(Closed) Naturopath/Homeopath

posted 5 years ago in TTC
Post # 2
Member
1937 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2013

My mom is a homeopath! She went to school for four years and was classically trained, so I’ve grown up using it (and other alternative medicine) most of my life. 

I don’t think it’s too good to be true, although id want to know how they got their statistics, how long it took to be successful, how bad were the other cases, etc. I think as far as homeopathy goes, one of the most important things is to see a TRAINED homeopath, that takes your case in very great detail. This usually takes my mom at least an hour and a half, and hen she pores over her notes for a few more hours once she gets home. If you walk in and they hand you a cookie cutter remedy without explaining what t does, what its derived from, or why it applies to you then I’d be wary. While some remedies can be used in acute situations, like arnica instead of aspirin, it’s much more effective when the homeopath has sat down with you personally. The goal is to get you healthy enough to sustain a good balance of hormones so that you get pregnant on your own, it doesn’t MAKE you ovulate or get pregnant. 

As for the naturopath, you’d have to research what kind they’re using. My mom works in a clinic with a naturopath who does herbs and supplements and acupuncture, and then a man who’s been classically trained in Chinese medicine. They have achieved some AMAZING results working as a team, the disciplines are often quite complimentary. 

Just be aware of what they’re telling you, and ask many questions. There are always bad homeopaths and naturopaths in the industry, just like any doctor can be sub par. They should be able to explain what you’re taking and why very easily if they are legitimate. Feel out the vibe there yourself and do some of your own research into what they’re telling you to verify. That’s always smart. Good luck, and I hope thia helps you! I know my mom and her team have helped many women get pregnant and have very healthy babies .

Post # 3
Member
575 posts
Busy bee

Homeopathy is not based on scientific methods and there is no evidence that it works. The idea is that you dillute a tiny amount of some substance in water and expect it to have an effect. But of course, any tiny amount of anything cannot have any effect on your body. So it would be the same as drinking water from the tap. In contrast, standard methods have been tested and shown to work – you can read up on their benefits, side effects, success rates. Paying that kind of money monthly for tap water with strange names doesn’seem justified to me.

Post # 4
Member
1143 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: March 2016

Homeopathy is just water. 

Post # 7
Member
95 posts
Worker bee

Clomid definitely isn’t just a “last resort before IVF.” It can absolutely work wonders for people with PCOS! Maybe talk to your RE again about how they think Clomid can help you–do you think you’d feel better if you had a fuller explanation of what they’re trying to accomplish by going that route?

Homeopathy, as others in the thread have noted, is literally water. That “85% success rate” is definitely, definitely too good to be true–personally, I’d ask how they’re calculating that, though I doubt they’ll be able to give you a satisfactory response.

Post # 8
Member
4372 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: December 2016

Not sure where the “homeopathy is water” statement stems from.  All my homeopathic remedies are in a solid state.  Just because alopathic medicine is the mainstream doesn’t mean you should absolutely discount all other paths.  My aunt and mother are trained homeopaths, my family has been using homeopathy for many generations.  

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Soton85:  I believe alopathy is not the only answer, please don’t let those who have bought entirely into what the profit driven pharmaceutical companies want you to know and buy and believe sway you against researching alternatives. 

Post # 9
Member
4844 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I saw a naturopath for a while, and while some of it was helpful, it was an incredible waste of money at the end of the day. It gave me some hope while trying to deal with an incurable disease and I have some symptoms better managed, but this could have been done without spending thousands on office visits and questionable supplements. I would not recommend it personally.

Post # 12
Member
95 posts
Worker bee

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desertgypsy:  Because homeopathy involves diluting things to the point that the supposed “active ingredient” is literally no longer present in the “remedy.” That’s the definition of homeopathy, though that term is sometimes used as a catch-all for “alternative medicine” that doesn’t really fall under that system. I haven’t bought into anything pharmaceutical companies are peddling, but I do believe that the scientific method is the best way of determining what works and what doesn’t. And do you think homeopaths who are charging £300 per month (probably more once you’re buying whatever supplements and such they recommend) aren’t profit-driven?

Post # 13
Member
95 posts
Worker bee

View original reply
Soton85:  Yes, definitely ask your RE everything you’re wondering about, and get a good explanation of the benefits and drawbacks! Those issues with thinning the lining *are* reversible once you stop Clomid, and given the way that Clomid increases success rates in many situations, the benefits really can outweigh the drawbacks when it’s used appropriately.

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