(Closed) Moving in together costs

posted 6 years ago in Home
Post # 3
Member
10288 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: October 2011

It all depends on where you’re from. Someone in a small town could survive off of a few thousand a month but someone in a major city (like NYC, for example) will need much, MUCH more.

Where is Brisbane? Do you know what the average rent is or how large of a place you’re looking for.

Post # 4
Member
3626 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Are you planning to rent or own? I’m not sure how out works in australia, but you don’t need insurance to rent here. Can you explain?

Post # 5
Member
540 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

Honestly, everywhere is very different. You living in a different country than me would be very different expenses. Even just the difference from a city to the country is very different expenses.

I would say that you should really try to spend less than 30% of your income on housing(rent and utilities). That is the only real tip that I could offer.

Post # 8
Member
3626 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

@Jacqui90: I agree with 30%, that’s a good rule of thumb.

Post # 8
Member
3626 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

Double post.

Post # 9
Member
2494 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2012

It depends on where you live, what your lifestyle is like, what sacrifices you can make and what you already own. I won’t give you prices, but I will give you things to research and look into:

1. Rent. What are must haves (1 bedroom? 2? backyard? apartment? house? basement? mainfloor? ocean view? downtown core? all of these will effect pricing. You can check your local classifieds for average prices)

2. Utilities and “necessities”. Ask friends and family to find out how much the average family in about the size of house you are looking at spends each month on water, electricity, gas, cable, internet, home phone and cell phone.

3. Food prices. I’d ask your family how much they spend on food each month and then assume that how much it costs to feed a family of three is what it will cost to feed two of you. Most people when they start living together and cooking for each other are still learning tastes, likes, wants, etc and some food will go to waste for the first bit.

4. Furnishing. Gah! Most expensive part. Make a list of what you NEED and what you WANT in a house. For example, I NEED a bed, but with my finances, it took me almost 4 years to have a headboard and footboard for that bed and that same amount of time to get night tables. I have friends who consider a tv a need, but it is something I could live without. Something most people overlook when finding how much it will cost to start a household is bathroom items (soaps, shampoos, toothpaste, toilet paper, cleaners, shelving, toilet paper holders, etc), and kitchen food staples (butter, ketchup, spices, etc). Three times I have had to “rebuy” these items and each time I have easily spent close to $300 on those items alone.

 

I would say to move out you need to start collecting furniture from friends, family, etc, set aside money as a “moving fund” and research like crazy to find out what you need.

As for me, I live just outside Toronto, Ontario, Canada. I have an amazing deal on my rent and we spend about $1300/month. Our home and 2 car insurances are $300. Gas is about $400. Groceries are $200 (if I coupon a TON) to $400 (if we eat out a bit). Utilities in the summer are $150, but in the winter go up to $300. Our cellphones, cable, home phone and internet set us back about $300. On top of that we have car repairs, going out, clothing, savings, two dogs and their vet/food/toy bills and then our “just for fun” money. All said and done, we spend about $3000 a month before the “fun” things like clothings, gifts, savings and going out.

When I was a student and lived in a basement apartment for $700 including utilities with nothing but internet and a cell phone and a bus pass instead of a car, I managed to live on $1400 or so before clothing, gifts, savings and going out.

Allllll what you are willing to give up!

Post # 10
Member
3520 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: March 2012

One thing you can do is track your current expenses like gas, groceries, contacts, entertainment, etc. Don’t try to extrapolate, just both of you keep track of what you’re spending.

Add those both together and then estimate the other expenses. If you have a friend who lives in an apartment, you might ask them to tell you how much their utilities run for a few months, to get an idea.

Post # 12
Member
540 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: June 2011

@Jacqui90: Yes. You should try to have your housing including gas, electrical and any other utlities (water…) be less than 30%. It is not always possible when getting your first place, but that is a good starting point.

I have also found that any time I move people are more than willing to give stuff to me to help furnish my new place. Like PP said start telling people now and I’m sure that you will get plenty of offers for free things.

Also, know that all things are possible. I was able to move to San Jose (a fairly costly city to live in) right after high school, with no savings, no family or friends around, working as an AmeriCorps, making well below the poverty line and was still able to make it just fine. It is all a matter of what you are willing to make work and how hard you are willing to try.

Post # 13
Member
699 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

If you’re in school currently, do you have any friends who are living on their own?  Can you ask them about their budgets?  

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