(Closed) Male vs. Female dogs? Need help deciding on whether or not to adopt this female.

posted 7 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
13099 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

My family has had a mix of male and female dogs of a variety of breeds over the years and I’ve seen little difference in the willingness/desire to cuddle, the socialness, and the ability to rile up for a game of fetch or a wrestle on the floor between male and female dogs at all (at least not any of the ones we’ve owned).  To be honest, if I was forced to pick the sex that was most social/playful/cuddling, I’d say our female dogs would slightly beat out the males.

Darling Husband and I own a female lab mix right now who LOVES to play fetch and tug on her rope toys, have us chase her around the apartment, and to roll around on the floor.  She is super social and feels the need to meet every dog and human we ever come accross on our walks. Yet at the end of the day she loves to cuddle up in bed with me and sleep by my side all night.

I really wouldn’t worry about the fact that this dog is a female instead of a male.  Just judge her personality and temperment when you meet her, completely irrelevent of her sex.

Post # 4
Member
776 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

I have a female dog and she will do all the things you describe you want: cuddle, be nice and sociable,  get “riled up”, playing tug or fetch.  I think the personality depends more on the specific dog then their gender…just like humans.

Post # 5
Member
6892 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: March 2012

I have both a male and female dog and they BOTH love to cuddle and hug and play. My male dog likes to cuddle more at night and my female dog likes to cuddle more in the morning, but I think that’s just a personality thing.

Post # 6
Member
801 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2008

It’s more about the dog’s personality than the gender that will determine many of those traits you are looking for.  I personally prefer female dogs because of hygiene reasons mainly but if you asked for cats I would prefer males since they can be less standoffish (though again, individual personalities).  I would say don’t make up your mind based on gender but on that individual dog’s personality.  Have fun at your meet and greet!

Post # 8
Member
1392 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2010 - Heron Hill Winery

we have two girls and they are just fine 🙂  Growing up we have had our mix or both and I haven’t really noticed too many differences in temperment.  I know that males if unneutered can become agressive, but my guess is that if yours is a rescue it will be neutered.  Our girls have all been cuddly, playful and fairly sociable.  I think more of temperment has to do with breed and overall environment.  If the dog is raised well and socialized at the right age, it should be fine. 

Post # 9
Member
5496 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: April 2010

I, too, prefer males dogs, but only because I’ve had two dogs and both are males. I wouldn’t hesitate to get a female someday. 🙂 I really think it just depends on the dog. I’ve met great male and female dogs and not-so-nice male and female dogs. I don’t think the gender matters so much, at least to me.

Post # 10
Member
494 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

In regards to the male/female hygiene thing, I personally have seen some male dogs that actually pee on themselves!!  Maybe that’s what she meant?

I’ve had both male and female dogs and currently have a female.  She’s great and I prefer female dogs for the reason I mentioned above, but I’m not opposed to males.  I definitely agree that temperment and personality are really dog-specific, not gender necessarily.

Post # 11
Member
5148 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

There really isn’t much difference between male and female dogs for pets. Both genders you can get riled-up and play tug or fetch with.

On average, males are slightly more cuddly and females are slightly more moody/standoffish (they don’t call them bitches for nothing!) But this is a loose coorelation, there are plenty of cuddly females and plenty of moody/standoffish males.

If you get a male, make sure you are very diligent and on top of it if he lifts his leg in the house. Even if he’s neutered, don’t assume he won’t mark, many neutered dogs mark too.

Post # 12
Member
1135 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2009

@RenoRose: What female problems do you mean?  As long as they’re spayed (you are planning to spay, right?) female dogs don’t really have “female” problems.  We’ve always had female dogs, and they were wonderful.  My husband had male dogs most of his life and they were equally wonderful.  A dog that is trained well and loved a lot is going to be a great addition to a home, regardless of sex.

Post # 13
Member
13099 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

@mrsmdphd: I’ll second your comment that none of the female dogs my family has ever owned have had any “female problems” so I too am not sure what the OP might be referring to.

Post # 15
Member
7771 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

I have had both, and I prefer females.  I do think they have differences, but both can be fantastic.  You can have a connection with either- and I actually felt more connected to my female.  I have had problems with males peeing in the house.  As far as getting excited and having fun and cuddling, male or females will do that!

Post # 16
Member
116 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

We’ve had male dogs and right now we have a female and I would agree with previous posts…same lovableness factor!

One of the older male dogs we rescued had a very bad “hygiene problem” in that he would mark on furniture and basically anything that was left on the ground (and he was fixed!). Females aren’t  known to do this…so that may be a difference in “hygiene”.  

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