(Closed) Mid-twenties life crisis!

posted 5 years ago in College
Post # 17
Member
4477 posts
Honey bee

Accounting is one of the hardest areas of study after engineering. Sounds like you have been weeded out, which is exactly what accounting programs are designed to do. The normal course of action is to stick your tail between your legs and switch majors.

However, you already have a degree. So, it’s time to start actually being an adult and get a job, any job. Screw counseling and just start applying to every entry level and menial job under the sun. Having dallied about since graduating, you don’t have the luxury of picking a career. You need to take any job that will have you.

The best thing your parents could do for you is give you a deadline to move out or start paying them rent.

  • This reply was modified 4 years, 6 months ago by  zl27.
Post # 18
Member
839 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

Well things dont always shake out like we picture as teens. It sounds to me like you arent cut out to be an accountant. You cant make it through school then thats that. No shame in it, I couldnt do it either. Time to just start working and figure out a new plan. It sounds like you and your whole support network are just coddling you to avoid actual work. Just get a job and start working. Id start with admin stuff if I were you.

Post # 19
Member
2233 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: February 2016

We’re based in the UK so it will be slightly different but the principles should be the same. My husband works in accountancy, he did a science degree and gained employment in an entry level position. The pay was crap. I’m not sure how we survived in all honesty, especially with my equally crap wage. He has done his accreditation theough work. For the last 3 years he has been working towards chartership. That’s 3 years in addition to his accreditation. Whilst your graduate programme might lead to accreditation (I have no idea if it does), it would more than likely not lead to chartership. Are you willing to study more to gain your chartership, especially if you’re struggling now?

If your graduate degree doesn’t lead to accredition, are you willing to put in the hours of studying in addition to working full time? If you’re mental wellbeing can’t cope with a graduate programme, can it cope with possible accreditation and chartership? You can’t get halfway through chartership and decide it’s not for you, well not without damaging employment prospects. Are you sure accountancy is right for you?

It’s OK to want to work in a field or have a specific job but sometimes that doesn’t work out for us. I wanted to be a consultant and took a job in the utility field using the technology I wanted to consult in. I started a graduate degree part time. It was hard, I wanted to quit, I wanted to stop spending so much money. I wanted a decent nights sleep. I wanted a social life, to see friends or just generally lounge around on a Saturday if I wanted. I’d like to add that whilst I was completing my graduate degree, my husband was working towards his chartership. It was hard on our relationship because our studying timetables conflicted. During my masters I got a new job in the environmental field, again using the same technology that I was doing my masters in, and I discovered that I preferred working within the environmental factors and that the technology I originally wanted to be a consultant with was a huge added skill in my employment prospects but not something I wanted to work with. It doesn’t mean my graduate degree is wasted because I still did it, I have proven that I can apply myself. Sometimes your career can take a detour and that’s OK and sometimes you are happier not in a field but using that skill.

If you are going to drop out of your degree, I would seriously look at if accountancy is right for you. If not, or if you’re undecided you could try to get an administrative job in an accountancy or other big corporate company. You might realise corporate life isn’t for you (it isn’t for everyone) and then start looking at where you can fit. Sometimes you have an idea that you’ll like it in a place and then don’t (my current situation).

Post # 20
Member
15203 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

You say you’re your mid 20’s so I’m gonna guess 23-26 years old?  If you’re even on the low side of that, 23… grade 12 (I’m also going to venture a guess here, was at 18 years old) was about 5 years ago.  Are you sure you’re not romanticizing the idea of accounting based on some distant memory of a class you were good at? 

Post # 21
Hostess
10358 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: March 2014 - Chicago, IL

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Jacqui90:  Ask your career counselor… ?

Post # 23
Member
1263 posts
Bumble bee

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FutureDrAtkins:  this 100%. I work for a very large financial institution and my degree is in Communication. There are so many different departments in places like this and at least with my company  once you’re in they have all kinds of resources to help you develop your career in almost any direction you may want to go.

Post # 24
Member
1754 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2016

Is it possible that you just don’t have the background and training to do a graduate degree in accounting? What educational background do your classmates have?

I just finished an English masters after an English BA and it would have been unbelievably difficult for me if I didn’t have any prior understanding of the field or how to do the work. I had one degree in English and it was still a tough, rigorous program (for me as well as for my peers). I can’t imagine coming into it without any training in the field. 

