New Job but Want to TTC… advice?

posted 2 weeks ago in TTC
Post # 2
Member
367 posts
Helper bee

I think it really depends whether you want to wait till you’re established in your new job or if you would be okay with being pregnant immediately. You might have morning sickness to deal with as well as adjusting to a new workplace. Can I ask what age group you are teaching? You might also want to consider waiting till you pass whatever probationary period you might have/until your benefits kick in. Maternity leave, etc. you will be able to get is another factor.

That being said, I am TTC in even less ideal circumstances 🙂 In the end it comes down to what you and your husband want!

Post # 4
Member
797 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2017 - California

Maybe consider waiting until your benefits kick in, but truthfully I would not recommend waiting other than as necessary for maternity leave benefits because it could take longer that you might imagine to get pregnant.

Post # 6
Member
797 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2017 - California

Not a silly question! I think it just depends on your husband’s policy as I am not sure there is a generally applicable answer to this. In my case I think it would have been a little while for my maternity leave benefits to kick in but I can’t recall. At this point I have been at my current job for a couple of years so they kicked in a while ago. I think, but am not 100% sure, that FMLA benefits do not kick in as being required until after you have been at a job for a certain amount of time, but not what the impact of that would be on benefits at a company as I would imagine it would vary. 

Post # 7
Member
990 posts
Busy bee

You need to understand how you are paid as a teacher, how maternity leave is paid (if it is), and how short term disability is paid (or not) should you be put on bedrest before delivery. And the date you will qualify for job protection under FMLA.

 

In my state, public school teachers receive no paid maternity leave and must use accrued sick days (earned at the rate of 5 per year) to get paid on maternity leave. All they get is job security through FMLA or ADA. Supplemental disability policies can pay for part of your mat leave IF you’ve been with the district long enough to qualify.  And even if you have no income during maternity leave, your payments to retirement accounts or insurance through the district are still owed so you actually owe them money. You also get paid for the days you worked in 9 months of school divided by 12 months a year so if your maternity leave is during the school year it’s really like missing 1.33 days of pay for every 1 day of leave. For this reason many teachers try to “time” their pregnancies to give birth in May or the summer. Others will go back to the classroom after 3-4 weeks if they have to financially.

 

Considering 70%++ of the profession is women, it’s shameful how teachers are treated when it comes to maternity benefits. At least in Texas. YMMV. 

 

Point being – REALLY research your district’s coverage and have a financial game plan ready if you give birth during the school year or are on bedrest and don’t have adequate coverage.  

 

Being on your husband’s health insurance has nothing to do with any of this.

Post # 8
Member
50 posts
Worker bee
  • Wedding: October 2019 - -

Definitely agree with pp on how teachers are treated. Several close friends and family members of mine are teachers and it’s just not fair. That said, what is the rush, Bee?! You are both young and from the sounds of it, just getting started on your careers that you both worked really hard to obtain with your time in school. What is the argument against waiting a year to get more established, let the benefits kick in, etc.? I just got married myself so I totally get the hype and excitement and wanting to move forward, but, my advice would be to think about giving yourself this year of laying a little more foundation. It can pay off exponentially and put you and your family and child in a better position. 

Post # 9
Member
940 posts
Busy bee

Congratulations on graduating and having jobs already!  That’s so exciting 🙂  Do you know if/when you’d want to go back to work after having a baby?  Or do you know if your husband will get a paternity leave? It could be nice if he was at his job long enough to save up some time off so that you could both be home with the baby after you give birth.  

 

Post # 12
Member
20 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: March 2019

FMLA typically doesn’t apply until you’ve been employed for 12 months. So you have to ask yourself, are you okay should you have to take unpaid time off? And are you okay if you don’t have a job? Without FMLA, there’s no job security or guarantee of a job when you come back. 

I feel like both of these are worst case scenarios but definitely very real options. At both companies I’ve worked for, you have to be employed for 12 months before tapping into FMLA and company paid maternity leave. Obviously yours could be different, but without knowing, I feel like you have to prepare for unpaid leave and no job at the end of it. 

Post # 14
Member
20 posts
Newbee
  • Wedding: March 2019

Looks like that is referring to a legal stance, probably FMLA (Family and Medical Leave Act), which gives job-protection and unpaid leave for qualified medical/family reasons. Legally an employer is required to abide by this act after 12 months of employment. They have no obligation to pay you and their maternity leave does not have to be applied within this timeframe either. 

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