(Closed) need help to translate invitation to French

posted 6 years ago in Paper
Post # 3
Member
1962 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

I’m not fluent… but it looks fine to me. It’s late though so when I’m tired I tend to miss simple grammer mistakes. Try translating what they gave you back into english using google translate and another free translator. If it translates back properly on more than one you should be ok. It’s easy to catch errors that way.

ETA: The main problem I have with those things is that sometimes the way it translates is “proper” but it’s not necessarily how the French would actually word something. Their turns of phrases tend to be different than what those programs give.

Post # 5
Member
1962 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

@lamkky:  I hope some native speakers check for you. I’ve had about 6 years of French between High School and College, but I’m a little rusty. I can tell you that I know what you meant based on reading the French version though. 

Post # 6
Member
1114 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

It sounds OK to me too.  I’m sure they won’t mind if it’s a little stilted, especially if they know you don’t speak French – it’s a really lovely sentiment to send them a personalised note with their invitation.

Post # 9
Member
1962 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: August 2012

@lamkky:  Well at least that would have made for a fun story years down the road! Laughing

Just kidding! I agree with clumsylawyer on the sentiment being the thing that counts here. That really was lovely of you to think of translating it for them! I’m sure they will be very touched.

Post # 11
Member
1114 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: July 2013

Haha!  Don’t worry, I can’t see anything inappropriate there Wink  I’ve written something for you in case you’re a bit wary of using google translate (I often find it easier to start from scratch than to try and alter what’s already there…)

Cher Monsieur at Madame XXX,

C’est un honneur de vous inviter à notre noce, et nous espérons que vous pouviez être des nôtres.  Nous comprenons, cependant, si vous ne pouviez pas y être en raison de longs voyages.

Prévenons-nous si vous pouvez venir ou non.  Merci !

Cordialement,

XXX & XXX

Roughly translates to:

Dear Mr & Mrs X

It’s an honour to invite you to our wedding and we hope you will be able to attend [literally, be one of our number].  However, we understand that you may not be able to be there, due to the long distance.

Please let us know whether or not you will be able to come.

Best regards,

XXX & XXX

Post # 14
Member
1115 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: November 2013

@clumsylawyer:  I’m fluently bilingual and like clumsylawyer’s translation much better than Google’s. As some other posters have said, Google sometimes uses ‘proper’ French. I find too that they sometimes can be a little awkward or do too literal of a translation.

As a side note, I think your idea is a nice touch Wink I plan on doing something similiar for FI’s cousin who lives in France…

Post # 15
Member
10 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: December 2012

@lamkky:  I’m an American planning a wedding in France, marrying French who hardly speaks english and have done a bit of professional translating between the two languages, so I might be able to help you out here. Quite frankly the google translation version isn’t great and parts of it wouldn’t make much sense to a French person.

What I suggest 

Cher M et Mme XXXXX, ( In French Mr. is abreviated M)

Ce serait un honneur (saying notre honneur is just not correct) de vous avoir à notre mariage. (saying you both would be redundant here, and doesn’t flow naturally in a french letter format.) Cependant, nous comprenons si vous ne pouvez pas y être en raison de la distance que vous avez à voyager.

(Both of the other endings had problems here, google first is a bit too abrupt and the second version, “Prévenons-nous…” translates as “Let’s us know…”) I would suggest something like:

Merci de me faire savoir si vous pourriez y être pour partager notre bonheur. (This phrase does not really translate well irectly. But it means “Please let me know if you’ll be able to be there to share in our happiness.” French people really like to use the phrase “partager notre bonheur” when inviting people to weddings or thanking them for coming. 

Cordialement,

XXXXXX & XXXXX

 Now, if there are any native speakers on here they can probably give you something a bit more natural sounding but this version will make a lot more sense than the google version :). 

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