Mexican-Punjab

posted 8 months ago in East Asian
Post # 2
Member
960 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2015

is your  fiancé Indian? It reads you are Mexican cultura are you mixed? Sorry to ask but I wanted a little background to the story.

wedding can be very expensive I personally have never been to an iNdian wedding but it seems to have a lot of process and tradition to uphold and I have heard it can take a few days. I went to a Mexican catholic wedding and with all the wedding traditions that take place there was hardly time for the guests to dance and have fun without being shooed off the dance floor to watch the bride and groom, Enter have the first dance, dance w parents, dance for the money dance, cut the cake. Throw the garter throw the bouquet. 

i can only imagine adding another culture and their traditions in one day. Maybe pick and choose what interest you in both weddings and have a timeline of events because in reality time is what your up against 

Post # 3
Member
1208 posts
Bumble bee

I don’t know much about Indian culture, but I once attended a family member’s wedding where our side of the family are big, loud, Italian Catholics, and her side is from Sri Lanka. The bride and groom incorporated both cultures right down to traditional clothing, food, alcohol, decor, and music. 

Most fun. Wedding. Ever. 

Post # 6
Member
779 posts
Busy bee

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ifyouseekemi :  your fiancé is Punjabi not Punjab. Punjab is a state in India, this Punjabi meaning someone who hails from there 

Post # 9
Member
505 posts
Busy bee

So this will really depend on what religion they are and how traditional they are. Are they Punjabi Sikh, Punjabi Hindu, or Punjabi Muslim? Almost everything will depend on that – for example, Sikh weddings generally only happen in a Gurudwara (that I’ve seen), whereas there can be more leeway with Hindu and Muslim weddings.

As for cost, it depends on how many people and where you live/where the wedding will be held, and for how many days, and what all gets included in the cost. Most large north indian weddings (including punjabi ones) in the US have around 300-400 people and cost anywhere $50K – $150K, depending on on what costs are included in that. Do both of you have large families? Does your church require you to get married in that church or for your fiance / partner to be baptized?

Also, I think you may be using the wrong keyword tag – Punjabi Indian weddings would technically be South Asian, not East Asian, just fyi (East Asian would be Chinese, Korean, Japanese, etc.) 🙂

Post # 10
Member
779 posts
Busy bee

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ifyouseekemi :  most Interracial marriages I have been to they ended up doing two ceremonies one for the Indian side and one for the church etc and then one big reception with both types of music, food, and clothes. 

Post # 12
Member
1293 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: December 2019

Despite my husband’s family being Hindu and mine being nothing—we still had two weddings back to back and celebrated for three straight days. It was… exhausting.

That said—I ended up liking that we did two separate weddings because there was no choosing on which traditions to honor over another. I don’t know your families, but for us being ‘fair’ was very quickly the end the dream of meshing the two cultures together. Our parents wanted to spend the money to separate weddings, so we just let them do it.

My advice is to set expectations early with your families and be firm that if they want you to honor anything they need to speak up. We sat both sets of our parents down and asked them what they wanted, but we still had to change our potential plans about four times because no one wanted to be upfront.

Post # 13
Member
1455 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2019

We did a Hindu wedding and a Western wedding on two separate days with a mehendi day in between (I’m South Indian and my husband is British).

My sister will be getting married in 2021. She is South Asian and her fiance is Mexican Catholic. They will be doing two different ceremonies on the same day (Hindu in the morning, some sort of Christian ceremony in the afternoon, reception in the evening).

I’ve been to both scenarios – spread out over several days or jammed into one day. Either way it is going to be exhausting but also tons of fun! South Indian weddings are different than Punjabi weddings, but Indian weddings on a whole are sooooo much fun! They aren’t as formal as Western style weddings – guests are encouraged to mingle and celebrate while the ceremony is going on. Figure out what is most important to you and your SO and go from there.

Post # 14
Member
505 posts
Busy bee

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ifyouseekemi :  Yup, and Punjabi / North Indian ones can get even bigger lol. good luck! We opted for 2 separate days, two separate weddings altogether (Friday and Saturday, with Saturday being a joint reception). Do ask if there is a requirement to get married in a Gurudwara, as that basically changes a lot of things. Also ask if there is a certain time of day in which the ceremony needs to take place for an auspicious time (not sure if this is the case for Sikh weddings, but Punjabi HIndu weddings are usually late night, like 11 pm or later, after the reception).

Post # 15
Member
505 posts
Busy bee

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blushingbee2019 :  Side note, my husband is South Indian as well! We did two separate days and our South Indian wedding was MUCH more traditional, religious, and in-depth than any North Indian wedding I’ve ever been to. It was also much longer and was held on a weekday morning at a temple, followed by lunch, rather than in the usual Saturday late-afternoon-ceremony-cocktail hour-evening reception timeline I’ve seen for other Indian weddings in the US. I’m not sure if ‘fun’ would really be the word to describe ours (other than the Sangeet event, since our South Indian wedding was very religious and ‘proper’ and also very DIY – like no planner or anything), but it was certainly colorful, vibrant, and traditional :).

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