(Closed) My name is Roux, and I am a procrastinator.

posted 6 years ago in College
Post # 3
Member
14495 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

Sorry girl, I always did the same thing.

I am so unsure how you are going to compair those two.  I always was told that the Song of Songs was meant to show God’s love for the Children of Isreal, the meaning behind Shabbat. 

Post # 6
Member
14495 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

@Roux:  Have you thought about talking out your essay into a recorder, then writing it off of that.  I used to do that all the time.  I still do it when I have to give speeches, usually I get them done while driving somewhere or while shopping.

 

You lecturer is an idiot, IMO.  My minor was in Hebraic studies and I have never heard that one before.

Post # 7
Member
7609 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

If it weren’t for the last minute, I would never get anything done.  I, too, always needed that pressure.  Good luck!!

 

Post # 8
Member
5118 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: November 1999

I was going to comment on this thread earlier, but I waited a bit 😉 I’m one of those 3am workers as well. I just don’t get motivated to jump on projects until they’re nearly due. Large projects get started the night before (like, after dinner, and the news…ugh!). I know you can do it! Good luck, Roux!

@tksjewelry:  That’s a fabulous idea, esp w/ all the driving I do. I may have to look into that!

Post # 10
Member
7779 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

I’ve heard Song of Songs sometimes interpreted as a parable about the relationship between Christ and the human soul.

I was curious and googled it and I found an interesting interpretation of it on SparkNotes, I think your professor reads SparkNotes! lol

Early Hebrew and Christian scholars long maintained that the love story is an allegory of God’s love for humankind, or of the intensity of divine love within the human heart. However, it is undeniable that the song celebrates not only human love but also the sensuous and mystical quality of erotic desire.

Modern scholars see similarities between The Song of Solomon and other ancient Near-Eastern stories in which the fertility of the earth depends upon the sexual encounter of a male and female deity. Although the biblical maiden and her lover themselves do not affect the fertility of the land, there are numerous parallels between the fertile vegetation of their surroundings and the success of their romance. The lovers recline on a green couch, whose color suggests a connection with nature. The song also explicitly compares the man and woman to vegetation: the woman is a flower and the man is a fruit tree. Images of plants and frolicking animals are symbols of life, and as such they are metaphors for the procreative act of human sexual relations. The song’s references to spring and the budding of plants further emphasize the budding of romantic arousal. The couple always celebrates their love in such verdant environments—in the wilderness, the vineyard, or the garden. It is in the city, where plants do not grow and the city guards are brutal, that the maiden searches for her lover but cannot find him.

The man’s comparison of the maiden to a “garden locked” and “fountain sealed” establishes the relationship between chastity and femininity (4:12). The image of an enclosed garden is a metaphor for female virginity that is frequently repeated in later medieval and Renaissance literature. In the Song of Solomon, the closed garden suggests that the girl is chaste and unsullied. The man’s dining in the garden implies that the two have consummated their relationship, and his invitation to the chorus to celebrate this event with feasting further indicates the completion of this rite of passage. Later, the two walk in a vineyard, and the girl remembers her earlier virginity when she was cursed to labor in the vineyard instead of enjoying it. Her memory while in the vineyard suggests the bittersweet nature of the loss of innocence.

The garden motif is reminiscent of the Garden of Eden in Genesis, where Adam and Eve enjoy God’s creation prior to the emergence of human wickedness. The parallels to Eden in The Song of Solomon suggest that the celebration of human sensuality is, itself, a good and not a wicked thing. The maiden and her lover, however, must enjoy their love within the boundaries and confines of gardens and fields. This limitation on the enjoyment of their sexual behavior is in keeping with the ongoing biblical theme that there are ethical requirements for enjoying God’s promises—for Adam and Eve to remain in the garden of Eden and for the Israelites to dwell in the promised land.

Post # 11
Member
7779 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

Oh, and I always rocked the all-nighter before a big paper was due in college. I was a HUGE procrastinator.

Post # 12
Member
724 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: October 2014

I don’t know anything about the subject but I too am a huge procrastinator! I have a 20 page paper due next week and I am on page 1. I have done all the research and outlined my topic but I just hate putting it all together. 2000 words isn’t too bad – you will be fine 🙂

Post # 14
Member
14495 posts
Honey Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

@Roux:  I think she has Freudian issues.

Post # 15
Member
7779 posts
Bumble Beekeeper

@Roux:  Yeah, my university was anti SparkNotes and Wikipedia (that’s when I learned to cite the sources at the bottom of the Wiki article instead of the article itself. rofl). I find religions fascinating. I have read the bible before and you are definitely right… it’s like poetry, everyone you ask is going to interpret it differently. I don’t quite agree with a “sex manual” but I could see where she could get the interpretation that it is about human sexual desire, etc. Personally, I think that’s a far too literal interpretation though. :

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