(Closed) My parents have some messed up views on being “healthy”

posted 7 years ago in Fitness
Post # 3
Member
11325 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: February 2011

lol wow. you think he just schemes up new and interesting ways to be obnoxious to you? 

Post # 4
Member
391 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: January 2011

yes! I’m 5’1 at 119 lbs and my family calls me “fat.” I wear size 4/6 from a 8/10 and they still call me fat because I am not a size 2 like the rest of my family. It gets pretty frustrating. I told my mom that I have lost a total of xx pounds and she says, “Oh, really? I haven’t noticed.”…grrr

Post # 5
Member
2392 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

Ugh.  That’s like a textbook example of unhealthy ways to lose weight.  I hate when people try to make health a competition… that just seems inherently unhealthy.  He’s obviously convinced that his way is right… as much as there’s a million different diet theories out there, skipping breakfast is always regarded as a bad idea. 

Definitely try not to let it bother you and not to get caught up in it.  What they’re doing sounds pretty horrific both physically and mentally… are they seeing a nutritionist?

Post # 6
Member
264 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2011

It’s not my parents that have messed up viewpoints, it’s actually my Fiance. He thinks that because he’s on his feet working all day for roughly 10-12 hours, walking and lifting things that he doesn’t need to watch what he eats or work out on a regular basis. HOWEVER, I need to because I only teach and I have an addiction to food (which, yes, I will admit that I do). In the two years that we’ve owned our dog, Lucy, he’s taken her on a walk twice. He thinks that she’ll get the most exercise by chasing a ball in the park for 30 minutes then a 30 minute walk every couple of days. HELLO! It’s now currently “winter” and she can’t go to the park. Anyway, he eats what he wants, doesn’t watch his portion control and must be the only one that goes grocery shopping because I always spend too much money on crap (aka healthy things like fruits and veggies, etc). He doesn’t understand that him not changing his eating habits at least a little bit isn’t going to help me in my food addiction! 

VERY FRUSTRATING! 

Post # 8
Member
1872 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: February 2011

EVERYONE has very hard-set beliefs on what “good nutrition” and “health” mean and different ideas of what a “healthy diet” is. Trust me–I’m on weight watchers and the number of people who like to tell me it’s “not healthy” or that such-and-such diet is healthier is staggering. And totally irritating. Let me worry about what goes into my mouth; you worry about what goes into yours.

I have the same issue that you do with my grandmother, of all people. Who is Asian and tiny and literally eats from dawn until dusk–and like, candy and chips–and never gains an ounce. I wasn’t born with that body type and this bothers her to no end. She feels that because she is thin and I am not that she MUST be the authority on appropriate eating habits. Drives me crazy.

 

Post # 9
Member
3564 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

When I was younger, my parents, especially my mom, had a pretty unhealthly mentality toward food–almost definitely some sort of undiagnosed ED. We ONLY had low fat or fat free foods in  the house and my mom would go to the gym at like 6am for two hours, 6 days a week (well, she still does this actually, lol-she’s definietly addicted to exercise).  We never ate red meat or anything fried, and my parents both made comments when I was chubby in middle school and after freshman year of college. There’s a TON of pressure in my family to be thin and be fit–my mom’s whole side of the family, who we see often, are all super thin and yet complaining about gaining weight is always a huge topic of conversation at dinners together. And then my sister and I both developed EDs…shocking, no? *sarcasm*

Post # 10
Member
659 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: March 2011

Next time he tells you about your diet, ask him what school he went to to earn his nutritionist degree.

Also, he’s belitting you.  I would not be able to spend time with a relative that did that.  My mom sometimes comments about my weight, but she’t not one to talk so I just ignore it – my FH thinks it’s horrible. 

Don’t let him belittle you, tell him unless he’s a certified nutritionist and a licensed trainer, you don’t want to hear it.  And remind him that as a parent, if he can’t be happy for/with you, then he shouldn’t be around you.

Post # 11
Member
2321 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

My parents were not like that to me. (Thank God!) They lived by example. However my cousin’s mother has been bitching about the girl’s weight since she was 7-8 years old! NO JOKES!!! She kept nagging the poor girl since that age whenever she ate “omg! you eat SO MUCH! Don’t eat anymore! Don’t eat!”

The girl obvoiusly has no nutritional value in her body. She is now in university. Her hair all turned white around 8th-9th grade. Though that can’t all be diet related (or lack of) but definitely a strong contributor! She does have ED and also thinks that it was really nice of her mom to have done it to her otherwise she’d be so fat and won’t be able to get a date. NO JOKES! So ED is just ONE of the issues that developed. I’m just in shock…. Surprised

Post # 12
Member
2237 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/11/08/twinkie.diet.professor/index.html

Read that article.  I don’t support that lifestyle, but according to the study, it doesn’t matter how you lose weight, just losing weight will make you healthier.

It sucks that your dad makes rude comments to you, but if you don’t want them to try and change your eating habits, why try and change theirs?  People are going to do what works for them and what fits into their lifestyle, not what other people tell them they should do.

Post # 13
Member
1556 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2010

@MandaMack:  I was just thinking about that article.  The professor who did that saw his LDL and triglycerides go down and his HDL go up…and his body fat percentage dropped significantly. 

The weight loss I’d expect due to the calorie restriction alone, but I was surprised by the improvements in his cholesterol and triglycerides.  He did mention that he’s still not convinced that the “Twinkie Diet” is the way to go, especially because there is no way to know how eating that way long-term might affect you.  But I will admit, I found his results surprising. 

Post # 14
Member
2237 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

@Neva: I was surprised as well, and like I said, I don’t support the lifestyle.  But we can’t assume that other people’s diets are bad for them, because that study proves you never really know!

Post # 15
Member
7455 posts
Busy Beekeeper
  • Wedding: November 2010

My parents were like that–obsessed with anything I put in my mouth.  We can’t change them.

I learned to quit listening, reasoning & arguing with them.

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