(Closed) Mormon & Catholic?

posted 8 years ago in Catholic
Post # 3
Member
4385 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

Was your Fiance baptized when he was younger as well, or was it just this Mormon baptism?

Post # 4
Member
350 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 1991

“I’ve read that the Catholic church doesn’t recognize the Mormon baptism, so it’s almost as if he’s not baptized at all.”

The Catholic Church recognizes baptisms performed in the name of the Nicean Trinity.  Virtually all protestants do that (and are considered validly baptized and partially members of the Catholic Church).  However, Mormons do not believe in the Nicean Trinity (rather they believe in the Godhead) so their baptism is not considered valid by the Catholic Church. 

For a list of baptisms the Catholic Church views as valid you can go here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baptism and scroll to the bottom.  If it says “Trinity” as the standard, then it is probably valid.

 

“He doesn’t consider himself to be Mormon and is not religious in any shape or form, however he was baptized so does that make him Mormon officially?”

You would need to ask a Mormon if he is considered Mormon.  The Catholic Church considers him to be an “unbaptized person”.  Whether or not he is officially Mormon doesn’t matter.

 

“What does this mean for us when we go to get married?”

Can an unbaptized person and a Catholic be married in a Catholic Church?  Yes. What does that mean?  You will need to fill out one extra form (called a Dispensation from Disparity of Cult).  This is all.

edit:  one more thing is different, since you’re marrying an unbaptized person, you would have a Rite of Marriage instead of a Nuptial Mass. So no communion at your wedding (usually you can choose between the two, but in your case, you don’t get an option).  I hope that helps.

 

Post # 5
Member
2395 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: December 2009

Hey there!  Hopefully I can provide some insight.  I can’t help out from the Catholic standpoint, but being LDS (Mormon) maybe I can help out there.  So, when you said:

“He doesn’t consider himself to be Mormon and is not religious in any shape or form, however he was baptized so does that make him Mormon officially?”

Technically, yes that does make him mormon officially.  One you are baptized, you are a member of the church, regardless of whether you consider yourself religious or even you don’t attend church.  The church is set up in the sense that you can repent for the wrong doings that have been done.  So, let’s say that your Fiance were to one day return back to the church even though he hadn’t been following the teachings for years and years.  He would still be considered a member of the church, even though there had been years of not attending church, not following the teachigns, etc.  Pretty much the only way you would be “kicked out” of the church is if you did something really really bad…murder, commit adultery, etc.  As for if the Catholic church recognizes his baptism, I have no idea.

If you have any questions, definitely PM. πŸ™‚

Post # 6
Member
2 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: September 2010

Hey!  I had the exact same situation, except that *I* was the Mormon. Since the RC church didn’t recognize my LDS baptism, all they asked was if I’d formally renounced the RC church (I was baptized RC as a baby). At no point during the LDS baptism process do they require you to formally renounce all previous religious affiliations, so unless he did it on his own, he should be fine.  If he was never baptized Catholic, then he’s a non-Catholic regardless of who dunked him when he was 16. 

I would talk to your priest about it if it’s important to you, and if it’s a sore issue with your FH, maybe talk to your priest privately.  There should be no reason (from what you’ve said) that you can’t have a Catholic ceremony, eucharist included if he was baptized Catholic and has had his first communion.  If he hasn’t been confirmed (which would’ve happened when he was 16), you might want to double check to see if he needs to do that first. 

Keep in mind, too, that if you want to have kids and you want them baptized in the church, part of the process is promising to raise them Catholic.  Personally, I think it’d be worse to promise something you know in your hearts you won’t be able to uphold, rather than let a ritual you don’t fully believe in lapse…but that’s just my two cents.

And, just like the RC church, once you’re baptized, unless you formally renounce the church, you’re always welcome back in the LDS fold. Being baptized in both is sort of like having a spiritual dual-citizenship.  πŸ™‚

Post # 7
Member
350 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 1991

@texeverlasting: “And, just like the RC church, once you’re baptized, unless you formally renounce the church, you’re always welcome back in the LDS fold”

You’re welcome back in even if you do renounce the Catholic Church.  If you didn’t renounce the Catholic Church by formally joining another group, you can be absolved by any priest through the Sacrament of Reconcilliation.  If you did formally renounce the Catholic Church, you were latae sententiae excommunicated.  A latae sententiae excommunication can only be absolved through the Sacrament of Reconcilliation with a bishop, or with a priest given the authority to do so by the bishop (so some priests, but not all).  It’s likely you were asked because the priest didn’t have the authority to absolve from a latae sententiae excommunication and needed to find someone with that authority if you needed it.

Post # 10
Member
2 posts
Wannabee
  • Wedding: June 2003

The Mormon Church would still consider your SO to be a member since he’s officially still on the records of the church.  For someone to be removed from the records of the LDS Church, they’d either need to request to have their name removed or be excommunicated.  There are lots of people (maybe close to half) on the records of the LDS Church who are not considered active in the Church.  Many of those

Since I’m a member of the Mormon Church, I don’t know as much about what baptism means for Catholics, but you can read about what baptism means for Mormons on the Church’s web site:  http://lds.org/scriptures/bd/baptism?lang=eng.

Post # 11
Member
383 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

If he was baptized as a Christian previously, the church would treat your marriage as a mixed faith marriage.

If he wasn’t baptized as a christian, they would treat it as a non-baptized person marrying a Catholic.

The only differences for these are one extra letter of permission from the bishop, but that’s nothing for you to do. It’s just another form the priest fills out. We ran into this problem when my Fiance couldn’t find a record of his baptism.

Honestly, living together will probably be a bigger deal to the priest than the fact that he may or may not be mormon.

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