(Closed) Medicated shampoo?

posted 8 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
3041 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

It could be she’s allergic to her food. You’ll have to meet with your vet. If you’ve already done that, they should recommend something like shots, etc. Do you know what she’s allergic too?

Post # 4
Member
5106 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: September 2011

We had our bulldog allergy tested because he started doing the same thing once he hit about 3yrs old. (Their breed is notorious for bad skin/allergies). Turns out he’s allergic to dust mites. Yay us. It would have to be something we can NEVER fully get rid of no matter how much we clean.

So we have to get him the allergy shots at the vet. Although they are quite expensive they work. And we use an oatmeal shampoo on him when bathing and he seems to do pretty well with it.

Post # 5
Member
1398 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

I had an issue with one of my cats scratching himself like that-my other cat had no problem at all. I got this stuff from Petco called Pro-Pet Skin and Coat Care formula which is an oil supplement you put in their food. The top three ingredients are Soybean Oil, Cod Liver Oil, and Wheat Germ Oil. I just mixed it in the food, and within a few days I noticed the scratching was stopping. You might try adding a little bit of oil to the dog food-not a lot, just a teaspoon or so, and see if that helps.

Post # 8
Member
5106 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: September 2011

What breed is she?

Post # 8
Member
5106 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: September 2011
Post # 10
Member
5106 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: September 2011

Do you know if either of those breeds are prone to allergies or skin issues? Maybe that could shed some kind of light?

Post # 12
Member
3526 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

Is your doggie a Pitbull? If so, Pitbulls are def prone to skin allergies.

Our pup -a Pitbull Mix- is basically allergic to the world. Seriously! haha. We had the allergy test done on her and she is most allergic to dust mite and basically grass among dozens of other things.

Something we tried that in our opinion didn’t really help her but might help yours

  • Putting her food in the freezer. because of the dried food there are dust mites on it and putting it in the freezer will kill them
  • Changing your sheets weekly. Dust mites are often found in the bed.
  • Vacuum A LOT.
  • Change out filters to your heating unit frequently.
  • Fish Oil Pills moisturize her skin & coat and will help with dryness
  • We purchased a humidifier because in the winter with the heat on it is extremely dry in our house.
  • Benadryl (2 at a time) are safe for dogs

Lastly, I have to ask how old is your dog? When we first noticed the extreme itching in our pup to the point where she was creating bald spots, we took her to the vet. Turns out she had Demodectic Mange which is a form of hereditary mange carried from the mother. This HAS to be treated. Basically there are little mites on her biting her which is why she is itching thus also exasperating the bald spots. If not treated her skin will get really red, it will spread. Images of bad cases
Where are these bald spots? Are they near the eyes? Is he or she itching/flapping her ears a lot?

I tell you about this because my dog is a Pit Bill mix as well and this condition is prevalent in Pit Bulls.

Please take your dog to the vet if you do not see improvement.

By The Way, per our vet recommendation we use a shampoo with Oatmeal & Aloe Vera.

Post # 13
Member
3011 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

Sounds like a flea allergy.  My cat went through that until I put her on Frontline.

Post # 14
Member
1052 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2014 - Cedar Lake Cellars

Basically, from that information, all you can say is that your dog is reacting to some allergen, any allergen.  It could be an air-bourne, contact, or food allergy,  And, unfortunately, unless something recently changed (her food, a major cleaner, bedding), it can be very hard to determine what is causing the problem. 

Changing a bunch of things at once won’t necessarily identify what the problem originally was.  It may make her feel better (which is all that matters), but it won’t tell you what the major factor was.  For example, if you change her food, her flea medication and put her on benadryl, then you don’t know what actually helped.  It could be benadryl treating a dust allergy but now you’re paying for a more expensive food too.  That’s why these allergies are so frustrating for veterinarians. 

I would recommend changing things one at a time rather than all at once so you can tell what makes a difference.  Giving her a bath to wash off contact allergens is okay.  And, benadryl is safe is dogs but hasn’t been proven to work as a super effective antihistamine like it does in humans.  Rather, it mostly just sedates them (as it sometimes does to humans too) so they stop itching.  And, no drug is side-effect free. 

Allergies can develop over a lifetime, so don’t rule out things that she’s always had contact to like her food.  And, you should definitely try the flea medication as well as one of the changes – all dogs should be on proper flea and heartworm preventative. 

There’s no easy answer usually, which really stinks.  But, once you find the allergen, it can make a world of difference in your dog’s life! 

Post # 15
Member
2142 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

 

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