(Closed) New Study Re: Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

posted 7 years ago in TTC
Post # 3
Member
5670 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: August 2010

Very interesting. Thanks for sharing.

I’m very cautious and I guess if I could by child’s entire life then I can go without alcohol for 9 months. I just hope I don’t crave wine too bad when the time comes 😉

My dad was the product of fetal alcohol syndrome and I know that’ll always be in the back of my head.

Post # 4
Member
868 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: September 2011

Interesting article- I’m hoping that those who are “daily” drinkers didn’t know they were pregnant during the time period they were drinking like that- but I guess you never know. 

I always feel like having studies like this can be a double-edged sword…. I think people will talk themselves in to believing that drinking during the 2nd or 3rd trimester isn’t dangerous, even though the article specifically says that effects are unknown.

Post # 5
Member
519 posts
Busy bee
  • Wedding: May 2012

That is interesting, and while it’s probably fine to have one drink when you are later in your pregnancy, I had a professor who said, “you wouldn’t give your newborn baby alcohol, so why would you drink while pregnant?” This has stuck with me, because ultimately your baby gets some of whatever you consume, so really, why would you let any alcohol get to them in your womb?  

Post # 6
Member
178 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

I can’t help but jump in here.  I have posted the abstract below from the actual scientific article – the popular press is notorious for misinterpreting the original scientific articles.

One point I would like to emphasize is this study did not examine the effect of alcohol on brain development/learning/behavioural problems at all.  It seems from the abstract that they only studied the effect of alcohol consumption of the physical features.  The brain develops all throughout the pregnancy (and even after birth) and I would be very concerned about alcohol use in the second and third trimester. There is plenty of evidence of the impact of alcohol use on the brain, and this can be very debilitating. 

 

Background: The physical features of fetal alcohol syndrome include smooth philtrum, thin vermillion border, short palpebral fissures, microcephaly, and growth deficiencies on weight and height. However, little is known about the specific quantities of alcohol exposure, pattern of drinking, timing of exposure, and magnitude of risk for each of these features.

 

Methods: Using data on 992 subjects collected prospectively in California between 1978 and 2005, we examined the patterns and timing of alcohol exposure in relation to these features. Structural features were assessed by a dysmorphologist who performed a blinded physical examination of all infants. Patterns of drinking were evaluated by drinks per day, number of binge episodes, and maximum number of drinks. Timing of exposure was evaluated 0 to 6 weeks postconception, 6 to 12 weeks postconception, first trimester, second trimester, and third trimester.

 

Results: Higher prenatal alcohol exposure in every pattern was significantly associated with the incidence of smooth philtrum but not with short palpebral fissures. The strongest associations were with timing of exposure in the second half of the first trimester (RR 1.25, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.36 for average number of drinks per day; RR 1.17, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.26 for maximum number of drinks in 1 episode). Similarly, thin vermillion border was most strongly associated with exposure in the second half of the first trimester. Findings with respect to timing of exposure were similar for microcephaly and reduced birth weight. However, reduced birth length was increased with exposure in any trimester. These associations were linear, and there was no evidence of a threshold.

 

Conclusions: Reduced birth length and weight, microcephaly, smooth philtrum, and thin vermillion border are associated with specific gestational timing of prenatal alcohol exposure and are dose-related without evidence of a threshold. Women should continue to be advised to abstain from alcohol consumption from conception throughout pregnancy.

Post # 7
Member
1550 posts
Bumble bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

wow, there are people who drink MULTIPLE drinks a DAY while pregnant? dang….

Post # 8
Member
9029 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2011

All I know is everything you consume goes to the babies blood stream as well. Even when you are breast feeding the alcohol goes into your breast milk so I personally wont drink alcohol while pregnant. I never drank alcohol even pre-pregnancy.

Post # 10
Member
9053 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper
  • Wedding: June 2010

Very interesting. Thanks for posting. I feel that as a very occasional drinker in the first place a transition to complete teetotaler for nine months wouldn’t be hard enough to risk “results unknown”

Post # 11
Member
178 posts
Blushing bee
  • Wedding: April 2011

I hope I didn’t sound too preachy. It is the health care provider in me talking…

Post # 12
Member
9824 posts
Buzzing Beekeeper

Studies like this make me glad I hadn’t had a drink in months before I conceived.

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