(Closed) MSW – Two thousand ten vs. two thousand and ten debate

posted 9 years ago in Paper
Post # 3
Member
6597 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2010

Oh Martha – you need to keep a tab on those editors!

Post # 4
Hostess
18637 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

Haha and I’ve heard from linguists that the officialy way to say this year is ‘twenty ten’.  We were supposed to be saying the past 10 years like that but it’s sort of hard to say ‘twenty aught aught’ or ‘twenty oh oh’.  Not sure if twenty ten is considered proper wedding invitation spelling though.

Post # 5
Member
6597 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2010

Oh MissAsB – Twenty Ten makes so much more sense and I actually like it better – I might just use that!

Post # 6
Hostess
18637 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2009

I’m trying to use it because it sounds nicer.  Plus think back to the 1900s.  I was born in nineteen eighty seven.  Not nineteen hundred eighty seven!

Post # 7
Member
493 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: December 1969

I put ‘two thousand and ten’ on my invites. That’s what several paper vendors suggested and I had seen elsewhere.

Post # 8
Hostess
16191 posts
Honey Beekeeper

Ooh interesting debate. I haven’t figured out how I am writing 2011 yet…

Post # 9
Member
2280 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

I agree with MissAsB–we called it nineteen ninety nine, why not call it twenty ten now?

You could get really pretentious and say “two thousand and one half score.” How does Martha like them apples, eh?

Post # 11
Member
987 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2009

Yep, I think Martha messed up, although by “Martha” I mean a MSW editor.  I spent a ridiculous amount of time researching this for my own invites and the majority of reliable sources stated that you should not use the “AND”.  But truth be told, who is really going to notice or comment either way?

Post # 12
Member
1011 posts
Bumble bee

This came up here on WB a month ago.

I’m going with Twenty and ten.  I went back to see how mom’s invitation read.  It was Nineteen and sixty-four.

Post # 13
Member
900 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

I’m was going to go with Two Thousand and Ten -but this post made me feel like I needed some research.

I just got this off of the Huffington Post:

Twentynot2000.com Say the year “1810” out loud. Now say the year “1999” out loud. See a pattern? It’s been easier, faster, and shorter to say years this way for every decade”

Pretty convincing.

I’m still going to look around a bit more because the most common way is not necessarily the MLA style way…maybe I’ll check that next.

But do I really care anyway?  Probably not…I’m keeping things casual.

 

Post # 14
Member
1392 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2010 - Heron Hill Winery

geesh I haven’t thought about this much yet…I guess I need to start thinking since we will need to design our invites soon…

hmmm too many ways…I am confused (which isn’t saying much, I am no grammar queen)

September, Twenty Fifth, Two Thousand and Ten

September, Twenty Fifth, Twenty Ten

September, Twenty Fifth, Two Thousand Ten

 

 

Post # 15
Member
143 posts
Blushing bee

To be fair, “two thousand and ten” is the correct usage for British English, and some of my US etiquette books use British form in their examples of formal wedding invitation wording (e.g. “honour” and “favour”).

Post # 16
Member
210 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: May 2010

I’ll probably use two thousand ten not two thousand AND ten because I associate AND with a decimal point

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