(Closed) Midwife vs OBGYN/DR

posted 4 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 3
Member
602 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: March 2013

@mrscandyv:  My sister used a midwife for her second baby that she just had in March. She liked her there were no internal exams or anything which she liked. The midwife was very knowledgeable. Though my sister opted for a home birth and the midwife lived about an hour away and she went into labor and had the baby before the midwife arrived and with no time to go anywhere. It caused a few issues with social services and the hospital but once all that was delt with everything went well. He is happy and healthy and all is well. Mostly anymore its personal perfrence.

Post # 4
Member
7771 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: July 2010

I would consider a midwife for an additional pregnancy, but wanted a doctor for my first.  I have actually been really glad.  My doctor is really hard core science based and kind of anal (a bit of a hardass) and while that is not my favorite personality, she is an amazing doctor.  Being so hard core, she caught several things in me that arose out of no where that I was never expecting.  I am more of a natural remedy type person, but have been glad that she has done so many things by the book, because it turned out I needed them and she caught some things before they became a problem.  I think if you have a low-risk pregnancy, a midwife might be very nice.  I think it would be more personal.  Again, I wanted an anal doctor that is an excellent surgeon for my first, just in case, and that is what I got.

Post # 5
Member
709 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2014

You could always go with a Doula. They are there to support you through the process of birth and be your advocate. If you want to go natural, that’s what they are there to help with. But a doctor still delivers.

Post # 6
Member
2196 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

My husband and I have decided to use a midwife for the birth of our first baby in November.

I have had 2 appointments with them so far and so far am very happy with the decision we made.

Our biggest factor for choosing the midwife was delivery location. My family doc is an OB and I would be delivering in a very busy hospital with a less than stellar reputation. My midwife is closer to my home and delivers at the hospital we preferred, with the option of a private room etc.

Here are some of the things  (in short) that I’ve enjoyed so far!

– clean, comfortable practice, doesn’t feel at all like a doctors office:  comfy leather couches, a library of books and DVD’s you can take on loan, resources in the area for familys/prenatal classes etc.

– more detailed appointments with midwife vs OB. This is something I can only speculate on though, as I never went to my OB. Our appointments are at least a half hour, and each time they weigh you, check your urine for protein, measure the belly and go over anything that is coming up or previous tests. I actually have an electronic copy of their visit schedule if you want me to email it to you for a read.. just PM me:) They listen for babies heart rate, tell you about the pros/cons of early testing and allow you to make your own decisions based on what you are comfortable with

-choice of hospital… we had 2 choices. Also, choice of home birth. Rental of birth pools if interested.

– we have our primary midwife who stays with us through the entire labour – no changes in nurse shifts to worry about there 🙂 A second midwife comes in during the “pushing” stages of labour who I have also met and will continuet o get to know during this process. Should my primary MW not be available, my secondary will be there for me.  Birth plan is thoroughly discussed with the midwife before the birth and they are there to advocate for you should anything happen and you are unable to communicate clearly with a nurse etc.

-doctors and nurses available in an instant at the hospital should a problem arise. I am not doing a home birth but am more than confident in my MW’s ability to deliver my baby and know when/if more assistance is required from a doctor or nurse that they will request it.

-midwife can come in during C section and stay with me during recovery so baby can go with dad and I’m not alone … DH really liked this option 🙂

-24/7 pager service in case of any complications during pregnancy *huge selling feature for me!*

– 2 visits at my home after delivery to check on mom and baby, help with nursing

– 6 weeks post natal care at the office

-ability to labour mostly at home , MW will come to my house to check me and can decide when we should go to the hospital

-they don’t push for “all natural” birth, but they certainly havea  lot of experience in this and cater to it…  I have already expressed my interest in an epidural and they are 100% okay wtih that.

-same testing offered throughout pregnancy as OB

– I have a binder that I bring to each appt, it has all sorts of info in it – everything about classes, to circumcision, to options about birth location, important numbers they can be reached, what to expect during pregnancy/labour and when they would transfer your care to an OB (high risk patients etc).

Just a few, but I am very happy with the decision we made, but it’s not for everyone! Go with your gut and talk with your spouse to see what is best for you!

XOXO

Post # 8
Member
2250 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@mrscandyv:  In terms of your fear of complications during delivery and a Dr. not being in the room, I just wanted to bring up a couple of things to think about:

Midwives in Canada are HIGHLY trained. The entire university program (4 years+) prepares them for anything and everything related to your pregnancy, labour, delivery and post-partum care. Even doctors do not have this kind of education in this particular specialty. Yes, they are the emergency experts, but in a hospital you could have a Dr. in your room in seconds.

