(Closed) Nanny Pricing?

posted 8 years ago in Babies
Post # 3
Member
1940 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: July 2010

There was a really interested post about this recently. 

There are definitely a lot of things to look at.  Is this relative going to be relying on this money completely to live off of?  Will you be providing insurance, etc benefits?  How many hours per week?

Post # 4
Member
1537 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

I used to nanny 1 year old twins and their 3 year old brother for a family friend. I was paid $350 Cdn a week for 6 hours a day, 5 days a week….if that gives you an idea.

I agree with PP that a lot comes into play here. I also had another job to support myself evenings and weekends so I didn’t rely on my nannying for wages.

Post # 6
Member
10367 posts
Sugar Beekeeper
  • Wedding: September 2010

How many hours a day? That sounds scary low. Keep in mind that the daycare is watching many children per person, defraying some cost, vs this person watching just your child. I would highly recommend looking at the thread the PP linked to. I think i’d be insulted with anything less than $10 an hour. I think nannys deserve so much more than they get, but understand that isn’t affordable to almost anyone! When I look at my job and how much I get paid, and know what they do is so much more work and get paid so much less, it makes me feel badly!

Post # 7
Member
1156 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2005 - Westside Loft, New York

pay varies from region to region, but that seems on the low side.  nannies get paid $12-$15/hour here in brooklyn on average for watching one child, 8 hours a day.

Post # 8
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

We pay our nanny $1500/month, so about $375/week, and we feel like we got a really great price.  Most nannies in our area started at $20/hour; ours averages about $10/hour.

Generally, you can expect to pay about double what you would for daycare, but some factors might reduce that cost.  Would your relative do it at his/her house?  Would you expect him/her to do chores around the house while the baby is sleeping?  Do you expect your nanny to be certified (or to get certified) in CPR, first aid, etc…?  Will he/she also be watching other children at the same time?  Has your relative ever nannied before (is he/she a professional)?

I would come up with a budget of what you can spend, and then ask your relative what he/she would expect to be paid.  Hopefully, you can come to a middle ground on price!

Post # 9
Member
4137 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

the difference in this case is that it’s a relative that wants to watch the baby, not some random nanny. if this person is retired, she has a source of income and insurance, so those aren’t considerations. was she offering childcare as a favor? what kind of relative is it? $300/week sounds very generous to me for a relative who isn’t in need of a full income.

you need to talk to the person who offered and ask what her expectations are. she might not even accept money from you!

Post # 11
Member
4137 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

@flamingred: that’s exactly what i was thinking. IMO, $300 is very, very generous.

Post # 12
Member
237 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2009

I agree with Kitzy. This is different then a random nanny looking for a source of income and insurance/benefits. If you came up wtih something you’d be comfortable with you could discuss it with her and see what she says.

Post # 13
Member
536 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2007

Yeah, I think the relative factor makes a huge difference here. Like, if I lived near my mom or grandmother, I would kind of just assume that they’d watch the baby for free for me (at least fairly regularly, if not a full 40 hours/week). When I was a baby, one of my grandmothers watched me 4 days a week, and the other grandmother had me 2 other days since my parents worked a lot and were also taking classes.

Since it’s not as direct a connection (i.e. not the grandmother- or great-grandmother-to-be), I think it makes sense to offer compensation, but I agree that the standards are totally different than if you were to seek out a professional nanny for the job.

If you trust her with your daughter (!) (it seems so much more real once you know the sex, doesn’t it?) and think you’ll jive with her in terms of some basic childcare philosophy, it sounds like a potentially great solution- I just might take extra care in the beginning to make sure that everyone has the same expectations going into this since care arrangements with relatives are usually so much more informal.

Post # 14
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

I still think you should talk to the relative directly.  Our original nanny was an older woman (friend of a friend/co-worker’s wife).  She is a housewife and her husband makes about double what my husband and I make combined, so we thought we were getting a great deal.  When it finally came down to working out the details (hours, pay, taxes, etc…) we found out she had done some homework on prices in our area, and she wanted at least $20/hour.  We were really surprised, and ended up having to make other arrangements a month before I went back to work.  Luckily, we found another nanny in our price range, but you just never know what someone else expects until you talk to them directly.

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