(Closed) Maternity leave in small business

posted 4 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 2
Member
899 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 2011

anna4041:  Is this your first child?  Personally, I would not have been ready at all to return to work 3 weeks post partum.  My baby was up every 2-3 hours at night and was feeding every 2-3 hours around the clock.  I was basically sleep walking and struggling to just feed myself and the baby and change the baby’s 10 diapers (lots of blowouts a day).  I honestly think I had been to the store like, once at that point.  Who will be watching the baby when you go to work?

 

How many employees does this company have?  And is the policy you are writing going to apply to future pregnant coworkers?  I would write the most liberal policy you can, whether or not you personally take advantage of it–and I would also try to train someone to take your place (or suggest hiring a temp worker) so that you can take more time off.

Post # 3
Member
336 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

anna4041:  I work for a small company (there are 9 of us) and my boss adheres to FMLA even though he doesn’t have to.  Honestly FMLA is the minimum I think there should be.  I don’t want to take 12 weeks unpaid because this is my second child and I would like to make at least the same amount of money that it costs to keep my older son in daycare so his schedule isn’t too disprupted, so I’m not planning to take the full 12 weeks, but I definitely plan to use the 12 weeks to make a really flexible schedule, working from home a bit and bringing the baby with me a bit.

Post # 4
Member
9816 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2013

One of my friends was in your situation.  I believe they gave her 4 weeks off completely and after that she “worked from home” for another 6-8 weeks before going back to work in the office.  By work from home, I don’t really mean she worked all day.  They just said you can “work from home” meaning do certain things that need to get done but otherwise we will pay you as if you were fulltime working form home.  So she did a few things and some conference calls, stuff like that but didn’t put in 40 hours or anything.  Her mother was also there the whole time and helped her out so I’m sure that made it more feasible.

Post # 5
Member
3697 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I would ask them to match FMLA, and then ask if they want to consider offering any paid leave to help with some of it.  Do they offer short term disability?  

My employer just created a policy for me.  🙂  They went as far as offering a reduced working schedule for 10 YEARS.  The first year, up to 3.5 hours (so, half days), the other 9 years, up to 2 hours reduced a day.  Pay obviously matched to new hours, but same hourly rate, benefits, and position.  I wish they’d let me go 3 days/week or work from home, but that’s what they were comfortable with.  Just grateful I have the chance to spend more of my son’s first year with him.  

Offering a set amount of flexibility/working from home would be great if they do that.  Maybe something like up to 5 days/week for 16 weeks, up to 3 days/week for 6 months if business allows.

Post # 6
Member
676 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2016

anna4041:  Even though FMLA does not apply, can you just use those “rules” as your policy? 3 weeks doesn’t seem like enough time to me…although I don’t have any children. I would say use the 6 to 8 weeks under FMLA (or maybe 4 to 6) and then part time or at home basis for a few weeks after that.

Post # 7
Member
5154 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: June 2014

anna4041:  3 weeks will definitely not work. What if you have a c-section? There’s no way you’re going back in 3 weeks. I would ask them to follow FMLA and ask if they can provide any type of paid leave during that time.

Post # 9
Member
1576 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I think your medical recovery time is 6 weeks for a vaginal delivery and 8 weeks for a C-section. I would at least take that much if you can’t justify taking 12 weeks. At least give yourself time to get healthy.

Post # 11
Member
1893 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

I was the only employee at the business. Plus my 2 bosses. Fmla did not apply to me either. Plus I was JUST hired when I found out I was preggo. i took 16 weeks off, unpaid. I definitely would not have been ready to return after 3 Weeks! I believe by law they have to give 6 weeks off.

Post # 13
Member
9544 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2013

anna4041:  I think FMLA (12 weeks with a guaranteed job) is a good benchmark to go by. I think a minimum of 6 weeks for a vaginal delivery and 8 weeks for a c-section is what is medically recommended, so that would be the bare minmum that I think should go into a policy. 3 weeks seems really early to go back. Especially if you’re hoping to breastfeed. And I would set up the policy for a worst case scenario rather than best base. My good friend’s baby had colic and there’s no way in hell she could have brought that baby to work because she cried for hours on end. 

Post # 14
Member
954 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2014 - Savannah, GA

I honestly think taking only 3 weeks off is crazy, especially if you are creating the policy for those mothers who will follow you.  You are setting a precedence and you taking only 3 weeks off will probably make it difficult for future moms to get the necessary time off.  If you are planning on breastfeeding, it will be very difficult to get a good supply if you are gone a lot of the day even if you intend to pump.  The few months following birth are both difficult and precious.  I encourage you to take a sufficient amount of time to adjust to your new life.  

Post # 15
Member
3697 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

anna4041:  I will also add that I had a c-section and pretty quick recovery, but at 3 weeks going in to work would have been REALLY taxing.  I wasn’t even caring for our son, since he was in NICU, but I was definitely still healing, had trouble walking and standing up, and was just so, so tired.  

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