(Closed) New cat tried to attack my other cat!

posted 7 years ago in Pets
Post # 3
Member
1664 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

Have you gone to the library or talked to your vet about introducing the cats? If not, I’d start there.

Off the top of my head, I’d say that I think your new cat feels jealous. Your new cat was crated while the old one had full run of the house. Could the new cat see this? Have you been giving cats equal affection?

I’d uncrate the new cat but keep it behind a door and put treats on both sides. Let them meet by paw pats under the door. Also, giving each of them a nice blanket or toy with the other’s scent on it should help.

Post # 4
Member
1543 posts
Bumble bee

What genders are both cats? Are both (or just one or neither) of them spayed/neutered? How old are each of them?

Post # 6
Member
1664 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: May 2011

I think she will eventually at least tolerate the other cat if you do this right. I’m not sure exactly what “right” is, so I’d definitely talk to a vet and/or check out some books.

Post # 7
Member
283 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

I foster for a local rescue group, so I have cats coming in and out frequently. They don’t always like my resident cats (and vice versa). I always start with the same introduction you did, but sometimes I also add in an “extra stage”. I have a large folding gated/pen (metal “puppy pen”) which I use to markoff a small section of the house (such as the kitchen, part of the living room, etc).

I start off by letting the new cat into the pen for a little bit each day — say 30 minutes to an hour. Gradually I increase to the point where the cat spends the majority of its time in the pen. It gives the cats the chance to interact and avoid eachother whenever they want. They can see eachother, even touch eachother if they want, and get out their frustrations without being able to hurt eachother. It has also worked for me and I’ve never had an attack, even after fostering a few Cujos, lol.

If you don’t want to invest in a pen (mine is a little more than 4ft tall — a playgate won’t work because the cat will hop right over it), you can try water and vinegar in a squirt bottle. Cats hate vinegar, for some reason. I feel like this is a less effective way of introduction, however, because it stifles behavior rather than giving the animals the chance to work out. Trust me, they are cats, and cats maintain certain hierarchies that will have to be established at one time or another.

I commend you for your patience though, in all seriousness. I also tell people to go about introductions this way when they adopt one of my fosters, but I am almost certain that the vast majority of them throw new cat and old cat together, cringe, and wait for hell to blow over. You’re doing a good thing for your guys by giving them lots of time to adjust. Kudos, and good luck 🙂

Post # 8
Member
283 posts
Helper bee
  • Wedding: July 2011

Also, you might want to look into a Feliway plugin for the new cat. It releases hormones to relax the cat an take the edge off. You plug it into a wall just like a little air freshener. There is also a supplement called Rescue Remedy, which is a liquid you can add to the cat’s food or water to accomplish the same thing. They work differently for different cats, but it may be worth a try to pick up one of them and see how it works.

Post # 9
Member
622 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2011 - Vandiver Inn

This might be a really stupid question, but are you sure it was an actual attack and not an attempt to play? Cats can sometimes play pretty rough, even with the fluffing up and hissing. I had two beatiful gentle girls who were very tightly bonded and they’d bite and hiss while they were playing. Also, my current two cats co-exist just fine, but when they play they both fluff up and race around like crazy things. Still, believe it or not, they’re having fun.

Anyway, if they are truly attacking, then there are other things you can try. I did have this problem once and my vet recommended Feliway. They look like plug in air fresheners, but they dispense feline phermones that can calm your cats. It can help to ease a transition like this. Definitely talk to your vet if you’re really concerned though. That and the cat rescue where I found my girls were the best resources for me.

Honestly, unless the little girl is pinning her ears back and howling like a banshee, I think you might be okay. They may just need some time to be loose around each other and get used to it is all.

Post # 10
Member
4355 posts
Honey bee
  • Wedding: June 2013

I wouldn’t worry too much, just keep monitoring them when they are together but they have to work out their alpha situation on their own. I had a male cat who was the only cat in the home for 3 years and my sister moved home with a young female cat (they were both fixed) but their had a rough go at the start because the male had been used to being the only cat and the alpha by default. In the end, the female won the alpha position and they were fine but they had to working out on their own terms. Neither sustained any injuries or anything and we kept a close eye on them but I really feel like you should expect any miracle friendships over night. 

