(Closed) Low FSH,Low LH, Low Estradiol…What now?

posted 4 years ago in TTC
Post # 17
Member
4998 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: September 2013

NewYearsEve:  Everything I’ve heard/read is that low BMI is a problem with HA. Mine was 18.5 when I was first diagnosed, and now it’s 19.5 but I still don’t have a period. A lot of women say they had to get up to 21-22 to get their period back. I’m not going to be able to do that – it was already hard for me to get it to where it is now, and my weight has been stable for about 6 months. I cut back on exercise (I still exercise, but cut back) and added a lot of fat to my diet, but it still hasn’t “cured” me. This is very frustrating!!

Post # 19
Member
302 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

NewYearsEve:  Oh my, your experience with Clomid sounds awful (and totally scares me, since I take my first Clomid dose tomorrow!  eek!)  I sure hope an RE is willing to work under the “irregular cycles/anovulation” label for you for a while.  I mean, certainly that *IS* your immediate problem, right?

I don’t know how old you are, but if you’re young I might give the thyroid meds a couple months to start getting things back on track.  If you’re older (like me), I probably wouldn’t have the patience to wait a couple months and would try to get into an RE sooner.  I’m so sorry you’re having to struggle with this AND deal with insurance on top of it. 🙁

Post # 20
Member
1564 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

NewYearsEve:  How long have you been on your thyroid meds? Your thyroid hormones can vastly affect your reproductive hormones including estrogen. http://natural-fertility-info.com/hypothyroidism-reproductive-health.html

 I have Graves’ Disease and did not have a period for 6 months when I wasn’t treating it. It took about a year on meds to get back to normal levels and my cycles were incredibly unpredictable at that time. I’m sure you don’t want to hear to give it more time but your thyroid needs to regulate itself to get your fertility back on track. 

Post # 21
Member
293 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

NewYearsEve:  Sorry you are experiencing this issue, but I feel you should be able to start seeing a RE while still having insurance cover the costs. When I first started experiencing infertility issues I did not have insurance coverage for infertility or assisted reproductive procedures/treatments. I went off of BPC after 16 years and started having irregular periods and I wasn’t ovulating properly each month. I decided to see my OBGYN after 6 months of irregular cycles to figure out what was going on.

I first saw my OBGYN who was able to run the basic lab tests for Estradiol, Progesterone, LH, FSH, TSH, Testosterone, and etc. Just like you my OBGYN was able to read the results, but really offered no advice other than prescribing Clomid for a few months and recommending seeing a reproductive endocrinologist. I decided I should see a reproductive endocrinologist after working for 4 months with my OBGYN and making no further progress. When I first visited my RE I was under the diagnosis of “Irregular Menstrual Cycles”, so my insurance could still be billed. I was able to have consultations, monitored bloodwork, and ultrasound appointments covered by insurance. I was so happy to finally see a RE because she diagnosed me fairly quickly with PCOS and placed me on medicated cycles (Clomid, Femara, Ovidrel) with various blood tests and ultrasound monitoring to monitor my cycles and help me ovulate.

During this time insurance covered all testing and procedures while I was classified as “626.4- Irregular Menstrual Cycle”, “Cycle Monitoring”, and “256.4- PCOS”, which many women are coded as until they need to move onto more advanced fertility treatments using ART (IUI/IVF/etc.). Many women can have success using medicated and monitored infertility treatments, so I would advise pursuing this route. If nothing else at least schedule an initial consult with a RE and also talk to their billing dept. about insurance coverage. 

Post # 22
Member
1298 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

NewYearsEve:  I go to a regular acupuncturist (not one specifically for fertility) who treats my inblanaved hormones but also my anxiety. Both have improved since going. Even if I wasn’t TTC low progesterone and whacky hormones are not something I wouldn’t have wanted to live with. 

Since startinf acupuncture weird acne that had popped up due to hormone issues have cleared leaving me with glowing skin and I’m overall way calmer. I also ovulated yesterday  for the first time in god knows how long. 

 

Maybe you can explain the benefits of acupuncture to your husband as overall health and not just for TTc? 

Post # 24
Member
302 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2014

NewYearsEve: I’m allergic to everything under the sun.  Even the tiny BCP I was taking made me feel sick and get anxious and moody.  DH is prepared for the worst, bless him.  We both just see it as a means to an end.

Do you temp/chart at all?  When I went to my OB/GYN, I took the charts with me so she could see the irregular cycles and lack of ovulation.  I mentioned that we’d been TTC, but definitely tried to keep the focus on the fact that I wasn’t ovulating or have periods regularly.  That really precludes you from getting pregnant, so like I said, the issue isn’t that you are having problems conceiving.  The issue is that you don’t ovulate and therefore can’t even try.  It was actually my doc’s idea to write it up as “irregular cycles” (and PCOS) rather than infertility since she wanted everything to be covered for me.  Additionally, I think that it won’t be considered infertility until the following is done:

1. CD3 and CD21 bloodwork for me to confirm all my levels are good.

2. Sperm Analysis for Darling Husband

3. HSG to be sure fallopian tubes are clear

4. And due to my PCOS, a few cycles with Clomid (and potentially other medications as needed – Metformin, Progesterone supplementation, Estrogen supplementation, etc.)

This was a LOT more than I thought would be covered through the normal OB/GYN.  Only after all of the above testing and Clomid failure will we be referred for infertility.  Obviously, not all insurance plans or doctors are the same.  I think I lucked out getting an OB/GYN whose fave part of the job is the baby catching.  She also thanked me for coming in so soon – I went after 6 months TTC – and she said that with our ages (33/35), it’s better find the problem and treat it ASAP rather than continuing to keep trying without success.  You still have time though, so don’t panic!  Better to just focus on getting your hormone balance back, starting with thyroid.

Post # 25
Member
293 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

NewYearsEve:  That is so frustrating that your OBGYN would classify you under “Infertility” so quickly. Many OBGYNS know that once they place the insurance label of Infertile you no longer can receive routine treatments covered by insurance. I’m not sure how the RE labs and ultrasounds would work now.

I would still contact your local RE clinic and schedule an initial consult. The consult should be billed to your insurance company as a “physician office visit” and you just owe the copay of a specialist visit (i.e. $20 or $40). At least this has been my experience since all of my consults and follow-up visits with my RE were labeled as office visits using two different insurance companies (switched jobs). The actual testing (blood work and ultrasounds) may no longer be covered since your insurance now has you labeled under “Infertility”. But during your consult you could always speak to their billing dept. to understand your options. Good luck and keep us updated. Inferitility is such a hard road to travel!

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