(Closed) Macaroons vs. Macarons

posted 5 years ago in Etiquette
Post # 3
Member
2555 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

are you sure you’re in fact serving macarons and not macaroons?

if you’re positive, just ask her to mail the menu to you before printing. say “could you send me the menu so I can check it before it goes to print? i don’t mean to be a pain in the ass, but i’m anal about that stuff!”

Post # 4
Member
9056 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2010

Do you think she actually thinks you’re meaning that you’re serving macaroons?  Like, the coconut haystack cookie?  She may thinks she’s spelling it just fine because she’s referring to that?

Post # 6
Member
6216 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2013 - The Liberty House

^ that was exactly what I was going to say. I always specify “french maracon” 

Post # 7
Member
2390 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

They’re 2 entirely different things. I suspect if you’re having a fancy tea you’re probably serving macarons.

Post # 8
Member
6216 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2013 - The Liberty House

@oneofthesethings:  lol you never know. Some people are really clueless.

Post # 9
Member
9056 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2010

Then I might just contact her and say that you’re going for a vaguely Parisian feel, and would like it spelled the “French” way on the menu. 

Post # 10
Member
2869 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I would 100% very specifically tell her.  By email so it’s in writing and make sure you get confirmation.  Yeah I’m a perfectionist bordering on OCD, but I’d also check with her once the menu is done to verify that it’s correct. I don’t think it’s rude at all to ask/let her know that.

Post # 11
Member
2555 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: April 2013

@SapphireSun:  I would definitely not say that. macaroon is not correct in english if you’re talking about macarons

Post # 12
Member
9056 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2010

@bebero: but if you’re wanting to spare somebody’s feelings and not make them feel stupid like the OP said… it’s not a bad soluation.

And when I googled Macaroons the Martha Stewart website came up with a bunch of recipes the included both French macarons and the macaroons that would come to mind if spelled that way, so maybe there’s more overlap between the versions than we know??  The overview says it’s “Whatever its origin, the combination of ingredients in a macaroon produces a cookie with a crackly outer layer and a chewy center”

Post # 13
Member
46403 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

@vanessa7:  If you have been corresponding by email, just tell her, also by email, that you would like  it spelled “macarons” on the menu. No explanation needed.

Post # 14
Member
1699 posts
Bumble bee

“Macaroon” is the British spelling; “Macaron” is the French spelling. In the States, the most common style of Macaroon is the coconut macaroon — vastly the most common, to the degree that any soft coconut cookie may inaccurately be called a macaroon; and a non-coconut version is considered “something completely different” to the degree that some American recipe authors think they need to use the French spelling in order to restore the original meaning of the word.

If you want your friend to use the French spelling, you will have to tell her. But those who are familiar with the broader more original meaning of the word will think that you are either mispelling it, or are trying to imply you have exotic parisian influences.

 

Post # 15
Member
412 posts
Helper bee

Just go buy a box of macarons and tell her the story in your intro, but make it sound like it happened today. So then you can make it like you just fortuitously discovered it before the party, but that you didn’t know any better either. If you thought the same as her, it’s more of a joint discovery, and won’t come across as a “you should have know better” thing.

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