Post # 25
Member
2233 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: February 2016

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FutureDrAtkins:  or in the non profit area where she already volunteers to write funding proposals and then using any background financial skills to apply those funds in a meaningful budget! 

Post # 26
Member
1296 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2018

At 16 I completed my Maths GCSE, got an A, no trouble.

The next academic year I failed my A-Level and abandoned that ship. I just couldn’t get my head around the step up and it was a whole different ball game.

Similarly with Biology – no trouble at GSCE, but very hard at A-Level. I came out with a D after the two years. I really really struggled for that D. But I loved the class, so sticking with it wasn’t a problem.

It sounds to me like accounting – at least through the academic pathway – isn’t for you. If it truly was I think although you might struggle, it wouldn’t be enough to deter you. Find another way in 🙂

Post # 27
Member
4477 posts
Honey bee

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Jacqui90:  I am an accountant. You don’t have the chops or self discipline for it. Focus on obtaining a job of any sort and getting over your very obvious Internet addiction.

For all the dribble you have written over the years, you could have a novel by now if you would just get off the bloody internet.

Post # 28
Member
919 posts
Busy bee

The fact of the matter is that you need to give up on that dream. Being good at it I’m high school is no accurate comparison to it in college. You cannot get through the classes, and it’s time to admit that. You might think you’re good at it and love it, but  the reality is that you can’t get through. Use your English/writing degree. You’ve graduated with that so long ago that employers are going to want to see internships and experience, and you just need to pick any job that will take you. At this point, you’re in between a rock and a hard place, and you don’t have the luxury of chasing a dream that can’t be achieved and being picky about specific jobs. 

Post # 29
Hostess
4633 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 2016

KitSnicket: I’m wondering this too. I’m in the U.S., but my brother is finishing his Master’s in Accounting this year while he takes his CPA exams. He completed a very competitive undergraduate degree in Accounting before going on to his masters and graduated with a 3.9 GPA. He still finds his graduate program + CPA exams INCREDIBLY challenging and he’s the kind of person who’s busting his butt in the library until 2am every night and working part time on the side. It’s a career that you really have to put in the work to succeed. My brother is naturally very gifted and it’s still a ton of studying.

I think OP is in Australia so maybe it’s different there, but OP, in your shoes, I would take the bee’s advice and get a full time job anywhere to make some money and start networking. Bonus points if you can be a secretary at an accounting firm or work part time (20+ hours) while having an internship 2-3 days a week at an accounting firm. My brother interned (and worked) all through undergrad and was offered a full time position before he even finished undergrad. Internships are key.

Post # 30
Member
622 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: February 2016

Can I ask why you think accounting/finance would be the right career for you? Like what draws you to it?

I’m an accountant (CPA). I got a bachelor’s degree in business and couldn’t find a job after graduation, but it was also 2008 when the economy tanked. I knew I needed a specialized skill and I remember liking my Accounting 101 class in college. I found an accellerated grad program for non-accounting majors and the great part about it was that if you get accepted into the program, you automatically get an accounting job after graduation (you have to interview with an accounting firm as part of the application to get into the school). I couldn’t afford it at the time so I worked my butt off waiting tables for a year, studied my butt off for the GMAT (it’s like the business version of the GRE) and got in. I’m really just a crappy student. I tried so hard all through HS and college and I was a solid B- student. In this grad program, I needed a 3.0 GPA to graduate and I think I ended up with 3.03 or something, and I had NO life whatsoever during that 15 months because I was always studying. My roommate could study 10 minutes for an exam that I studied 6 hours for and she would still get a better grade. But I wanted it, so I did what I had to do to make it happen. I barely squeaked by, got my job, got my CPA license as soon as I could (studying for the CPA exam was basically a replay of grad school…no life and lots of fails and do-overs). I’ve been an accountant for 5 years and a lot of the time I struggle at work. Trust me, the studying doesn’t stop after school. You’re constantly trying to solve issues based on journal entries being booked incorrectly or dealing with how to account for something you haven’t encountered before while your boss is reminding you constantly that he/she is waiting. The pressue doesn’t go away (and gets even worse since they could easily replace you) once you get your job.

Accounting isn’t for everyone and I honestly don’t know if I’m going to last much longer. I can’t see myself in a managerial position and after 5 years, that might be a problem. Also, the hours are HORRID. A common joke in the accounting world is “8-5? What’s that?”. Hilarious, right? I have to pay back my student loans from grad school before seeing about changing careers though, so I’m sticking it out until then.

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