(Closed) Natural birth, epidural or elective caesarean. What did/would you do??

posted 8 years ago in Pregnancy
  • poll: What did you/What will you choose??

    I had a natural birth

    I plan on having a natural birth

    I had an epidural

    I plan on having an epidural

    I had an elective caesarean

    I had a caesarean due to complications

    I plan on having an elective caesarean

  • Post # 92
    Member
    1828 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: November 2014

    If we decide to have kids and end up getting pregnant, BRING ON THE DRUGS! As much as you can give me as soon as you can give it to me!

    Why suffer through something if you don’t have to? Then again, being in pharmacy school I’m a little biased since I know the ins and outs of drugs that most other people don’t (or just think they do because they googled it lol)

     

    Post # 93
    Member
    894 posts
    Busy bee
    • Wedding: August 2012

    I had an epi after I held out long enough. I got it at 7cm and the pain sucked. This go around I’ll probably do the same. 

    Post # 94
    Member
    5654 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: April 2011

    1st time – planned to go natural, got pressured into pain meds, pitocin then followed, epidural, and then “emergency” cesarean.

    2nd time – unmedicated vbac after 45 hours of labor, not counting the 5 nights of “false labor” I had.

    Why I chose natural? Because all intervention regardless of kind does inhibit the body to do what the body was designed to do. Whether I feel my body stop releasing pain endorphins or not, it does and that affects my baby. I wanted to give my body every chance to successfully birth my baby AND wanted to be an active participant in the process, which I can’t do if I’m laughing/sleeping/chatting about other things. I wanted to be the one to say I needed to push, not be told it was time, and I want to be the one to say how I needed to move, not be told it’s time to turn over, etc.

    I believe there are times where pain medication is a needed intervention but unless needed it often causes more issues than benefit, IMO.

    Post # 95
    Member
    71 posts
    Worker bee
    • Wedding: September 2013

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    @Soon2BeMrs7913: I agree that it’s every mother’s right to choose birth for the health of herself and her baby but C-sections for no medical or psychological reasons and merely for convinience sake disturb me. No matter what way you say it, c-sections are surgical. I just want to say too that doctors in some countries (thankfully not mine) are paid on a per-woman basis (i.e. the more babies they deliver, the higher the paycheck for the day).To schedule C-sections is actually in the doctor’s best interest as they aren’t left waiting around for longer labours and deliveries.

     

    I also don’t really sit well with the birth of a child being compared to a “hernia repair” or “breast augmentation”. Birth is at its essence natural, something the woman’s body is designed to do by nature, not an disease or problem that needs to be “taken care of” so to speak.

    I don’t mean to offend, I just kind of found your analogy offensive myself…

    Post # 96
    Member
    71 posts
    Worker bee
    • Wedding: September 2013

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    @silkspectre94:  AMEN! My mother is saying the exact same thing to me. I’m like: if I can’t make decisions and plans to impliment those decision for my health and the health of the baby before birth, then I’m not taking bringing a child into the world seriously enough! I think these decisions are some of the most important I will make in my life.

    Post # 97
    Member
    1263 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: September 2011

    I had an emergency c-section with my son about 4 1/2 years ago, due to partial placental abruption. When I get pregnant again, I will elect to have another c-section. To me, the risks of a VBAC are not worth it and I would rather just schedule a c-section because I know exactly what to expect. Also, this may sound horrible, but I have no desire to go through natural child birth at all.

    Post # 98
    Member
    2268 posts
    Buzzing bee

    I want to try to have a natural birth, but I will happily have an epidural if the pain is too much.

    I’d possibly consider an elective c-section, though I would certainly choose an elective c-section if I was pregnant with twins.

    Post # 99
    Member
    9948 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper
    • Wedding: December 2012

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    @babe_bamboo: you said,

    To schedule C-sections is actually in the doctor’s best interest as they aren’t left waiting around for longer labours and deliveries.

    YES and NO.

    In Canada it is true that we strive to make the best use of our Doctors… so YES C-Sections are “some what” scheduled… in that there are certainly some high-risk patients who know ahead that they will be going that route after consulting with their Doctor.

    (This is the same way that Inductions are organized as well… one is scheduled in for a particular day and time… so as to make an efficient use of the empty beds)

    BUt as Healthcare here, is also coming out of “the public purse”… C-Sections ARE NOT Elective (as in… “I don’t feel up to the idea of going vaginal / natural… so I’d like to have a C-Section instead”) for a perfectly healthy woman and baby.  There has to be a REAL Reason to have one here.