Post # 11
Member
93 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: October 2011

I think EleanorRigby had some great suggestions. When Fiance and I moved in together, I had my 5 year old cat, and he had his 108 lb black lab. Yea, the lab, probably looked like a big scary black giant to him. the cat was terrified. our meeting process lasted several months, and i think it worked really well.

the cat, was confined to the bedroom, while the dog had the rest of the apartment. they would be able to sniff under the door. When we’d take the dog for a walk, we’d let the cat out into the apartment to smell around. When we got back, one of us would go inside first to put the cat back in the bedroom. We’d also bring out blankets, etc, that the cat laid on in the bedroom out into the rest of the apartment for the dog to smell.

this was for probably at least 2 months, not joking, maybe even longer. Our cat was seriously terrified of the dog, and you are not supposed to force meetings. you need to make sure they are at the animals comfort and choice. the next step was putting the dog on a leash (we did this when he was calm – like after a roller blade or run) and he was laying on the couch or the floor, and we’d hold the leash so he didnt have much leash at all. Then, open the bedroom door, and if kitty wants to come out, it will. We prob did this for another month at least (and continued letting cat into dog area while on walks)

eventually they were semi comfortable being in the same area. I think the biggest challenge was getting the dog to realize he could not chase or try to eat the cat!

for a long while, the cat stayed in very safe places, mainly underneath a chair (we called it “the cage”) it was funny. a little over 2 years later, the dog will chase the cat away from the water bowl and cat will “run” away and then come right back, they take naps together on the bed/couch. and i’ve even seen the cat step on the dog to look out the window in the car one time. They aren’t the best of friends, but more so all the time they get along and the cat isnt scared anymore.

Oh! One other important thing we read about (we did quite a bit of research on the whole intro thing) was that dogs are pack animals, and by that time, dog knew that Fiance him and I were a pack, but we needed to let him know the cat was too. Fiance took this kind of seriously, it was adorable, but he sternly would say to dog that cat was part of our pack.

Sorry this got so long, but i hope it may help in some way. Just know it takes time, and even if they fight in the beginning, im sure a lot of that has to do with establishing territory and dominance, and doesnt mean that they wont not get along forever.

Good luck! yay animals, they bring so much happiness to life!! 🙂

Post # 14
Member
441 posts
Helper bee

I have a two-year-old female cat, and my sister has a three-year-old male cat. Both are fixed. When we both visit our mom at the same time, we often bring our cats. For the first day or two they’re together, they “fight” a lot. There’s lots of wrestling and hissing and horrible meowing noises (my cat is a huge drama queen). Anyways, after a few days, they’re suddenly cuddled up together.

Maybe your cats just need a little more time together to get used to one another. Obviously, you’ll want to supervise this because you don’t want either of them to get hurt.

Good luck!

Post # 15
Member
1723 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: June 2012

That sounds like regular cat playing to me.  They have to figure out who’s the “boss” of the two and fighting is how they decide.  I’ve got 2 cats, one bigger and one smaller.  The bigger one was here first so he’s the “boss” lol.  They chase each other and fight all the time.  It’s part of how they play.  As long as they’re not bloodying each other up, they’re probably just having fun together.

Post # 16
Member
3049 posts
Sugar bee
  • Wedding: January 1991

Are you introducing a kitten or a cat that is 2 years or younger? Kittens love to play and they jump all over each other and make crazy noises. It sounds normal to me, besides that you said they were both terrified? Cats are all kinds of crazy! Mine used to hide on the stairwell and jump out and jump on my back… scaring the CRAP out of me! This could be normal behavior for them. Don’t worry if they are “batting” at each other with their paws. Start worrying when the batting turns into scratching to a bloody pulpy mess.

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