(Closed) Need Help with 12 Year Old Husky

posted 6 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
2335 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2018

Huskies can be a very headstrong breed that need a FIRM owner and a LOT of physical/mental stimulation.

How much experience do you and your Fiance have with headstrong dogs like a husky? What does it look like when you discipline the dog?

How much exercise is she getting daily?

How many toys of her own (not bones) does she have in our house to play with?

ETA: She has the upstairs to herself? Does this mean she gets shut away from the family for most of the day upstairs?

Post # 5
Member
313 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: September 2005

Huskys are a breed that aren’t for the faint of heart.  They need firm training constantly and continous physical activities or else they get bored and try to proclaim dominence.  Regardless of how long you’ve lived with her or known her if she is taking food right off the plate she is showing dominance which needs to be nipped in the bud.

Post # 7
Member
8394 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: August 2012

Have you ever used NILF (nothing in life is free)? You can google it for more info, but basically you make them work for everything. A sit before going outside, shake before getting a treat, down before throwing a ball, etc. I think you’ll find it more effective than yelling at her. When you’re eating I would keep a leash on her so any food stealing can be immediately corrected.

Has she had a vet checkup lately? 12 years old is getting up there, it’s possible some of her issues could be health related too. Deafness, a UTI, maybe pain from arthritis etc could all be contributing factors.

Post # 8
Member
9082 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: December 2012

It sounds like the defined lines of “Alpha” and “Beta” are skewed. You need to redefine that you and your SO are the Alphas and she is a Beta.

Also, as Westwood said, 12 is pretty up there for a dog. There might be something else going on below the surface– I’d have her checked out too, to make sure.

Post # 9
Member
996 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

@Kellylovesanthony:  Oh that isn’t good. If she shows her teeth at you when you discipline her, she isn’t realizing you are the “leader” or “alpha”. I really don’t have any other advice other than to get it through the dog that you are the leader. I’ve heard huskies can be very tough dogs to have because they are so dang stubborn! 

Post # 10
Member
1026 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: September 2012

The first thing I would do is a vet visit.  Dogs can’t tell us when they are in pain, so changes in behavior are the biggest clues to something being wrong.  A lot of what you described could be restlessness due to pain – maybe from her hips, arthritis etc.  A vet can figure out if thats whats going on, and what can be done to manage it.  

If the vet says nothings wrong, I would look at a training refresher. NILIF that a PP recommended is a great program, but really any training program that you are comfortable with would be a help.  It may be that as she has “settled in” to your home, she has started to feel like its hers and she is in charge.  Even a few basic obediance classes may help her back into the mindset that you are in charge and she follows your rules.  

I would also look at how permissive you are being- I know we tend to spoil our dogs as they got older. (We had a pomeranian who though he was king of the world when he passed away at 17 years old).  Are you spoiling her without realizing it and then getting upset when she assumes she should get something?

Post # 11
Member
2335 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: April 2018

@PinkMermaid:  +1

This is what I was sort of getting at in my original post.

Even if you’re ‘familiar’ with the dog, with breeds like husky, you need to CONSTANTLY maintain your position as the alpha in the family. They are naturally headstrong dogs that need a firm and CONSISTENT owner. Consistency is key.

If you are afraid of the dog when she bares her teeth at you, that’s not good. She’ll pick up on this, and it simply reinforces that she really is the Alpha.

After a vet visit, I would perhaps seek the help of a professional dog behavioralist if you are uncertain of how you should best assert yourself as the dominant person in the relationship. Trying to maintain its ‘alpha’ position in the pack can actually be quite mentally stressful for your dog.

Post # 12
Member
8487 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2014

@Kellylovesanthony:  Well you shouldnt yell at her to begin with, and unless her hackles are up and you can hear audible snarling noises, its more likely that its a submissive grin, not a snarl. A submissive grin is used when they are trying to passify or calm down another dog/you. 

 

 

Post # 13
Member
474 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: August 2013

I would take her to the vet ASAP.  My husky did the same thing right about the same age.  He had a crate that I left open and had his bed in it and he liked going there for peace and quiet away from his grumpy, blind cocker spaniel (got them at the same time so that wasn’t an issue).  He started snapping at me when I went to pet him, would show his teeth when I yelled, would snarl when I went to put his lead on.  He died about 4-6 months after starting this.  Never found out from what, but I suspect he was sick that whole time and I ignore the symptoms as him getting old.  He did still love his cuddle time and was super affectionate, but would get snappy real quick. 

 

Post # 14
Member
8487 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2014

 

This is a good example of a submissive grin. 

Post # 15
Member
2488 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: October 2012

I’d contact your vet. I have a malamute puppy and this doesn’t sound like an Alfa Beta problem to me it sounds like physical or maybe even mental health issues- Sorry to call your dog mental :S I don’t mean it to come across like that but deaths – moving- all that on top of age could really have had its affects. When I moved away my dog almost died but my parents took him to a vet and got him stable and adjusted – and now he’s better then he’s been in years he is going on  17 years this upcoming april.

Post # 16
Member
8487 posts
Bumble Beekeeper
  • Wedding: April 2014

And I also suggest taking her to the vet. Its not normal behavior for a dog to suddenly start stuff like that unless something is wrong. Better safe than sorry.

The topic ‘Need Help with 12 Year Old Husky’ is closed to new replies.

Find Amazing Vendors