You have a midwife with you every step of the way. She will be in your room with you throughout your labour/delivery to monitor you, answer questions, keep you motivated and make sure everything goes smoothly. Doctors will spend a few minutes with you here and there, and then show up for the grand finale at the end.

I understand it is a totally personal decision, just giving you something to consider 🙂

Post # 9
Member
2196 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

@mrscandyv:  I am actually in Ontario, Canada… my midwife clinic offered a choice of 2 hospitals all within about a 20 min drive of their office. 🙂 My OB wouldn’t have offered a choice, it would have just been her main hospital that she delivers at.

Post # 10
Member
2250 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

@StaceyA:  Yep, many midwives have access to multiple hospitals and give you the choice! 🙂

Post # 11
Member
110 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

I do not deliver babies anymore, but there were two midwives who came into the hospital when I was there. I have recommendations going both ways – for an MD or a midwife. It’s really a personal decision. My only recommendation on the matter is to have the birth at a hospital, especially for a first delivery. Even if your entire pregnancy is normal, no one can tell you that the delivery will have no complications. No one can predict if the baby will have distress, if there will be a cord issue, if there will be severe dystocia… things that require IMMEDIATE intervention.

Can a midwife handle some complications during a home birth? Sure. But it scares me to think of what could be avoided by just having the birth in a medical facility. Even for an MD.

Post # 12
Member
3028 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

I looked into a midwife and found the licensing/titles a bit different….maybe different in Canada.

  • Certified Nurse-Midwife (CNM): an individual trained and licensed in both nursing and midwifery. Nurse-midwives possess at least a bachelor’s degree (most have Master’s degrees) from an accredited institution of higher education and are certified by the American College of Nurse Midwives. 
  • Certified Professional Midwife (CPM): an individual trained in midwifery who meets practice standards of the North American Registry of Midwives.
  • Direct-Entry Midwife (DEM): an independent individual trained in midwifery through a variety of sources that can include: self-study, apprenticeship, a midwifery school, or a college/university program.
  • Certified Midwife (CM): an individual trained and certified in midwifery. Certified midwives possess at least a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution of higher education and are certified by the American College of Nurse Midwives.
  • Lay Midwife: an individual who is not certified or licensed as a midwife but has been trained informally through self-study or apprenticeship.

I contacted a Certified Professional Midwife and personally was not okay w/ her not being a nurse or having formal education. CPM can get licensed by attending a certain number of births rather than a combo of education and experience.  Plus CNM is all that most insurance will cover and paying out of pocket when I have insurance seems silly.  For me I want some medical professional present and am likley to go to a CNM.  

Post # 13
Member
413 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@mrscandyv:  You should have a choice of hospital if there are different midwifery groups in town. Here in Ottawa, we have several midwife groups and they all have privileges at different hospitals. So if one group only has rights at one hospital — another group  in your town will likely have rights at another.

I have decided to go with a midwife over a OB-GYN, with a hospital delivery. Thus far, I’m really pleased with my choice. All of my friends that have done the same have had much more positive birth experiences than those that had OBGYNs. The care you get from a midwife is much more extensive than the care my friends received from their OBGYNs, particularly in terms of appointment time, and I like that there’s significant post-natal care as well.

Midwives tend to have excellent relationships with the doctors at the hospitals where they work — collaborating with doctors and other staff as needed.

Midwives in Canada are very highly trained. If at any point your labour or delivery becomes high risk, they’ll transfer you to a doctor but yet still support you during the birth process.

You get a lot more choice and personal care with a midwife than an OBGYN in my honest opinion. They’re more wiling to work with you and to respect your choices during the labour and pregnancy.

 

Post # 14
Member
413 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Not to say of course that you can’t have a positive experience with an OBGYN — it just comes down to finding a good one, from a good practice too…one whose personality and ideas align with your own about birthing.

Post # 15
Member
3042 posts
Sugar bee

@mrscandyv:  I think this is a great option if you are low risk! Especially since there will be docs just down the hall. I say go for it. 

Post # 16
Member
277 posts
Helper bee

@DrDiane80:  I agree with this statement! My mom had two smooth pregnacies (not even morning sickness or cravings or anything!) but two very complicated births. She almost died both times she gave birth and being at a hospital saved her life.  I know other people make decisions that are best for them, but I could not bring myself to give birth anywhere but a hospital.

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