(Closed) names and different cultures

posted 7 years ago in Pregnancy
Post # 2
Member
1281 posts
Bumble bee

Are there any names that are in between cultures? Ive just had a look at some persian names and there are a few like Cyrus, Navid, Esther, Jasmine and Darius that are well known amongst a few cultures. Other names like Amira are recognisable and beautiful as well. If you really struggle to find any you like, would your Fi come to a compromise, having a persian middle name instead of first name?  

Post # 4
Member
1638 posts
Bumble bee

Or if he feels strongly about the Persian first name, you could have a middle name that you like and call the child by the middle name.

Post # 5
Member
3292 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: September 2010

Are you Persian, too? I’m guessing not. So why does the first name automatically have to be Persian? What about your culture? And the culture the child will be raised in? If you give the child your FI’s last name, that’s already a lot. I don’t see why he should get to dictate both the first and last names. 

Post # 6
Member
2831 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

My husband is very American but his parents are Taiwanese.  His brother in law asked the other day if the kid will have a Chinese name, and we said “uh, we’ll deal with that if we ever go to China, I guess.”  Our child will be born American and grow up American, so he/she is getting a “normal” American name.  Now his brother’s son has a Chinese name, they picked his American name so that it would translate to something they also like (but it’s not on his birth certificate anywhere).  But her parents are still in China so they will visit often, I imagine, and they are definitely speaking Chinese at home so he will learn it.  

Point is, I think it depends how you plan to raise your child.  I think there are lots of beautiful Persian names, but if you don’t like them, you don’t.  I have a friend named Semira, she has a sister Natasha, I think those are both beautiful.  You could give him the middle name and just use it with family.

Post # 7
Member
725 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

A good friend of mine’s husband is Syrian. He was adamant about a cultural name if their child was a boy. My friend was not keen on his choice – it was his grandfather’s name. Luckily for her, they had a girl, so she got to choose the name. Hopefully it doesn’t come to that with your husband.

You have a lot of time to mull over names. There were names that my husband and I liked at the beginning of my pregnancy, that we’d gone off of later on, and others that really grew on us as time went on. 

Post # 8
Member
725 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: August 2010

I’ve just looked quickly online. For girls, what about Ava, Asa, Farah, Jamilah, Layla, Lily, Samila, Samira, Shalah, Tala. For boys, Adel, Shaya, Kia, Malek.

Post # 9
Member
1694 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: August 2008 - Toronto, ON

My husband is Turkish and he has a Turkish first name but when I first met him he told me his name was an English name, the English name is the one he goes by at work, with friends, only his family calls him his real name. He wants to give our child a Turkish middle name and I said to him if you like Turkish names so much, why aren’t you going by your real name? I am picking the first name though and he is picking the middle name but I want it to sound Turkish and English if possible but I know we have to compromise. Have you thought about letting your DH picking the middle name instead of the first name?

Post # 11
Member
840 posts
Busy bee

My husband and I have come to the conclusion, that if we want to give our children names that work in both Finnish and English, we’ll get off easier if we have daughters. Boys names tend to be trickier, but we can go down the Swedish route if need be. Unfortunately for us, boys are vastly over-represented on his father’s side of the family, so with our luck, we’ll end up with only boys 😉

Post # 12
Member
194 posts
Blushing bee

View original reply
Laululintu:  I think there a lot of cute Finnish boys’ names like Mika, Mikko, Timo, Lauri which are nice, not too confusing. E.g. Joel is very neutral and works well in English too but depends of course of your preferences

View original reply
smoocherific:  Do names like Shahin, Kourosh, Omid (boys) Mona, Maryam, Elmira, Samira, Leila not appeal to you?

It’s about what you like but at least you’re not looking at Italian boys’ names like Andrea and Nicola…

Post # 13
Member
1280 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2016

I’m in a similar-ish position… My fiance is persian and I know his family would want our baby to have a persian name but I’m really not a fan of most of them.

What about:

Girl:                              Boy:

Leila                             Amir

Nima                            Milad

Rosana 

Post # 14
Member
1617 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: October 2015

I’m the one with the cultural name and I want my daughter to have my name, but I accept it may not happen. 

Post # 15
Member
6331 posts
Bee Keeper

I like the idea of having an American name and Persian name as first name and middle name or the other way around. It’s a good compromise. Even if your partner doesn’t have a middle name, that could be part of incorporating American culture into the kid’s full name. Since you don’t like a lot of the Persian names, maybe you could pick one that would have a more palatable nickname. 

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