(Closed) Making invites from scratch

posted 7 years ago in Paper
Post # 3
Member
2493 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

My advice:

1– read up and research to see what styles, ideas and information you want to include

2– learn how to use a good software program (like photoshop) where you can design everything you need to print. Learning from scratch is not simple, and if you have never used a software program before you might want to see if you can find somewhere to create templates online or a program you can buy that will help.

3– have someone edit. Seriously an often overlooked step!

4– either use a great printer to print your items or take the paper to a professional printer

Post # 5
Member
2493 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

@nshorty: My sister is a graphic designer and is doing all mine. My only warning is that I thought DIY would be cheaper and it is about the same price as buying them from a card maker. It kinda sucks. If you want to keep your costs low, I’d suggest buying a kit from Michael’s using a coupon and then adding touches that are more “you” like rhinestones or ribbon.

Post # 6
Member
5657 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: February 2012

Have you designed them yet on your computer? If not, I suggest you start there!

Are you printing them using a normal at-home printer? I suggest doing some test prints on scrap paper before printing the real deal, to verify that your design is perfect. (I printed my invitations using a back and white laser printer on fancy paper and they turned out really nice!)

After you’re happy with your prints, mock up one whole invitation, from start to finish and make sure you’re happy with it. Modify some of your methods, if necessary!  

I’m a graphic designer and I found designing the invitations to be the easiest part… all the cutting/gluing and such was new territory for me, so I had to practice a few times before I got it right!

Post # 8
Member
79 posts
Worker bee

Make sure you choose your envelopes before you finalize and print your cards. Envelopes can be one of the highest costs and if you end up with a non-standard or hard to find size of invitation the price goes up. I’d suggest working backwards finding a good price on envelopes or picking the ones you like and then choosing the size of the invite based on that (I work in a stationery shop and that is what we usually recommend that people do when they want to design their own invites)

Post # 9
Member
37 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: June 2012

@nshorty: I second the advice of test printing “prototypes” during the design process.  There can be a big difference between how it looks on the screen vs. printed out, and you want to have a few chances to experiment with printer settings.  The cutting, gluing, and assembly techniques also definitely take a bit of experimenting to get right.  Last, you will probably get better/different ideas for design improvements with the physical product in hand vs. working digitally only.

I’m in the middle of this right now, and I’m on my third or fourth prototype of the suite!  Good luck!

Post # 11
Member
79 posts
Worker bee

@nshorty: No worries, obviously you don’t have to buy them first but it’s good to settle on a size, also envelopes are usually 1/8 of an inch larger than what needs to go in them 🙂

The topic ‘Making invites from scratch’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors