(Closed) Looking for the perfect wedding invitation

posted 4 years ago in Guests
Post # 16
Member
216 posts
Helper bee

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maryshum :  I’m sorry I don’t know where they got it made, but I know shutterfly can do it.  And yea, I think sending out something useful cuts down on the number of people tossing it in the trash down the line.  I know for sure we’ll be keeping ours for a long time because it’s a real big, sturdy magnet and probably the strongest one on my fridge right now so we use it all the time.  I will say, they didn’t use a picture of themselves, it just says “Let’s I Do This Thing” which I think is adorable and I kind of like the subliminal message it sends to my SO everytime he looks at the fridge lol

Post # 17
Member
728 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2016

We made our magnet save the dates on Vistaprint. Not sure if I’ve ever seen a magnet INVITE though.

Post # 18
Member
490 posts
Helper bee

Please get them from a local shop and look at them versus buying online. You want to feel the paper and see the type. Don’t risk getting anything tacky from an online place.  The invitation sets the tone for the wedding. Please mention the Parents’ names. I can’t stand “Along with their parents.. Johnny and Suzy invite you blah blah blah..” British spelling is still used on a formal invite. Engraved are expensive but still the classiest. Don’t even  think about using computer labels on the envelopes! Hope this helps.

Post # 25
Member
181 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: February 2016

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merrymargaret :  I get that Emily Post is your Bible but using British spelling on an invitation sent by an American couple to American family and friends always reads as new money to me. Oh, the *favour* of a reply is requested? There is nothing sadder than wannabe WASPs with big Anglo hardons.

Post # 26
Member
193 posts
Blushing bee

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spontoise :  Eh, every invitation company I spoke with told me that I should use “honour/honor” of your presence for a ceremony in a religious venue.  And that if you use “honour” on the invite, it should probs match “favour” on the reply card.  Obviously, you don’t have to do that, but I’m a fancy pants so we used honour on our invites.  This is the biggest party I’ll ever throw, so why not throw on some fun flourishes?

Here what’s I don’t get — we seem to live in a world that glamorizes the casual even when that narrative is completely fictional.  For instance, I’ve had several girlfriends champion their chill, laidback rustic weddings and conveniently forget to mention that they cost $65K+.  Meanwhile, my semi-formal event with the same headcount is $40K.  But my wedding and “honour” would get the “oh that’s so pretentious eyerolls”? Huh?

Post # 27
Member
2497 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2018

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maryshum :  Like a link to a video? I don’t get the point. What would the video be?

Post # 28
Member
181 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: February 2016

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aliceandrews :  It’s not about casual or formal. I agree with you that it’s silly to glamorize the casual and it’s especially weird when casual and formal are thrown together in a single event, ie. barn wedding but the groom is wearing a tux.

I just don’t understand why brides equate British spelling with formality. The notion that “wedding colours” are fancier than “wedding colors” is nonsensical, tacky, and – ironically – very American. It’s trying too hard, in the same way that a British bride with a California bohemian wedding aesthetic would be trying too hard if she asked her guests for the “favor of a reply.”

Post # 29
Member
193 posts
Blushing bee

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spontoise :  I give a pass for the wedding invitation context, but agreed, don’t see the need to use superfluous spellings in any other context.

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