(Closed) Moissanite confusion….

posted 6 years ago in Rings
Post # 3
Member
1595 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2013

@SparkleBaby:  people know it exists but it is still a pricey stone given that it is not a diamond and that it is lab created–I think it is a hard stone to market/sell to the general public given those factors. It was carried in stores such as JC Penney and Kohls for a while but they did not sell well…also the patent will be up in 2013, and I imagine prices will drop further ones more companies will be able to produce it.

Post # 4
Member
452 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2012

I have no idea why jewelers wont set it for you… besides being misinformed about its properties. And that they wont be making diamond $$$$ off of stones if the word  gets out about moissanite ;) You could try telling them its a diamond that they are setting… some proffesional jewelers cant tell the difference.. though they might call you on it if they do notice. I`m sure you probably already know about it, but http://www.moissaniteco.com has several awesome settings and they sell enhanced and unenhanced moissanite in a variety of cuts.

Post # 5
Member
743 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: December 2012

I can’t be much help because I’m not american but might a small jeweler be helpful? I only use small jewelers, here large chains won’t do any work for you period. I’ve dealt with three seperate small chains so far and not one of them seemed bothered about sourcing/setting/repairing my ring. 

Post # 6
Member
4281 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: February 2009

I think a lot of jewelers just don’t know about moissanite.  Some are probably a bit snobby about it, and others just don’t want to set stones that they didn’t make $$$$ off of selling.  There are a lot of options for purchasing moissy out there though.  And many jewelers have a lot of experience working with the stone, so it pays to do some research.  If your jeweler is uncomfortable with it, maybe it is best to find someone that is confident setting it and that has worked with the stone before.  Another option is Schubach Jewelers; that is where my moissy avatar rings are from.  🙂

Post # 7
Member
4654 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: December 2011

I’ve had success with a few jewelers both in Canada and USA. All were small – not chains.

Post # 8
Member
4476 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: November 2012

I think some jewelers confuse moissanite with cz, and cz will explode if too much heat’s applied to it.  I think it’s also snobbery.

Post # 9
Member
61 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: January 2013

I haven’t had any issues with my Jeweler here in the US.  I would think any place that sells diamons and gemstones would be willing to work with it — moissanites are gemstones in their own right. gluck!

Post # 10
Member
269 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

Please don’t think the industry ignores moissanite because we don’t make money on it. In point of fact, the markup on moissanite is a vastly higher percentage than that of a certified diamond; as I’ve said here in the past, independent stores can’t make a nickel on a GIA stone anymore because the prices are so tightly competitive. 

That said, most jewelers don’t want to set moissanites because they have neve done it before and don’t want to be liable for breaking your stone. One of my diamond setters broke a moissanite during setting because an idiot customer lied to a salesgirl and let her think it was a real diamond. 

If you want to convince somebody to set it who has never worked with the stone before, ask if they have a jeweler who is comfortable setting emeralds. Anybody who can set an emerald will be fine with a moissanite. 

Post # 11
Member
5170 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: January 2010

Look around for more local independent bench jewelers. I have not had any issue finding locals who will work with moissanite, and all have been independent bench jewelers, rather than chains, etc.

Moissanite has its own special needs during setting, but this is no different than a diamond, sapphire, etc. Each stone is different. Find someone who is versed enough in setting moissanite to begin with if you can (someone who sells it, has worked with it, etc)

Post # 12
Member
270 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

I had a horrible time finding someone in my area to work with moissanite. I was on the verge of sending it back and then just in time a fellow bee referred me to the place she went who did an amazing job and only had my ring for a few hours. Keep calling around to your small local jewelers and I’m sure you will find someone. When I called around the minute they heard moissanite their whole tone changed, I asked why they wouldn’t work with moissanite and a few responses were: I don’t want to be responsible if it chips (they must not realize how hard moissanite is), It can’t with stand the heat of setting it (moissanite is very heat resistant), and the most common was they didn’t deal with moissanite becauee they resemble a diamond so much that they don’t want their customers trying to say they brought in a diamond and was switched with moissy. (I offered to bring in paper work stating it was moissy but they still wounldn’t do it) Good luck! 

Post # 13
Member
886 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: November 1999

@lyns86stc:  Wow, that’s kinda messed up. The local jeweler I deal with loves working with all sorts of stones. Every jeweler should know the properties of the gems they work with. And if their customers are worried about them swapping out moissy for diamond, wouldn’t those customers also worry that they’d swap out one diamond for a “lesser quality” diamond? It all sounds like BS excuses for the diamond industry to me.

The only time moissy would be harder to work with would be if it’s colored moissy or the moissy that was white enhanced with a coating on the back. Any coated stone would be damaged by heat. Otherwise, moissy is more resistant to chipping/heating than diamonds. Diamonds vaporize when moissy remains. This is all just ridiculous!

Post # 14
Member
4281 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: February 2009

Well, the girldle on moissy is cut thinner than most diamonds, so that is what makes it slightly more prone to chipping during setting; it isn’t the stone, but the cut.  But the stone can take a lot.  As for the colour enhanced or coated moissanite, it can take heat to 1020F, which is still quite a lot, but it should not experience sudden temp changes.  A lot of stones can be coated though, so it is just important that the jeweler has experience with coated stones in general.  I think the biggger issue with the coated stones is prong polishing, and actually polishing off the coating.

Post # 15
Member
4431 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

All applications of silicon carbide today use synthetic material, as the natural material is very scarce. Silicon carbide was first synthesized by Jöns Jacob Berzelius, who is best known for his discovery of silicon.[12] Years later, Acheson produced viable minerals that could substitute diamond as an abrasive and cutting material. This was possible as moissanite is one of the hardest substances known, with a hardness below that of diamond and comparable with those of cubic boron nitride and boron. Since naturally occurring moissanite is so rare, lab-grown moissanite is the only commercially viable version of the mineral. More recently, pure synthetic Moissanite has been made from thermal decomposition of the preceramic polymer poly(methylsilyne), requiring no binding matrix (e.g. cobalt metal powder).

I think Moissy is mostly lab created…that could have a lot to do with it?

Post # 16
Member
4281 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: February 2009

All moissy that we wear in jewelry is lab created, yes.  And it very well could have something to do with it.  😉  Some people just do not like lab stones, no matter how beautiful.  But there are plenty of jewelers that are happy to work with them as well.  🙂 

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