    As well… in most Provinces (not sure about BC)… even tho a woman may have a regular OB/GYN that she’s been seeing thru the pregnancy… that may not be the person who delivers your baby (speaks to your comment about Doctors waiting around)

    Again this goes to the best use of Public Funds.

    And this is one area where we differ in some regards to the USA (as I understand it).

    There is a strong possibility that when someone delivers, altho they may see their Doctor doing rounds at Hospital (checking on THEIR patients at some point during the day) the actual delivery can end up being with whomever is scheduled on a regular shift that day (the OB/GYN on call)

    This is how Public Health Care works (vs Private)… we all share out of the same pot… so the money as well as the manpower has to be accounted for, and used in the most efficient way.

     

    Post # 100
    Member
    71 posts
    Worker bee
    • Wedding: September 2013

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    @This Time Round:  I appreciate your answer and know these things you write and agree but I think you misread what I wrote:

    “I just want to say too that doctors in some countries (thankfully not mine) are paid on a per-woman basis”

    I’m saying that Canada does not use the per-woman basis, as the States (and other countries) do. I’m actually quite thankful and happy that government funding in Canada allows the woman to use a midwife instead of a doctor and we’re not pushed and pulled towards C-sections based on public policy.

    Just a misreading, I understand 🙂

    Post # 101
    Member
    9948 posts
    Buzzing Beekeeper
    • Wedding: December 2012

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    @babe_bamboo:  Lol, ok we are cool then 🙂

    Sorry, I misread / misunderstood (somhow missing the “not mine” part)

     

    Post # 102
    Member
    71 posts
    Worker bee
    • Wedding: September 2013

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    @This Time Round:

    No worries at all! Thankfully we’re Canadian with a rocking health system to share!

    Post # 103
    Member
    2191 posts
    Buzzing bee
    • Wedding: May 2012

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    @ellebeerob:  I’m with you on this.  I wanted a homebirth as well but DH nixed it.

    I had an epidural with my DD but am going to go natural unless necessary.  If you go into labor expecting pain and being scared than you will feel pain and be scared.  I am writing it in my birth plan that I don’t want the words “pain” “hurt” “contractions” used in the room.  Woman have birthed naturally for centuries.  I can do it too.

    View original reply
    @DaneLady:  +1!!  They don’t tell anyone what pitocin does to your baby.  pitocin, epidural, c-section.  Its a slippery slope.

    And for the studies that said married, educated, with pre-natal care were more likely to have an epidural – don’t you think those ob/gyns are pushing this?  they get more money? and less work for the nurses?  Of course more people with pre-natal care have them.  Doctors want you to have one.

    Post # 104
    Member
    4272 posts
    Honey bee
    • Wedding: April 2012

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    @MrsMonty11:  Not horrible. I do not blame you at all and I don’t want to either..I am actually glad you said that, because that is exactly how I feel…after what happened with my LO, I don’t think it is worth the risk at all. Her skin is starting to look better thankfully, but much worst could have happened. When they told me that it looked like she should have been born a week ago, I was really pissed! A PP in another thread said her LO got a lung infection because when her water broke the nurses thought she had just “peed herself”. Now, that is horrible… 

    Post # 105
    Member
    1621 posts
    Bumble bee
    • Wedding: September 2012

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    @babe_bamboo and 
    View original reply
    @This Time Round:  Regardless of public health care, in Ontario at least doctors ARE paid on a per-service basis.  If they have a 24h call shift at the hospital, they get paid per delivery and the rate changes depending on the type of delivery and the TIME of delivery.  

    Given that c/s are paid at a higher rate, there can be an *unconscious* or *conscious* effect of that information on physician decision-making.  This effect is well known to the big pharmaceutical companies who use it to their advantage for marketing purposes (eg. hosting a 3 day seminar for the docs in some tropical locale, or hosting a large fancy dinner during an information session about a new drug….although I do think that we are moving away from this trend)

    Now….as far as my own professional experience, I can say that I haven’t often seen c/s done inappropriately but I HAVE seen a doc sit on a section (that they pretty much knew was going to happen) in order to get paid more as the night gets later.  

     

     

    Post # 106
    Member
    5540 posts
    Bee Keeper
    • Wedding: December 2011

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    @baletrina:  Epidurals aren’t less work for nurses! Foleys, pts who can’t get off their backs, potential issues that have to be closely moitored, epidurals don’t make nurses life easier for sure! 

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