(Closed) NFP charting (STM) and travel / time-zone change

posted 8 years ago in Catholic
Post # 3
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

When we went on our honeymoon to Europe (I think we had a 10 hour time difference?), my temping also became really screwed up.  Luckily, my CM charts stayed the same, and my cycles were fairly predictable at that point. 

How do you feel about using a “back-up” method of birth control during your honeymoon?  We used condoms to be safe, but you could use whatever form you’d be comfortable with.  If you are not interested in using artificial bc, though, I think home ovulation test kits could be a good alternative.  They’re pretty accurate, and might give you the additional info you need to make a decision about your cycle and intercourse.  Hopefully, your NFP counselor will be able to give you more accurate advice!

Post # 5
Member
6009 posts
Bee Keeper
  • Wedding: May 2009

I think that the time zone change just messes with your bodies normal sleep/temperature cycles making ovulation harder to chart.  Only going an hour away didn’t change my chart any, but going multiple hours away/dealing with jet lag/being on a completely opposite time schedule definitely screwed up my temping.  Hopefully, ovulation test kits will make up for the wacky temps or your counselor will be able to suggest something else.  Good luck!

Post # 6
Member
2004 posts
Buzzing bee
  • Wedding: November 2008

When you’re changing just two or three timezones, you can also try to adjust in advance. So if you temp at 7 a.m. EST and are going to Pacific time, for the days leading up take your temp later by half-hour intervals. That way there is no one jump in temp times. The trouble of course is that at a certain point you will need to get out of bed, and it wouldn’t work for a trip across the ocean. 

The second thing is that you can still calculate an accurate chart with missing or abnormal temps. You knew that a sudden 98 degrees on a day when you had traveled and gotten jet lagged was weird, so you can count that as an abnormal temperature and not include it in the calculations for the temperature rise pattern. The days that followed also showed a decreasing temperature pattern, whereas you need a rise.  It’s also important to keep tabs on your mucus read when the temperature sign is wonky (like would also happen if you get sick). If in doubt, wait another day.

For fertility monitors, we heard good things about the LadyComp in our NFP class. I haven’t used it myself (it’s kind of expensive), but it’s supposed to be really effective in identifying safe days. 

Also, you mentioned some cycle irregularities. If you haven’t already, check out Fertility, Cycles, and Nutrition.

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