates as you gain more experience.

Post # 10
Member
6826 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

@siempresoulmates:  I work for one of the largest healthcare providers in the US. So completely out of the childcare scene. 

 

Post # 11
Member
337 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

@siempresoulmates:  

 

hi,im a in home daycare provider for 10 years now in delaware

its really not that hard to become an in home daycare provider at all.

call your childcare license office in your state and ask them to send you a packet to get started to open up your daycare.

in home is so different from a center,a center has much more rules and regulations to follow and much more classes/schooling to do.however things are changing and you will need certain schooling to do this for in home so you should get started now before they make changes.they may have already in some states,not sure.

you will have to do a few hours of classes(we have to do 15 hours) to get started but its very easy and i have fun enjoying a few hours out with the ladies.

in home is great money,depending where you live.

the town i live in i can charge $120 a week for an infant.

the next town over from me can charge $150 and up a a week for an infant.

im only level one still(because i choose to)so will you when you get started,

i can have 6 full time children and 3 school agers.

i love having a daycare but one poster is right,im starting to get burnt out,but i think that has more to do with my age and years caring for kids(at least 22 years) 

give it a try,you will love it

 

 

 

Did you go to school before working in childcare? Which program/degree?

 
no
 
 

How much do you currently make an hour? What did you start at?

 
it all depends on age of children,i can if i want easliy make  $600 to $750 a week

 

Do you think it is necessary for me to attend college before opening a home daycare?

 
no,but you have to take classes(15?)hours they are usually held at daycare centers,schools ect where ever they can have to the class.you sign up for the ones you need/want to take.
im a last minute person,i usually hurry and do all my hours 2 months before my renewal date for my license.
last year i did them all on line,im going to do that again,however i have to renew my cpr/firstaid,so i will have to personally go to those 

 

 

 

Post # 12
Member
914 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

I worked as a coteacher at al very nice preschool while in college and only made $10 an hour. And that was more than others made. I think it’s good to have an early childhood education degree, though it’s not required. You have to take your 45 hours of classes to be certified, though I don’t remember the specifics. It’s just a shame that child care workers are paid so poorly for how hard the job is!

Post # 13
Member
7 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: March 2013

I work at a preschool (gov funded) and WITH a four year degree in Education I still make only a bit above minimum. Sadly, this is very common for the area I live in. I do think classes are necessary mainly because it gives credibility to you as a teacher/caretaker that parents expect when paying. I echo the pp when they said parents are the part that burn you out. Be prepared!

Post # 14
Member
449 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

I agree with the other bees. Classes and/or some college degree sounds like a good idea for what you’re wanting. I currently work as a part-time nanny (though it will not be my ultimate career choice) and I was lucky enough to have had heaps of expierence growing up. I’m the oldest of four children, I taught my brother how to read when he was 4 and I was 12, its just something I obtained. I don’t do anything fancy, but I will say I’m good at what I do. ๐Ÿ™‚

 Still, before started my own childcare business I would definilty take classes or get a degree. Plus, childcare is a big deal. Parents are far more likely to trust you with their children if you can prove that you will do a good job

Post # 15
Member
764 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: January 2014

I technically have not started working in childcare (I am still in school). I do think it is important for any child care provider to have more schooling on Early childhood education, because not everything should be based on common sense, there should be actual knowledge based decisions. 

Did you go to school before working in childcare? Which program/degree?

Yes a BS in Interdisplinary Studies (Pre – K – 6th grade).

How much do you currently make an hour? What did you start at?

I am unsure of the hourly rate. I do know I will be starting off making $47,000 a year.

Do you think it is necessary for me to attend college before opening a home daycare?

Most deff. yes.

Do you still enjoy your career?

The student teaching and observations that I have been doing is very enjoyable. I do know that once I am teaching the state testing will probably be the one thing that I will not like.

Post # 16
Member
2515 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

@siempresoulmates:  oh and also, you need to learn child and infant CPR/first aid (if you’re not already certified).

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