More puppy woes :( OCD surgery

posted 1 month ago in Pets
Post # 2
Member
1954 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2017

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sbl99 :  as a veterinarian- I’d get that harness off him asap! My background is emergency and critical care, one of my friends is a specialist in canine rehab and physical therapy and those types of harnesses can cause so many issues, as they force the pressure across their shoulders and restrict the normal motion of the shoulder.  I’ll try to find a reference to what I’m referring to and post it.  I’m glad you’re getting an answer with the xrays, fingers crossed he won’t need surgery.

Post # 4
Member
1954 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2017

sbl99 :  https://www.avidogzink.com/to-harness-or-not-to-harness-that-is-the-question/

there are specific picture examples at the bottom of the article regarding restrictive versus non restrictive harnesses (but collars are much preferred). Hopefully they don’t find ocd/dysplasia (typically we see lameness start <1y age with this, but not always). If there is no surgery and it is due to restrictive range of motion of the shoulders and subsequent soft tissue injury, I would highly suggest finding a rehab specialist (your insurance should cover this, they are veterinarians with CCRT credentials) who can really speed up recovery.

Post # 5
Member
1954 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2017

Sorry WB is doing weird things when I try to edit.  I do think it’s probably less likely the harness is the only part of the injury (likely either an underlying abnormality or injury) that could have been worsened by the forces applied by the harness.  Keep us posted!

Post # 6
Member
3400 posts
Sugar bee

Poor guy!  I have nothing to add, but I hope that you get more answers with the X-ray and I hope you can do therapy over surgery.

My doggo broke her toe this past summer and we went through 14 weeks with a splint and I was so scared that we’d still have to amputate….luckily it’s healed!  But we do whatever we can for our fur babies.

Post # 7
Member
49 posts
Newbee

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sbl99 :  I had a horse with ocd and the surgery didn’t cost that much! For a whole huge horse! I had the ocd chip removed and he also needed some tendon repair and then I did stem cell therapy and this thing I can’t remember what it’s called where they spin the horses blood and re inject it into the hock (where the ocd was). The last two things were expensive but I had horse insurance like you have dog insurance. Horse made full recovery and had no lameness or issues he went on to a full award winning dressage career –  the keeping them still for a month or two after was the hardest part. Good luck with your dog. Full recovery is totally possible!

Post # 8
Member
460 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 2018

I have heard a couple of times running with dogs on pavement/sidewalks that are under one year old (or older for larger breeds) can be really hard on their soft joints and cause issues! I’m not sure when you started running with your pup, but definitely something to keep in mind for the future! Maybe the vet can weigh in on that?! If there is any truth to that?!

Post # 11
Member
7379 posts
Busy Beekeeper

Aww poor guy! I would also let your breeder know. I believe OCD is something that can be genetic, so they will likely want to know. 

Post # 13
Member
1954 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2017

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sbl99 :  I’m intrigued by the xrays lol.  Panosteitis (the word you were looking for, aka “panno”) has a definitive appearance on xrays and he’d be the perfect age for it (It usually affects multiple legs sometimes at once and sometimes once at a time), it’s treated with NSAIDs usually for several weeks until it’s resolved (typically by 18-24 months).  Glad it’s not immediately surgical ๐Ÿ™‚

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